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George Melly; British jazz singer; 80

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  • pdqblues
    At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of these figures of
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 14, 2007
      At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
      of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
      these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
      information can be gleaned from these obituaries.

      My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
      off topic.

      Paul


      http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070711/news_1m11melly.html

      OBITUARY
      George Melly; British jazz singer; 80

      ASSOCIATED PRESS

      July 11, 2007

      George Melly, a flamboyant, gravel-voiced jazz singer, critic and
      raconteur, died Thursday, his wife said. He was 80.

      Though suffering from lung cancer and dementia, Mr. Melly continued
      performing nearly until the end. He gave his last concert June 10. He
      died at home in London, Diana Melly said.

      Mr. Melly was noted for loud suits, louder ties and the image he
      cultivated of a hard-drinking throwback to the Jazz Age.

      After his navy service in World War II, he relished the life of a
      peripatetic musician. "Hard drinking and squalid digs, but absolutely
      no regrets," he once recalled.

      Mr. Melly gave up the musician's life in 1962 to concentrate on
      writing about surrealist art and working as a music and theater critic.

      In 1974, he went back on the road with John Chilton's Feet-warmers.

      In addition to his wife, Mr. Melly is survived by his son, daughter,
      stepdaughter and four grandchildren.
    • lmme2010
      thank you very much ,with real audio ,i finally heard 17 Esther Bigeou songs :-) , as said an inlove , passionnated for blues friend , it seems very campagne
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 15, 2007
        thank you very much ,with real audio ,i finally heard 17 Esther Bigeou songs :-) , as said an
        inlove , passionnated for blues friend , it seems very campagne , work songs , old , melodies ;
        her voice is simallary to Billie ; nore than Bessis vey differente ;

        june


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      • David Richoux
        Mere minutes before I got your e-mail I was just starting to read a used copy of Mellymobile (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket art by Trog - Wally
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 15, 2007
          Mere minutes before I got your e-mail I was just starting to read a
          used copy of "Mellymobile" (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket
          art by "Trog" - Wally Fawkes) that I had recently bought on Amazon.
          His description of the Trad Jazz scene in the 1950-1970s UK is
          hilarious!

          While I was on a UK tour in the 1990s I picked up a LP by John
          Chilton's Feet-Warmers in 1972 called "Nuts" (along with some other
          fun records by the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra jug band and others.)
          There is a great picture ( I assume it is one of George) on the back,
          with the caption "Wouldn't this photograph make a beautiful
          enlargement?" I had no idea of what I was getting - just bought it
          based on the picture and song selection... I was not disappointed!

          Humor and Jazz = Hokum
          (and that is a good thing!)
          Dave Richoux

          On Aug 14, 2007, at 3:27 PM, pdqblues wrote:

          > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
          > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
          > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
          > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
          >
          > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
          > off topic.
          >
          > Paul
          >
        • David Brown
          A younger Melly can be read on the British jazz scene in Owning Up 1965. Now republished as part of an autobiographical trilogy also entitled Owning Up .
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 16, 2007
            A younger Melly can be read on the British jazz scene in 'Owning Up' 1965.

            Now republished as part of an autobiographical trilogy also entitled 'Owning
            Up'.

            Thoroughly recommended wonderful account of Melly, the music and humanity.

            Dave




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • tc
            No need to apologize. These guys get little enough recognition during their lives and very little at their passings so it s good to keep their memories alive
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 19, 2007
              No need to apologize. These guys get little enough recognition during
              their lives and very little at their passings so it's good to keep
              their memories alive here.

              On 8/14/07, pdqblues <PDQBlues@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
              > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
              > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
              > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
              >
              > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
              > off topic.
              >
              > Paul
              >
              > http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070711/news_1m11melly.html
              >
              > OBITUARY
              > George Melly; British jazz singer; 80
              >
              > ASSOCIATED PRESS
              >
              > July 11, 2007
              >
              > George Melly, a flamboyant, gravel-voiced jazz singer, critic and
              > raconteur, died Thursday, his wife said. He was 80.
              >
              > Though suffering from lung cancer and dementia, Mr. Melly continued
              > performing nearly until the end. He gave his last concert June 10. He
              > died at home in London, Diana Melly said.
              >
              > Mr. Melly was noted for loud suits, louder ties and the image he
              > cultivated of a hard-drinking throwback to the Jazz Age.
              >
              > After his navy service in World War II, he relished the life of a
              > peripatetic musician. "Hard drinking and squalid digs, but absolutely
              > no regrets," he once recalled.
              >
              > Mr. Melly gave up the musician's life in 1962 to concentrate on
              > writing about surrealist art and working as a music and theater critic.
              >
              > In 1974, he went back on the road with John Chilton's Feet-warmers.
              >
              > In addition to his wife, Mr. Melly is survived by his son, daughter,
              > stepdaughter and four grandchildren.
              >
              >
            • Dan Van Landingham
              Can anyone tell me more about the British trad jazz scene?I vaguely remember some of the sides such as that 1959 tune Petite Fleur ;as I recall,the
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 20, 2007
                Can anyone tell me more about the British "trad jazz" scene?I vaguely remember some of the sides such as that 1959 tune "Petite Fleur";as I recall,the clarinetist was one Marty Sunshine.I am quite familiar with trumpeter who had that hit record-circa 1962-"Midnight in Moscow".I believe his name was Kenny Ball.It seems to me that his hit recordings were on the old KAPP label of the '50s and '60s.

                David Richoux <tubaman@...> wrote: Mere minutes before I got your e-mail I was just starting to read a
                used copy of "Mellymobile" (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket
                art by "Trog" - Wally Fawkes) that I had recently bought on Amazon.
                His description of the Trad Jazz scene in the 1950-1970s UK is
                hilarious!

                While I was on a UK tour in the 1990s I picked up a LP by John
                Chilton's Feet-Warmers in 1972 called "Nuts" (along with some other
                fun records by the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra jug band and others.)
                There is a great picture ( I assume it is one of George) on the back,
                with the caption "Wouldn't this photograph make a beautiful
                enlargement?" I had no idea of what I was getting - just bought it
                based on the picture and song selection... I was not disappointed!

                Humor and Jazz = Hokum
                (and that is a good thing!)
                Dave Richoux

                On Aug 14, 2007, at 3:27 PM, pdqblues wrote:

                > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
                > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
                > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
                > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
                >
                > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
                > off topic.
                >
                > Paul
                >






                ---------------------------------
                Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows.
                Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • David Brown
                Trad , in its various forms and in relation to the Revival generally, was discussed here earlier this year. Search with Bill Russell . [Non-text portions
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 21, 2007
                  'Trad', in its various forms and in relation to the 'Revival' generally, was
                  discussed here earlier this year. Search with 'Bill Russell'.




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Stuart MacBeth
                  Dear Dan The volume most relevant to subscribers to Red Hot Jazz is Jim Godbolt s excellent Jazz in Britain 1919-1950 published by The Northway Press. A second
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 21, 2007
                    Dear Dan

                    The volume most relevant to subscribers to Red Hot Jazz is Jim Godbolt's excellent Jazz in Britain 1919-1950 published by The Northway Press. A second edition of the book has recently become available.

                    Even better there is an accompanying 4-CD Set on the Proper label which showcases many American hot musicians like Adrian Rollini and Frank Guarante who made the trip across the Atlantic and worked and recorded in London.

                    Jim Godbolt's 1951-1970 covers the later and infinitely more commerical"Trad" movement in more detail alongisde excellent chapters on Ken Colyer and the rivalry between hot jazz fans and modernists which still rages today in certain quarters (i.e. my local pub on a Saturday night)!

                    Stuart



                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: Dan Van Landingham <danvanlandingham@...>
                    To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, 21 August, 2007 4:48:28 AM
                    Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] George Melly; British jazz singer; 80

                    Can anyone tell me more about the British "trad jazz" scene?I vaguely remember some of the sides such as that 1959 tune "Petite Fleur";as I recall,the clarinetist was one Marty Sunshine.I am quite familiar with trumpeter who had that hit record-circa 1962-"Midnight in Moscow".I believe his name was Kenny Ball.It seems to me that his hit recordings were on the old KAPP label of the '50s and '60s.

                    David Richoux <tubaman@tubatoast. com> wrote: Mere minutes before I got your e-mail I was just starting to read a
                    used copy of "Mellymobile" (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket
                    art by "Trog" - Wally Fawkes) that I had recently bought on Amazon.
                    His description of the Trad Jazz scene in the 1950-1970s UK is
                    hilarious!

                    While I was on a UK tour in the 1990s I picked up a LP by John
                    Chilton's Feet-Warmers in 1972 called "Nuts" (along with some other
                    fun records by the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra jug band and others.)
                    There is a great picture ( I assume it is one of George) on the back,
                    with the caption "Wouldn't this photograph make a beautiful
                    enlargement? " I had no idea of what I was getting - just bought it
                    based on the picture and song selection... I was not disappointed!

                    Humor and Jazz = Hokum
                    (and that is a good thing!)
                    Dave Richoux

                    On Aug 14, 2007, at 3:27 PM, pdqblues wrote:

                    > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
                    > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
                    > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
                    > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
                    >
                    > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
                    > off topic.
                    >
                    > Paul
                    >

                    ------------ --------- --------- ---
                    Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows.
                    Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    ___________________________________________________________
                    Yahoo! Answers - Got a question? Someone out there knows the answer. Try it
                    now.
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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Dan Van Landingham
                    Thank you for the information.It seems to me I had the album by Kenny Ball which included the 1962 hit Midnight in Moscow .As far as British bands go,I d like
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 21, 2007
                      Thank you for the information.It seems to me I had the album by Kenny Ball which included the 1962 hit "Midnight in Moscow".As far as British bands go,I'd like to find some information on leader Harry Roy.I bought an old British Decca back in the late '60s of "Barrel House Boogie".It was great;that band swung as opposed to the Lew Stone recording of "Canadian Capers" which I loved.The reverse,"Tiger Rag",sounded almost comical but it was a nice,clean band.Both are long gone and my personal history of British Decca is next to nil save the fact that when Jack and Dave Kapp(formerly of Brunswick Records)started "American Decca",they also were given the distribution of British Decca masters here in the U.S.I once saw some American Decca 78s of Gracie Fields whom I know little about.I didn't know that musicians were still waging the "mouldy fig" versus "modern jazz(bebop)" war.I liked both movements.They had more in common that either faction would care to admit.Either
                      way,Condon's autobiography describes both camps accurately:"We Called it Music".

                      Stuart MacBeth <stuartmacbeth@...> wrote: Dear Dan

                      The volume most relevant to subscribers to Red Hot Jazz is Jim Godbolt's excellent Jazz in Britain 1919-1950 published by The Northway Press. A second edition of the book has recently become available.

                      Even better there is an accompanying 4-CD Set on the Proper label which showcases many American hot musicians like Adrian Rollini and Frank Guarante who made the trip across the Atlantic and worked and recorded in London.

                      Jim Godbolt's 1951-1970 covers the later and infinitely more commerical"Trad" movement in more detail alongisde excellent chapters on Ken Colyer and the rivalry between hot jazz fans and modernists which still rages today in certain quarters (i.e. my local pub on a Saturday night)!

                      Stuart

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Dan Van Landingham <danvanlandingham@...>
                      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, 21 August, 2007 4:48:28 AM
                      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] George Melly; British jazz singer; 80

                      Can anyone tell me more about the British "trad jazz" scene?I vaguely remember some of the sides such as that 1959 tune "Petite Fleur";as I recall,the clarinetist was one Marty Sunshine.I am quite familiar with trumpeter who had that hit record-circa 1962-"Midnight in Moscow".I believe his name was Kenny Ball.It seems to me that his hit recordings were on the old KAPP label of the '50s and '60s.

                      David Richoux <tubaman@tubatoast. com> wrote: Mere minutes before I got your e-mail I was just starting to read a
                      used copy of "Mellymobile" (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket
                      art by "Trog" - Wally Fawkes) that I had recently bought on Amazon.
                      His description of the Trad Jazz scene in the 1950-1970s UK is
                      hilarious!

                      While I was on a UK tour in the 1990s I picked up a LP by John
                      Chilton's Feet-Warmers in 1972 called "Nuts" (along with some other
                      fun records by the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra jug band and others.)
                      There is a great picture ( I assume it is one of George) on the back,
                      with the caption "Wouldn't this photograph make a beautiful
                      enlargement? " I had no idea of what I was getting - just bought it
                      based on the picture and song selection... I was not disappointed!

                      Humor and Jazz = Hokum
                      (and that is a good thing!)
                      Dave Richoux

                      On Aug 14, 2007, at 3:27 PM, pdqblues wrote:

                      > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
                      > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
                      > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
                      > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
                      >
                      > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
                      > off topic.
                      >
                      > Paul
                      >

                      ------------ --------- --------- ---
                      Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows.
                      Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      __________________________________________________________
                      Yahoo! Answers - Got a question? Someone out there knows the answer. Try it
                      now.
                      http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                    • tc
                      I do happen to remember in Marty Scorsese s series on jazz four or five years ago that one of the ten (?) episodes was on skiffle, I believe, certainly on some
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 22, 2007
                        I do happen to remember in Marty Scorsese's series on jazz four or
                        five years ago that one of the ten (?) episodes was on skiffle, I
                        believe, certainly on some elements of the British jazz scene. Sorry,
                        I'm not particularly well-informed about jazz really, not really sure
                        if skiffle is really related to traditional jazz....anyway, just glad
                        to be able to contribute something to this wonderful group :)

                        todd



                        On 8/20/07, Dan Van Landingham <danvanlandingham@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Can anyone tell me more about the British "trad jazz" scene?I vaguely
                        > remember some of the sides such as that 1959 tune "Petite Fleur";as I
                        > recall,the clarinetist was one Marty Sunshine.I am quite familiar with
                        > trumpeter who had that hit record-circa 1962-"Midnight in Moscow".I believe
                        > his name was Kenny Ball.It seems to me that his hit recordings were on the
                        > old KAPP label of the '50s and '60s.
                        >
                        > David Richoux <tubaman@...> wrote: Mere minutes before I got your
                        > e-mail I was just starting to read a
                        > used copy of "Mellymobile" (by George Melly, 1982 with dust jacket
                        > art by "Trog" - Wally Fawkes) that I had recently bought on Amazon.
                        > His description of the Trad Jazz scene in the 1950-1970s UK is
                        > hilarious!
                        >
                        > While I was on a UK tour in the 1990s I picked up a LP by John
                        > Chilton's Feet-Warmers in 1972 called "Nuts" (along with some other
                        > fun records by the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra jug band and others.)
                        > There is a great picture ( I assume it is one of George) on the back,
                        > with the caption "Wouldn't this photograph make a beautiful
                        > enlargement?" I had no idea of what I was getting - just bought it
                        > based on the picture and song selection... I was not disappointed!
                        >
                        > Humor and Jazz = Hokum
                        > (and that is a good thing!)
                        > Dave Richoux
                        >
                        > On Aug 14, 2007, at 3:27 PM, pdqblues wrote:
                        >
                        > > At the risk of seemingly like the Grim Reaper, I post these obituaries
                        > > of those associated with historical jazz because there are so few of
                        > > these figures of jazz left. I also hope some interesting and useful
                        > > information can be gleaned from these obituaries.
                        > >
                        > > My apologies to those who are uninterested or who feel these posts are
                        > > off topic.
                        > >
                        > > Paul
                        > >
                        >
                        > ---------------------------------
                        > Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows.
                        > Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
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