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jazz fiddle vs. jazz violin?

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  • blidgood
    Hey y all, It looks like I m stepping into a bit of a e-disaster zone, but I ll try my question anyhow: Anyone have any thoughts or leads on players or groups
    Message 1 of 3 , May 16, 2005
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      Hey y'all,

      It looks like I'm stepping into a bit of a e-disaster zone, but I'll try my question anyhow:

      Anyone have any thoughts or leads on players or groups who brought a rougher string
      sound to early jazz--and, importantly, to a recording studio or within range of a
      descriptive writer?

      A lot of historians bring up the classical angle--how Eddie south, Stuff Smith, and George
      Morrison all had European Art Music Cred...but I'm trying to think and write about how the
      centuries-old tradition of Af-Am/black fiddle playing would have played into the violin's
      involvement in and then gradual disappearance from jazz, and how this influence has
      been effaced by historical narratives that emphasize virtuosity of a more "classical" nature
      over a rougher sound.

      Those of you who might not know but are curious should as a first step check out Old Hat
      records and their excellent collections of African-American fiddle music, a good deal of
      which is jazz flavored, or at least rag-heavy. I'm currently fascinated with a Virginia group
      called the "Bubbling-Over Five" and their "Get Up Off That Jazzophone" of 1929..."Mr. Spitz
      don't be so mean / I can stand all your violin / but man, get up off that Jazzophone..."

      peace,

      Lee
    • Andrew Homzy
      Dear Lee, Something else you may want to consider is the adoption of the violin in Cuba and South America by black musicians. For jazz violin, I hope you are
      Message 2 of 3 , May 16, 2005
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        Dear Lee,

        Something else you may want to consider is the adoption of the violin in
        Cuba and South America by black musicians.

        For jazz violin, I hope you are aware of the following:

        http://www.abar.net/

        Cheers,

        Andrew Homzy, Montréal

        > From: blidgood <blidgood@...>
        > Reply-To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 13:36:02 +0000
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [RedHotJazz] jazz fiddle vs. jazz violin?
        >
        >
        >
        > Hey y'all,
        >
        > It looks like I'm stepping into a bit of a e-disaster zone, but I'll try my
        > question anyhow:
        >
        > Anyone have any thoughts or leads on players or groups who brought a rougher
        > string
        > sound to early jazz--and, importantly, to a recording studio or within range
        > of a
        > descriptive writer?
        >
        > A lot of historians bring up the classical angle--how Eddie south, Stuff
        > Smith, and George
        > Morrison all had European Art Music Cred...but I'm trying to think and write
        > about how the
        > centuries-old tradition of Af-Am/black fiddle playing would have played into
        > the violin's
        > involvement in and then gradual disappearance from jazz, and how this
        > influence has
        > been effaced by historical narratives that emphasize virtuosity of a more
        > "classical" nature
        > over a rougher sound.
        >
        > Those of you who might not know but are curious should as a first step check
        > out Old Hat
        > records and their excellent collections of African-American fiddle music, a
        > good deal of
        > which is jazz flavored, or at least rag-heavy. I'm currently fascinated with
        > a Virginia group
        > called the "Bubbling-Over Five" and their "Get Up Off That Jazzophone" of
        > 1929..."Mr. Spitz
        > don't be so mean / I can stand all your violin / but man, get up off that
        > Jazzophone..."
        >
        > peace,
        >
        > Lee
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Howard Rye
        I presume you ve considered the Louisville tradition. If not, the complete Dixieland Jug Blowers can be had in superior sound dubbed by John R.T. Davies on
        Message 3 of 3 , May 16, 2005
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          I presume you've considered the Louisville tradition.

          If not, the complete Dixieland Jug Blowers can be had in superior sound
          dubbed by John R.T. Davies on Frog DGF6 Louisville Stomp and the complete
          Clifford Hayes Louisville Stompers on Frog DFG10 Frog Hop.

          Those Memphis Jug band tracks whoch feature Milton Robie on fiddle are also
          relevant here (also available from Frog).

          Less obvious perhaps is the Booker Orchestra's Gennett 6375, which is in at
          least some editions of Rust though badly misinterpreted (the fiddler is Jim
          Booker and they are nothing to do with alto player Charles Booker). This
          disc raises a lot of unresolved issues about cultural interactions! Salty
          Dog is on Document DOCD5216 Too Late, Too Late, Vol.2, Camp Nelson Blues on
          DOCD5167 String Bands, which has a lot of other material seemingly relevant
          to your inquiry including the Kansas City Blues Strummers Vocalion.

          Anthony Barnett's web site will put you on to the amazing Angelina Rivera,
          who can be heard on four of Josephine Baker's French Odeons (also somewhere
          in the Document catalogue thanks to our decision to include them in Blues &
          Gospel Records). These are not in Rust because he believes them to be of no
          jazz interest. One hopes this means he hasn't heard them. Rivera was
          actually from the Dominican Republic according to what she told U.K.
          immigration in 1919, but this is all on Anthony's web-site somewhere.



          Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          howard@...
          Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
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