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Guy Kelly

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  • Robert Greenwood
    Tony Standish wrote: Anyone out there got any material on Guy Kelly? Here, cobbled together from Chilton, Charters, and the New Grove is what I ve been able
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 23, 2007
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      Tony Standish wrote: "Anyone out there got any material on Guy Kelly?"
      Here, cobbled together from Chilton, Charters, and the New Grove is
      what I've been able to find.
      The trumpeter Edgar Guy Kelly was born in Scotlandville, Louisiana on
      22nd December 1906. He played with Toots Johnson's band in Baton
      Rouge, then toured Texas before settling in New Orleans where he
      worked during 1927 and 1928, replacing Ricard Alexis as second
      trumpeter with Oscar Celestin. This included a residency in Mobile,
      Alabama. On 13th December 1928 the Celestin band recorded two numbers
      for Columbia: Sweetheart of TKO, and Ta-Ta Daddy. It is, I think,
      Kelly who plays the first of the two trumpet breaks on Ta-Ta Daddy.
      In 1929 Kelly, deputising for Percy Humphrey, toured with a band led
      by trumpeter Avery Kid Howard. After this tour, Kelly left for
      Chicago.
      Summer 1930: Toured with Boyd Atkins' Firecrackers.
      1931: Worked with pianist Cassino Simpson's band.
      1932: With Ed Carry.
      1934: Played with Erskine Tate, Dave Peyton, Tiny Parham, Carroll
      Dickerson, and Jimmie Noone.
      1935-36: Worked with Albert Ammons.
      February 1937: With Carroll Dickerson's big band.
      Early 1938: With Erskine Tate at the Coliseum.
      Played various gigs in Chicago until early 1939. Worked his last
      regular gig with Albert Ammons.
      Kelly made very few recordings. There are two sessions for Vocalion
      made in Chicago: 23rd June 1933, and 29th July 1933 with Frankie Half-
      Pint Jaxon. I have not yet heard these records so I don't know if he
      solos on any of them.
      On 15th January 1936 he recorded four sides with Jimmie Noone. These
      tracks were released on Parlaphone and are generally considered to
      contain the finest recorded examples of his work.
      13th & 14th February he recorded for Decca with Albert Ammons.
      In his sleevenote to Collectors' Items 022, Chris Hillman is
      convinced that Kelly is the trumpeter heard on a session made in
      Chicago on 7th October 1939 for Vocalion by Lizzie Miles and the
      Melrose Stompers.
      Guy Kelly died in Chicago on 24th February 1940.

      Robert Greenwood.
    • Tony Standish
      Thanks, Robert, for the Guy Kelly details. There is only one trumpet solo on the Half-Pint Jaxon tracks. It s on Spank it . The CD lists probably Bob
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 25, 2007
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        Thanks, Robert, for the Guy Kelly details.
        There is only one trumpet solo on the Half-Pint Jaxon tracks. It's on 'Spank
        it". The CD lists "probably" Bob Shoffner, George Mitchell and Guy Kelly -
        it doesn't sound like Mitchell, but it could be either of the others.
        There's more horn behind the vocal in the closing stages of "Mama don't
        allow", but it's difficult to tell just who it is.
        The Kelly file is growing - Milt Hinton talks about him in an article from
        the Jazz Institute in Chicago, Pops Foster mentions him, and I've culled a
        morsel of information from Downbeat.com. Will hopefully keep it growing
        If only Joohn Steiner was still around....
        Tony Standish
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Robert Greenwood" <robertgreenwood_54uk@...>
        To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 10:30 PM
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Guy Kelly


        > Tony Standish wrote: "Anyone out there got any material on Guy Kelly?"
        > Here, cobbled together from Chilton, Charters, and the New Grove is
        > what I've been able to find.
        > The trumpeter Edgar Guy Kelly was born in Scotlandville, Louisiana on
        > 22nd December 1906. He played with Toots Johnson's band in Baton
        > Rouge, then toured Texas before settling in New Orleans where he
        > worked during 1927 and 1928, replacing Ricard Alexis as second
        > trumpeter with Oscar Celestin. This included a residency in Mobile,
        > Alabama. On 13th December 1928 the Celestin band recorded two numbers
        > for Columbia: Sweetheart of TKO, and Ta-Ta Daddy. It is, I think,
        > Kelly who plays the first of the two trumpet breaks on Ta-Ta Daddy.
        > In 1929 Kelly, deputising for Percy Humphrey, toured with a band led
        > by trumpeter Avery Kid Howard. After this tour, Kelly left for
        > Chicago.
        > Summer 1930: Toured with Boyd Atkins' Firecrackers.
        > 1931: Worked with pianist Cassino Simpson's band.
        > 1932: With Ed Carry.
        > 1934: Played with Erskine Tate, Dave Peyton, Tiny Parham, Carroll
        > Dickerson, and Jimmie Noone.
        > 1935-36: Worked with Albert Ammons.
        > February 1937: With Carroll Dickerson's big band.
        > Early 1938: With Erskine Tate at the Coliseum.
        > Played various gigs in Chicago until early 1939. Worked his last
        > regular gig with Albert Ammons.
        > Kelly made very few recordings. There are two sessions for Vocalion
        > made in Chicago: 23rd June 1933, and 29th July 1933 with Frankie Half-
        > Pint Jaxon. I have not yet heard these records so I don't know if he
        > solos on any of them.
        > On 15th January 1936 he recorded four sides with Jimmie Noone. These
        > tracks were released on Parlaphone and are generally considered to
        > contain the finest recorded examples of his work.
        > 13th & 14th February he recorded for Decca with Albert Ammons.
        > In his sleevenote to Collectors' Items 022, Chris Hillman is
        > convinced that Kelly is the trumpeter heard on a session made in
        > Chicago on 7th October 1939 for Vocalion by Lizzie Miles and the
        > Melrose Stompers.
        > Guy Kelly died in Chicago on 24th February 1940.
        >
        > Robert Greenwood.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Michael Rader
        Tony, all, A little more information on Guy Kelly: There s a photo of him in the Rose/Souchon New Orleans Jazz Family album. There is also quite an extensive
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 26, 2007
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          Tony, all,

          A little more information on Guy Kelly:

          There's a photo of him in the Rose/Souchon New Orleans Jazz Family album.

          There is also quite an extensive note on Kelly in the notes to the Meritt double album on Joe Robichaux, which also has the session by Albert Ammons' Rhythm Kings with Kelly. The liner note write, Herb Friedwald, credits an article on Kelly by Paige Van Vorst inthe March 1976 issue of the Mississippi Rag.

          From the liner notes, a few snippets:

          Kelly's given name seems to have been Edgar (Pops Foster). His birthplace, Scotlandville, was a suburb of Baton Rouge. Celestin gave Kelly his first job in New Orleans

          He was offered a job by King Oliver, mentioned in a letter to Bunk Johnson, in which Oliver offered the job to Johnson. In New Orleans, Kelly was considered the best trumpeter of the post-Armstrong generation: Lee Collins was a poor reader, Red Allen still lacked imagination.

          Kelly was a heavy drinker and difficult as a person (according to "Little Dad" Vincent, who hung around with Kelly in New Orleans) - Johnny Wiggs tried to set up arecording session for him, but abondoned efforts due to these difficulties.

          He was well-advertised in Chicago and didn't ave difficulties in finding jobs, though few of them were steady. His best job was with Albert Ammons, where he was heard by Bill Russell, who described the band as "as powerful as a 14 piece band". John Hammond selected for the Jimmie Noone date on the strength of his playing with Ammons. The Ammons band with Art Tatum in the piano seat in place of Ammons recorded "Take Me Back To My Boots and Saddle", which was issued for the first time on a Jerry Valburn Jazz Archives LP.

          Milt Hinton tried to help Kelly with his alcohol problem and had arranged for him to play with Cab Calloway. Kelly died before he could take up the appointment. He died after contracting pneumonia after playing a jam session in February, being weakened by his fondeness for drink. He was 35 when he died and Punch Miller played taps at his funeral.

          Michael Rader
          Karlsruhe,
          Germany


          > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
          > Von: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Gesendet: 26.03.07 08:21:34
          > An: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
          > Betreff: Re: [RedHotJazz] Guy Kelly


          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Thanks, Robert, for the Guy Kelly details.
          > There is only one trumpet solo on the Half-Pint Jaxon tracks. It's on 'Spank
          > it". The CD lists "probably" Bob Shoffner, George Mitchell and Guy Kelly -
          > it doesn't sound like Mitchell, but it could be either of the others.
          > There's more horn behind the vocal in the closing stages of "Mama don't
          > allow", but it's difficult to tell just who it is.
          > The Kelly file is growing - Milt Hinton talks about him in an article from
          > the Jazz Institute in Chicago, Pops Foster mentions him, and I've culled a
          > morsel of information from Downbeat.com. Will hopefully keep it growing
          > If only Joohn Steiner was still around....
          > Tony Standish
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Robert Greenwood" <robertgreenwood_54uk@...>
          > To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 10:30 PM
          > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Guy Kelly
          >
          > > Tony Standish wrote: "Anyone out there got any material on Guy Kelly?"
          > > Here, cobbled together from Chilton, Charters, and the New Grove is
          > > what I've been able to find.
          > > The trumpeter Edgar Guy Kelly was born in Scotlandville, Louisiana on
          > > 22nd December 1906. He played with Toots Johnson's band in Baton
          > > Rouge, then toured Texas before settling in New Orleans where he
          > > worked during 1927 and 1928, replacing Ricard Alexis as second
          > > trumpeter with Oscar Celestin. This included a residency in Mobile,
          > > Alabama. On 13th December 1928 the Celestin band recorded two numbers
          > > for Columbia: Sweetheart of TKO, and Ta-Ta Daddy. It is, I think,
          > > Kelly who plays the first of the two trumpet breaks on Ta-Ta Daddy.
          > > In 1929 Kelly, deputising for Percy Humphrey, toured with a band led
          > > by trumpeter Avery Kid Howard. After this tour, Kelly left for
          > > Chicago.
          > > Summer 1930: Toured with Boyd Atkins' Firecrackers.
          > > 1931: Worked with pianist Cassino Simpson's band.
          > > 1932: With Ed Carry.
          > > 1934: Played with Erskine Tate, Dave Peyton, Tiny Parham, Carroll
          > > Dickerson, and Jimmie Noone.
          > > 1935-36: Worked with Albert Ammons.
          > > February 1937: With Carroll Dickerson's big band.
          > > Early 1938: With Erskine Tate at the Coliseum.
          > > Played various gigs in Chicago until early 1939. Worked his last
          > > regular gig with Albert Ammons.
          > > Kelly made very few recordings. There are two sessions for Vocalion
          > > made in Chicago: 23rd June 1933, and 29th July 1933 with Frankie Half-
          > > Pint Jaxon. I have not yet heard these records so I don't know if he
          > > solos on any of them.
          > > On 15th January 1936 he recorded four sides with Jimmie Noone. These
          > > tracks were released on Parlaphone and are generally considered to
          > > contain the finest recorded examples of his work.
          > > 13th & 14th February he recorded for Decca with Albert Ammons.
          > > In his sleevenote to Collectors' Items 022, Chris Hillman is
          > > convinced that Kelly is the trumpeter heard on a session made in
          > > Chicago on 7th October 1939 for Vocalion by Lizzie Miles and the
          > > Melrose Stompers.
          > > Guy Kelly died in Chicago on 24th February 1940.
          > >
          > > Robert Greenwood.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >


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        • Tony Standish
          Peter Haby has sent me a photocopy of an excellent article by Paige van Vorst in Miss. Rag, March 1976, on Guy Kelly. Quite exhuastive and I doubt if, all
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 3, 2007
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            Peter Haby has sent me a photocopy of an excellent article by Paige van Vorst in Miss. Rag, March 1976, on Guy Kelly. Quite exhuastive and I doubt if, all these years later, my limited talent for research can add very much.
            However, I've added Paige's work to the file. I've started to collate the known and "possible" recorded examples of Guy's workand will report further as I go along.
            From what I've heard so far (and that's what aroused my curiosity) Kelly was a very talented player. Like his friend Punch Miller he gave credence to the argument that, great as he undoubtedly was, Louis Armstrong was not the only catfish in the New Orlean sea!
            I well recall one of the old New Orleans players telling me that "Armstrong was a great player, but Punch had the fastest fingers."
            Anyone who listens to those trio recordings that John Steiner made - particularly High Society - would have to agree.
            Who's next?
            Tig Chambers?
            B.T. Wingfield?
            Horsecollar Draper?
            Murph Steinberg?
            Martin Finn?
            And thanks, Robert, or your assistance on Guy...
            Tony Standish




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robert Greenwood
            ... Kelly was a very talented player. Like his friend Punch Miller he gave credence to the argument that, great as he undoubtedly was, Louis Armstrong was not
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
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              > From what I've heard so far (and that's what aroused my curiosity)
              Kelly was a very talented player. Like his friend Punch Miller he
              gave credence to the argument that, great as he undoubtedly was,
              Louis Armstrong was not the only catfish in the New Orlean sea!
              > I well recall one of the old New Orleans players telling me
              that "Armstrong was a great player, but Punch had the fastest
              fingers."
              > Anyone who listens to those trio recordings that John Steiner made -
              particularly High Society - would have to agree.
              > Who's next?
              > Tig Chambers?
              > B.T. Wingfield?
              > Horsecollar Draper?
              > Murph Steinberg?
              > Martin Finn?
              > And thanks, Robert, or your assistance on Guy...
              > Tony Standish


              My pleasure, Tony. Our friend Michael Rader also contributed some
              very useful information.
              For those interested in the Punch Miller tracks referred to by Tony,
              they can be found on Prelude to the Revival Volume 1 on AMCD-40.
              This CD consists of non-commercial recordings made in New Orleans
              from 1937 – 1941 (rescued from obscurity by Barry Martyn) and gives
              us a brief, tantalising, and largely lo-fi glimpse into a lost
              period, as far as recording was concerned, for New Orleans music,
              although the Punch tracks, made in Chicago, have reasonably good
              sound. The bands featured include Kid Howard's Band, Andy Anderson's
              Pelican State Jazz Band, the line –up of which includes one Leonard
              Mitchell on guitar and vocal, presumably the same Leonard Mitchell
              who plays banjo and sings on the 1927 Louis Dumaine Victors, Duke
              Derbigny's Orchestra, Joe Thomas' Dixieland Band, and the Punch
              Miller session recorded at the H&T Tavern, Chicago on 28th January
              1941. Recent comments in defence of William Russell notwithstanding,
              none of the bands featured on this CD sounds anything like a
              revivalist band. The sleeve includes a photograph of Kid Howard's pre-
              war band with Howard wearing a very cool pair of two-tone shoes and
              standing next to a sign that assures us that as long as the kitty is
              kept well-fed, the band will play any tune requested. Contrast this,
              if you will, with the list of approved tunes painted on the wall
              behind the bar at the Dawn Club.
              Robert Greenwood.
            • ikey100
              I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the possible trumpet on a 1935 Art Tatum session in Chicago ( Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle ), with the rest of the
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
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                I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the "possible" trumpet on a 1935 Art
                Tatum session in Chicago ("Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle"), with
                the rest of the band unknown. Does anyone know the basis, other than
                the location, for this speculative attribution?

                Warren
              • Michael Rader
                Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article by Chris Hillman in the
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
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                  Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article by Chris Hillman in the online Jazz Gazette (thejazzgazette.be):

                  "... an obscure title by the pianist Art Tatum, who normally preferred to play solo. This one was never issued, and has only turned up via a test pressing. On examination, it seems to be the same group as the one in which Kelly recorded a month later with Albert Ammons, though with the pianist and leader replaced by Tatum. That would make Delbert Bright his partner on clarinet and alto, with Ike Perkins guitar, Israel Crosby bass and Jimmy Hoskins on drums. The title Take Me Back To My Boots and Saddle indicates that the vocal is not to be taken seriously."

                  Michael Rader

                  > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
                  > Von: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  > Gesendet: 04.04.07 20:05:09
                  > An: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  > Betreff: [RedHotJazz] Re: Guy Kelly


                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I have seen Guy Kelly listed as the "possible" trumpet on a 1935 Art
                  > Tatum session in Chicago ("Take Me Back To My Boots And Saddle"), with
                  > the rest of the band unknown. Does anyone know the basis, other than
                  > the location, for this speculative attribution?
                  >
                  > Warren
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


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                • ikey100
                  Indeed, I somehow missed it in your earlier post, Micheal. Thanks for the reply. Warren ... place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 4, 2007
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                    Indeed, I somehow missed it in your earlier post, Micheal. Thanks for
                    the reply.

                    Warren

                    --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Michael Rader <Rader.Michael@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Well, I did say that it was the Ammons Rhythm Kings with Tatum in
                    place of Ammons in my recent mail on Kelly. The source was an article
                    by Chris Hillman in the online Jazz Gazette (thejazzgazette.be):
                    >
                    > "... an obscure title by the pianist Art Tatum, who normally
                    preferred to play solo. This one was never issued, and has only
                    turned up via a test pressing. On examination, it seems to be the
                    same group as the one in which Kelly recorded a month later with
                    Albert Ammons, though with the pianist and leader replaced by Tatum.
                    That would make Delbert Bright his partner on clarinet and alto, with
                    Ike Perkins guitar, Israel Crosby bass and Jimmy Hoskins on drums.
                    The title Take Me Back To My Boots and Saddle indicates that the
                    vocal is not to be taken seriously."
                    >
                    > Michael Rader
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