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Paramount/Louis Russell's daughter/ Gerald Wilson

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  • ikey100
    In the past week I have heard several things on various US broadcasts that I thought might interest some on this group: Co-incident with the Bix metal master
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 14, 2006
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      In the past week I have heard several things on various US
      broadcasts that I thought might interest some on this group:

      Co-incident with the Bix metal master listed on Ebay, a television
      show called "History Detectives" had a segment about a guy with two
      unidentified Paramount metal masters who was wondering what they
      might contain. The show's crew discussed the company and its'
      history, including the reports of Paramount discs being scrapped
      wholesale, and being used variously for patching wall holes, as
      toys, etc.; and then a firsthand account from an employee of the
      Port Washington, Wisc. plant who recalled discs being sailed through
      the air into the adjacent Milwaukee River for sport. The show hired
      divers to search the river bottom, but found nothing, and surmised
      that the removal of an old dam several years before had probably
      covered or washed away anything that might have been there. As for
      the two metal masters, they turned out to be a Fred Van Eps banjo
      solo and a male pop vocal (memory fails me-I think it was Charles
      Harrison). Anyway, the thing that got me most was that after alot of
      buildup, the discs' owner and the show host acted so disappointed
      that they were not titles from the jazz or blues series, when I was
      thinking that even a Van Eps Paramount master, and anything else,
      is, as Howard Rye said of the Bix, not something you see every day
      in private hands.

      Also, I heard an interview and live performance of "Back O' Town
      Blues" by Louis Russell's daughter Catherine, whose first solo CD
      has recently been released. Only six years old at the time of his
      death in 1963, she began her career singing with Carrie Smith, then
      became a very successful backup singer to many major pop stars. She
      talked about her father, grandfather, and mother (Juilliard
      trained), and the performance was nice, accompanied by a quartet and
      free of histrionics.

      A radio interview with Gerald Wilson included some nice memories of
      his time with Jimmie Lunceford's orchestra, including how Roger
      Segura prompted him to turn Wilson's arrangement of "Stompin' At The
      Savoy" into "Yard Dog Mazurka". Though his career has been in the
      post-RHJ era, nonetheless some may enjoy the interview:

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5768733


      Regards,
      Warren
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