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Obit: Johnny Frigo; versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90

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  • pdqblues
    http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070709/news_1m9frigo.html OBITUARY Johnny Frigo; versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90 ASSOCIATED PRESS July 9, 2007
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 10, 2007
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      http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070709/news_1m9frigo.html

      OBITUARY
      Johnny Frigo; versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90

      ASSOCIATED PRESS

      July 9, 2007

      Versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90

      Johnny Frigo, a versatile jazz violinist and bassist who toured with
      Jimmy Dorsey and co-wrote the jazz standard "Detour Ahead," has died,
      his son said. He was 90.

      Mr. Frigo died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after battling cancer
      in recent years, said his son Rick Frigo.

      Mr. Frigo was born on Chicago's South Side and spent much of his
      career playing bass. After playing with the U.S. Coast Guard band at
      Ellis Island during World War II, he toured with clarinetist Jimmy
      Dorsey and his orchestra.

      Around that time, Mr. Frigo wrote "Detour Ahead" with Lou Carter and
      Herb Ellis, a song that became a jazz standard recorded by Billie
      Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, among others.

      He was in his late 60s or early 70s when he turned his attention to
      the violin, appearing twice on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson."

      "Nobody played violin like him," said Rick Frigo. "Chicago's a poorer
      place without him."

      Mr. Frigo was also a poet and artist with a keen sense of humor, his
      son said. When Carson asked him why he'd waited so long to launch his
      jazz violin career, he replied that he didn't want there to be enough
      time for him to become a has-been, his son said.

      In addition to his son, Mr. Frigo is survived by his wife, Brittney
      Brown, and sister, Aurora Bray.

      (c) Copyright 2007 Union-Tribune Publishing Co. • A Copley Newspaper Site
    • Dan Van Landingham
      I ve never heard of him which is odd in that the alto saxophonist,Skeets Herfurt,was a good friend of mine for some ten years from 1982 til his death in April
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 11, 2007
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        I've never heard of him which is odd in that the alto saxophonist,Skeets Herfurt,was a good friend of mine for some ten years from 1982 'til his death in April of 1992:he died just a month and a half of his eighty-first birthday.The bass player I remember was Jim Taft who was with Jimmy Dorsey in the thirlties.What recordings did Mr.Frigo make?Again,I am not familiar with him as I had records of such jazz violinists as Paul Nero,Joe Venuti of course,Matty Malneck,Stephane Grappelly,Stuff Smith and Eddie South whose records I had on a couple of Victor 78s.
        pdqblues <PDQBlues@...> wrote: http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070709/news_1m9frigo.html

        OBITUARY
        Johnny Frigo; versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90

        ASSOCIATED PRESS

        July 9, 2007

        Versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90

        Johnny Frigo, a versatile jazz violinist and bassist who toured with
        Jimmy Dorsey and co-wrote the jazz standard "Detour Ahead," has died,
        his son said. He was 90.

        Mr. Frigo died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after battling cancer
        in recent years, said his son Rick Frigo.

        Mr. Frigo was born on Chicago's South Side and spent much of his
        career playing bass. After playing with the U.S. Coast Guard band at
        Ellis Island during World War II, he toured with clarinetist Jimmy
        Dorsey and his orchestra.

        Around that time, Mr. Frigo wrote "Detour Ahead" with Lou Carter and
        Herb Ellis, a song that became a jazz standard recorded by Billie
        Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, among others.

        He was in his late 60s or early 70s when he turned his attention to
        the violin, appearing twice on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson."

        "Nobody played violin like him," said Rick Frigo. "Chicago's a poorer
        place without him."

        Mr. Frigo was also a poet and artist with a keen sense of humor, his
        son said. When Carson asked him why he'd waited so long to launch his
        jazz violin career, he replied that he didn't want there to be enough
        time for him to become a has-been, his son said.

        In addition to his son, Mr. Frigo is survived by his wife, Brittney
        Brown, and sister, Aurora Bray.

        (c) Copyright 2007 Union-Tribune Publishing Co. • A Copley Newspaper Site






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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • heckman_michael
        ... saxophonist,Skeets Herfurt,was a good friend of mine for some ten years from 1982 til his death in April of 1992:he died just a month and a half of his
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 12, 2007
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          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Dan Van Landingham
          <danvanlandingham@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've never heard of him which is odd in that the alto
          saxophonist,Skeets Herfurt,was a good friend of mine for some ten
          years from 1982 'til his death in April of 1992:he died just a month
          and a half of his eighty-first birthday.The bass player I remember
          was Jim Taft who was with Jimmy Dorsey in the thirlties.What
          recordings did Mr.Frigo make?Again,I am not familiar with him as I
          had records of such jazz violinists as Paul Nero,Joe Venuti of
          course,Matty Malneck,Stephane Grappelly,Stuff Smith and Eddie South
          whose records I had on a couple of Victor 78s.
          > pdqblues <PDQBlues@...> wrote:
          http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070709/news_1m9frigo.html
          >
          >


          www.johnnyfrigo.com/discography


          Another nonagenarian violinist was Claude Williams, born 1908,
          recorded with Andy Kirk in 1929, played with Basie until 1937 when
          John Hammond decided a violin did not fit his concept of what the
          band should sound like. I have only one album of his: "Swingin' the
          Blues" recorded in 1999 and released on the Bullseye label.
        • Robert Dewar
          He was just featured last night in the (excellent) documentary on PBS chronicling the career of Les Paul. It was so interesting to watch. He sounds like a
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 12, 2007
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            He was just featured last night in the (excellent) documentary on PBS
            chronicling the career of Les Paul. It was so interesting to watch.

            He sounds like a funny guy..that quote on the Carson show is priceless..

            RIP...

            Robert J Dewar

            On 7/10/07, pdqblues <PDQBlues@...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070709/news_1m9frigo.html
            >
            > OBITUARY
            > Johnny Frigo; versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90
            >
            > ASSOCIATED PRESS
            >
            > July 9, 2007
            >
            > Versatile jazz bassist, violinist; 90
            >
            > Johnny Frigo, a versatile jazz violinist and bassist who toured with
            > Jimmy Dorsey and co-wrote the jazz standard "Detour Ahead," has died,
            > his son said. He was 90.
            >
            > Mr. Frigo died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after battling cancer
            > in recent years, said his son Rick Frigo.
            >
            > Mr. Frigo was born on Chicago's South Side and spent much of his
            > career playing bass. After playing with the U.S. Coast Guard band at
            > Ellis Island during World War II, he toured with clarinetist Jimmy
            > Dorsey and his orchestra.
            >
            > Around that time, Mr. Frigo wrote "Detour Ahead" with Lou Carter and
            > Herb Ellis, a song that became a jazz standard recorded by Billie
            > Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, among others.
            >
            > He was in his late 60s or early 70s when he turned his attention to
            > the violin, appearing twice on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson."
            >
            > "Nobody played violin like him," said Rick Frigo. "Chicago's a poorer
            > place without him."
            >
            > Mr. Frigo was also a poet and artist with a keen sense of humor, his
            > son said. When Carson asked him why he'd waited so long to launch his
            > jazz violin career, he replied that he didn't want there to be enough
            > time for him to become a has-been, his son said.
            >
            > In addition to his son, Mr. Frigo is survived by his wife, Brittney
            > Brown, and sister, Aurora Bray.
            >
            > (c) Copyright 2007 Union-Tribune Publishing Co. � A Copley Newspaper Site
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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