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Re: A question for you

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  • spacelights
    ... the May 7 1927 Hot 7 recording of Wild Man Blues is accredited to both Jelly and Louis (recorded by the Red Hot Peppers less than a month later on June 4).
    Message 1 of 3 , May 20, 2007
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      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Hugh Crozier <jellyrollstomp@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > It was not the first time Louis and Jelly were combined by Melrose;
      the May 7 1927 Hot 7 recording of Wild Man Blues is accredited to both
      Jelly and Louis (recorded by the Red Hot Peppers less than a month
      later on June 4). I think I have been told that this joint
      accreditation was just a way of getting Armstrong's name as a composer
      onto the label, and that there was no collaboration. I am sure someone
      out there knows the truth. I'm not sure what the status - if any - of
      the relationship between Morton and Armstrong was.
      >

      from 'Oh, Mister Jelly' - A Jelly Roll Morton Scrapbook' by William
      Russell --

      Louis Armstrong

      In a brief interview on May 5, 1970, Louis discussed the composition
      "Wild Man Blues", which is credited to both Jelly Roll and Armstrong.
      "That was a good number, but I didn't write none of that. I just
      played it."

      "I never played no gigs nor jobs with Jelly and we didn't make no
      records together. You know, Jelly was always somewhere else, like
      California. I never knew Jelly Roll in New Orleans. He'd gone when I
      cut out from New Orleans, but I heard so much talk about him, and I'd
      heard the Jelly Roll Blues and all that. I never did run across him
      too much when I was in Chicago, from 1923 to 1930. But I always
      followed his music. I always picked up on him--Jelly was my man."

      ... When asked if he recalled the time Zutty mentioned in his
      interview, when they met Jelly, who went home with Louis to play on
      his new grand piano, he replied:

      "I do, I do remember--that was a Baldwin I bought for Lil. What Jelly
      was playing then is good right now. The piano players still love his
      music today, you know what I mean. I think you can derive a whole lot
      from him."

      ... When Louis Armstrong reviewed Lomax's 'Mr. Jelly Roll' for the New
      York Times Book Review, Sunday, June 18, 1950, he also stated, "I
      didn't meet Jelly Roll until the early Twenties in Chicago, as he left
      New Orleans way before I got to play music."
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