Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Lew Lemar

Expand Messages
  • spacelights
    ... the ... from the ... Lemar s first comment on the record hints at a kind of throwaway approach: That s terrible, Jelly. Hyena Stomp and Billy Goat
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 21, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "reid1947" <reid1947@...> wrote:
      >
      > Driving home from work the other night, I was listening to Jelly and
      the
      > Peppers when on came, the track by Jelly I dislike the most, (apart
      from the
      > Billie Young sides) "Hyena Stomp" The band part of the track is fine,
      > unfortunately one must put up with Lew Lemar and his "laugh?" for a
      > considerable time prior to that.

      Lemar's first comment on the record hints at a kind of "throwaway"
      approach: "That's terrible, Jelly." "Hyena Stomp" and "Billy Goat
      Stomp" may seem even more like missteps because they're sandwiched
      between the Morton masterpieces "Cannon Ball Blues" and "Wild Man
      Blues." Jelly had worked as a comedian early on, though according to
      Reb Spikes he didn't have much success at it... I prefer "Hyena" to
      "Billy Goat," the former also remade in a fine solo version at the
      Library of Congress, 1938.

      I'm wondering if Lemar introduces "Wild Man Blues" as well--Jelly's
      usually credited for the spoken introduction, not him in my opinion...
    • Hugh Crozier
      I have always thought that this was just an attempt to produce a novelty record for Victor. There were many at the time, such as Saxaphun and, in the UK,
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 22, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I have always thought that this was just an attempt to produce a 'novelty' record for Victor. There were many at the time, such as 'Saxaphun' and, in the UK, 'The Laughing Policeman' ( I was once in a band that played that number, hahaha).

        I am ambivalent about the laugh on Hyena Stomp. I know it has more to do with the tenor of the time than the eternal qualities of classic jazz, but I am tolerant enough to put up with it and listen to the absolutely superb musicianship behind. It is, of course, harmonically at least, the final section of King Porter Stomp rewritten and reconceptualised.

        As regards Wild Man Blues I know that Mike Meddings is keen to identify the voice. To my ears the voice on Hyena and Billy is not the same as 'Wild Man Blues'. Incidentally, sometimes I wonder if Wild Man Blues is not my favourite RHP side ... I particulary enjoy the interplay between Morton, Dodds and Stomp Evans.

        Hugh


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: reid1947 <reid1947@...>
        To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, 21 September, 2006 3:31:03 AM
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Lew Lemar

        Driving home from work the other night, I was listening to Jelly and the
        Peppers when on came, the track by Jelly I dislike the most, (apart from the
        Billie Young sides) "Hyena Stomp" The band part of the track is fine,
        unfortunately one must put up with Lew Lemar and his "laugh?" for a
        considerable time prior to that.
        Who was Lew Lemar? Obvoiusly he was supposed to be an imitator, but whatever
        posessed Jelly to use him on this track? Did he catch Jelly in a
        compromising position? Did he pay Jelly a fortune to be on the track? Did
        Jelly owe him money. There must be a reason. He definitely couldn't be there
        for any other reason.
        Was Lew Lemar White, Creole or Black? Does anyone know anything about him?

        Peter L.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • spacelights
        ... favourite RHP side ... I particulary enjoy the interplay between Morton, Dodds and Stomp Evans. After the great Dodds and Armstrong versions of Wild Man
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 23, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Hugh Crozier <jellyrollstomp@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Incidentally, sometimes I wonder if Wild Man Blues is not my
          favourite RHP side ... I particulary enjoy the interplay between
          Morton, Dodds and Stomp Evans.

          After the great Dodds and Armstrong versions of "Wild Man Blues,"
          leave it to Morton to come up with such an iconoclastic arrangement of
          his tune. Dodds' duels with Morton are among the highlights of jazz
          (I also like Baby Dodds' percussive flair). Evans' work is
          fantastic--the record seems theatrical in the best sense, artful and
          dramatic.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.