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Re: [RedHotJazz] Digest Number 627

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  • PDQBlues@aol.com
    Uhm, my apologies for making what may have been an inappropriate analogy. But heck, I never took Latin nor did well in my English course work either. :D What I
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 20, 2007
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      Uhm, my apologies for making what may have been an inappropriate analogy.
      But heck, I never took Latin nor did well in my English course work either. :D

      What I was attempting (maybe feebly) was to covey the idea the Jazz, like
      languages, changes over time because the people who play and listen to it change,
      too. Our value systems are different from 100 years ago, our lives are very
      different. And, most profoundly, our feelings of how we perceive and sense
      things and reality are different.

      Based on my hearing of the music, it is my opinion that the 20s were a period
      of hope and joy about the present and future whereas today we have pessimism
      and a lack of hope that seems to be very prevalent -- but that may be my
      perception. Yet it is that "happier" feeling that I find so attractive about Jazz
      while I know many others find that same feeling in this music negatively.

      So, for me, Jazz is type of music that evokes certain feelings from me that I
      do not find from other styles. And although I do enjoy many kinds of music,
      my heart continues to stay with Jazz.

      Paul F.


      In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com writes:


      I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
      is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
      (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
      anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
      knowledge of earlier jazz forms?

      Paul F.


      In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com writes:


      I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
      is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
      (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
      anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
      knowledge of earlier jazz forms?




      **************************************
      AOL now offers free email to everyone.
      Find out more about what's free from AOL at http://www.aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rick Hensel
      I agree, Paul. I think Jazz in the 20 s and 30 s had a more positive attitude--an uplifting quality to it, because conditions of everyday life were worse
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 20, 2007
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        I agree, Paul. I think Jazz in the 20's and 30's had a more "positive" attitude--an "uplifting" quality to it, because conditions of everyday life were worse and the expression of, and reaction to, the music was more of a "coping mechanism". The 40's and 50's brought on a different attitude--a feeling that things were "better than before". That gave "license" to more experimentation in music; which, of course, is always good and bad to some degree.

        I personally feel that creating new music from the old is not always an advancement--as society likes to believe that everything evolves to a better thing (not true at all)--that it is just different. In Jazz music's case, definitely not better, overall. I see Dixieland, Hot, Swing, bebop, West Coast, Latin, Fusion, etc. as different kinds of music (not all true jazz); and I favor the first three as far more likeable than the rest, and the 1900-1936 era as the time when "true" Jazz was first played in our country.

        Rick H.



        PDQBlues@... wrote:
        Uhm, my apologies for making what may have been an inappropriate analogy.
        But heck, I never took Latin nor did well in my English course work either. :D

        What I was attempting (maybe feebly) was to covey the idea the Jazz, like
        languages, changes over time because the people who play and listen to it change,
        too. Our value systems are different from 100 years ago, our lives are very
        different. And, most profoundly, our feelings of how we perceive and sense
        things and reality are different.

        Based on my hearing of the music, it is my opinion that the 20s were a period
        of hope and joy about the present and future whereas today we have pessimism
        and a lack of hope that seems to be very prevalent -- but that may be my
        perception. Yet it is that "happier" feeling that I find so attractive about Jazz
        while I know many others find that same feeling in this music negatively.

        So, for me, Jazz is type of music that evokes certain feelings from me that I
        do not find from other styles. And although I do enjoy many kinds of music,
        my heart continues to stay with Jazz.

        Paul F.

        In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com writes:

        I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
        is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
        (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
        anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
        knowledge of earlier jazz forms?

        Paul F.

        In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com writes:

        I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
        is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
        (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
        anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
        knowledge of earlier jazz forms?

        **************************************
        AOL now offers free email to everyone.
        Find out more about what's free from AOL at http://www.aol.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        ---------------------------------
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        Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Albert Haim
        In jest, (but not completely), I often state that jazz died on Aug 6, 1931, the day Bix died. The jazz and hot dance music from the 1920s had a freshness, a
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 20, 2007
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          In jest, (but not completely), I often state that jazz died on Aug 6,
          1931, the day Bix died. The jazz and hot dance music from the 1920s
          had a freshness, a joyful attitude (as Rick tells us), a spontaneity,
          a creativity that, to my ears, is absent, with many exceptions in
          swing, and with few, if any, exceptions after that. Dixieland revival
          was an attempt to go back to the roots of the 1920s, but in my
          opinion, it failed â€"the beat is wrong, the solos unimaginative, etc. A
          few contemporary bands do an excellent job of recreating the freshness
          and spirit of the music from the 1920s, but, unfortunately, and I am
          sorry to say this, the majority are in a rut: the originality, the
          brightness, creativity, the mischievousness, are all gone ...

          Albert







          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Rick Hensel <nomcaller@...> wrote:
          >
          > I agree, Paul. I think Jazz in the 20's and 30's had a more
          "positive" attitude--an "uplifting" quality to it, because conditions
          of everyday life were worse and the expression of, and reaction to,
          the music was more of a "coping mechanism". The 40's and 50's brought
          on a different attitude--a feeling that things were "better than
          before". That gave "license" to more experimentation in music; which,
          of course, is always good and bad to some degree.
          >
          > I personally feel that creating new music from the old is not
          always an advancement--as society likes to believe that everything
          evolves to a better thing (not true at all)--that it is just
          different. In Jazz music's case, definitely not better, overall. I
          see Dixieland, Hot, Swing, bebop, West Coast, Latin, Fusion, etc. as
          different kinds of music (not all true jazz); and I favor the first
          three as far more likeable than the rest, and the 1900-1936 era as the
          time when "true" Jazz was first played in our country.
          >
          > Rick H.
          >
          >
          >
          > PDQBlues@... wrote:
          > Uhm, my apologies for making what may have been an
          inappropriate analogy.
          > But heck, I never took Latin nor did well in my English course work
          either. :D
          >
          > What I was attempting (maybe feebly) was to covey the idea the Jazz,
          like
          > languages, changes over time because the people who play and listen
          to it change,
          > too. Our value systems are different from 100 years ago, our lives
          are very
          > different. And, most profoundly, our feelings of how we perceive and
          sense
          > things and reality are different.
          >
          > Based on my hearing of the music, it is my opinion that the 20s were
          a period
          > of hope and joy about the present and future whereas today we have
          pessimism
          > and a lack of hope that seems to be very prevalent -- but that may
          be my
          > perception. Yet it is that "happier" feeling that I find so
          attractive about Jazz
          > while I know many others find that same feeling in this music
          negatively.
          >
          > So, for me, Jazz is type of music that evokes certain feelings from
          me that I
          > do not find from other styles. And although I do enjoy many kinds of
          music,
          > my heart continues to stay with Jazz.
          >
          > Paul F.
          >
          > In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          writes:
          >
          > I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
          > is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
          > (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
          > anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
          > knowledge of earlier jazz forms?
          >
          > Paul F.
          >
          > In a message dated 3/20/07 9:24:20 AM, RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          writes:
          >
          > I know this is veering dangerously close to being off-topic, but Latin
          > is not a dead language. Without some understanding of Latin, you
          > (probably) have a limited understanding of your own language. Does
          > anyone fancy extending the metaphor to the benefits that come from a
          > knowledge of earlier jazz forms?
          >
          > **************************************
          > AOL now offers free email to everyone.
          > Find out more about what's free from AOL at http://www.aol.com
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > The fish are biting.
          > Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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