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Re: Guy Kelly

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  • Robert Greenwood
    ... Kelly was a very talented player. Like his friend Punch Miller he gave credence to the argument that, great as he undoubtedly was, Louis Armstrong was not
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
      > From what I've heard so far (and that's what aroused my curiosity)
      Kelly was a very talented player. Like his friend Punch Miller he
      gave credence to the argument that, great as he undoubtedly was,
      Louis Armstrong was not the only catfish in the New Orlean sea!
      > I well recall one of the old New Orleans players telling me
      that "Armstrong was a great player, but Punch had the fastest
      fingers."
      > Anyone who listens to those trio recordings that John Steiner made -
      particularly High Society - would have to agree.
      > Who's next?
      > Tig Chambers?
      > B.T. Wingfield?
      > Horsecollar Draper?
      > Murph Steinberg?
      > Martin Finn?
      > And thanks, Robert, or your assistance on Guy...
      > Tony Standish


      My pleasure, Tony. Our friend Michael Rader also contributed some
      very useful information.
      For those interested in the Punch Miller tracks referred to by Tony,
      they can be found on Prelude to the Revival Volume 1 on AMCD-40.
      This CD consists of non-commercial recordings made in New Orleans
      from 1937 – 1941 (rescued from obscurity by Barry Martyn) and gives
      us a brief, tantalising, and largely lo-fi glimpse into a lost
      period, as far as recording was concerned, for New Orleans music,
      although the Punch tracks, made in Chicago, have reasonably good
      sound. The bands featured include Kid Howard's Band, Andy Anderson's
      Pelican State Jazz Band, the line –up of which includes one Leonard
      Mitchell on guitar and vocal, presumably the same Leonard Mitchell
      who plays banjo and sings on the 1927 Louis Dumaine Victors, Duke
      Derbigny's Orchestra, Joe Thomas' Dixieland Band, and the Punch
      Miller session recorded at the H&T Tavern, Chicago on 28th January
      1941. Recent comments in defence of William Russell notwithstanding,
      none of the bands featured on this CD sounds anything like a
      revivalist band. The sleeve includes a photograph of Kid Howard's pre-
      war band with Howard wearing a very cool pair of two-tone shoes and
      standing next to a sign that assures us that as long as the kitty is
      kept well-fed, the band will play any tune requested. Contrast this,
      if you will, with the list of approved tunes painted on the wall
      behind the bar at the Dawn Club.
      Robert Greenwood.
    • ikey100
      I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the possible trumpet on a 1935 Art Tatum session in Chicago ( Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle ), with the rest of the
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
        I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the "possible" trumpet on a 1935 Art
        Tatum session in Chicago ("Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle"), with
        the rest of the band unknown. Does anyone know the basis, other than
        the location, for this speculative attribution?

        Warren
      • Michael Rader
        Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article by Chris Hillman in the
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
          Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article by Chris Hillman in the online Jazz Gazette (thejazzgazette.be):

          "... an obscure title by the pianist Art Tatum, who normally preferred to play solo. This one was never issued, and has only turned up via a test pressing. On examination, it seems to be the same group as the one in which Kelly recorded a month later with Albert Ammons, though with the pianist and leader replaced by Tatum. That would make Delbert Bright his partner on clarinet and alto, with Ike Perkins guitar, Israel Crosby bass and Jimmy Hoskins on drums. The title Take Me Back To My Boots and Saddle indicates that the vocal is not to be taken seriously."

          Michael Rader

          > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
          > Von: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Gesendet: 04.04.07 20:05:09
          > An: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Betreff: [RedHotJazz] Re: Guy Kelly


          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the "possible" trumpet on a 1935 Art
          > Tatum session in Chicago ("Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle"), with
          > the rest of the band unknown. Does anyone know the basis, other than
          > the location, for this speculative attribution?
          >
          > Warren
          >
          >
          >
          >


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        • ikey100
          Indeed, I somehow missed it in your earlier post, Micheal. Thanks for the reply. Warren ... place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
            Indeed, I somehow missed it in your earlier post, Micheal. Thanks for
            the reply.

            Warren

            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Michael Rader <Rader.Michael@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in
            place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article
            by Chris Hillman in the online Jazz Gazette (thejazzgazette.be):
            >
            > "... an obscure title by the pianist Art Tatum, who normally
            preferred to play solo. This one was never issued, and has only
            turned up via a test pressing. On examination, it seems to be the
            same group as the one in which Kelly recorded a month later with
            Albert Ammons, though with the pianist and leader replaced by Tatum.
            That would make Delbert Bright his partner on clarinet and alto, with
            Ike Perkins guitar, Israel Crosby bass and Jimmy Hoskins on drums.
            The title Take Me Back To My Boots and Saddle indicates that the
            vocal is not to be taken seriously."
            >
            > Michael Rader
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