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Robert Parker

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  • Mordechai Litzman
    While browsing the net I came across an audio engineer from Australia named Robert Parker, who was a lover of classic jazz and vintage jazz collector.
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 10, 2006
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      While browsing the net I came across an audio engineer from Australia named Robert Parker, who was a lover of classic jazz and vintage jazz collector. Apparently he developed a restoration system of old 78s to make them into digital stereo. At first I was a little skeptical, having considered JRT Davies the main authority on restoration, and having had poor experiences with digital and stereo restoration in the past.
      However, after listening to a half our program of 1923 Olivers and 1927 Hot Seven etc, I was amazed at the detail and clarity of these old recordings using this system. First impression is a little harshness and lack of warmth to the sound, a little echo, but I can hear details that I never heard before from these old 78s that I have listened to for so many years. There is somewhat of a sound stage, and the bass is better as well. It is as if somebody took a ball of tangled threads of collective improvisation and sorted them out. It was a revelation to clearly hear the duet between Johnny Dodds and Louis Armstrong on the 1923 High Society - up til now I was only aware of the cl solo.
      There is a website available for free that lists many programs by Robert Parker http://www.lagniappe.la/whoshotparker.asp.
      Would appreciate to hear from other members of the group what you think of this kind of audio restoration.


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    • Patrice Champarou
      Mordechai, Parker s name had escaped from my memory while discussing some other subject, some time ago... not even sure it was on this group, anyway, he s the
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 10, 2006
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        Mordechai,

        Parker's name had escaped from my memory while discussing some other
        subject, some time ago... not even sure it was on this group, anyway, he's
        the one Uncle Alzheimer meant. There were a few LP's (and later on CD's)
        issued from his remastered work, I still have the Armstrong and Bessie Smith
        LP's - terribly damaged, very fragile - but the first one I heard was Bix, I
        think it was the best of the collection technically speaking. Very
        impressive, and as you said Parker seemed to have isolated each instrument
        and managed to inject it into the proper channel so that you had the
        impression one half of the band was in the kitchen and the other in the
        hall. Which, after a certain amount of listening experience, is a bit
        inconvenient since I intentionally installed my speakers in the living-room.
        The process he used did ehance basses, the balance of the sound itself is
        clever, but I consider it as an occasional listening experience, I wouldn't
        like to have all my records sounding like *that*. Somewhat metallic, fairly
        artificial (a nice test is to press the "mono" button while playing, if your
        equipment allows that, you definitely miss 80% of the ehancement but
        your - well, at least my - ears start to breathe!
        After the first fit of enthusiasm which made me wonder how many records they
        could issue that way, I also discovered that the process (and probably the
        long, careful and patient work done by a single and crazy individual on each
        second of each track) had its limits, the impressive result could only be
        achieved from very "clean" masters and the last one I heard - Fats Waller -
        was very disappointing.
        To sum it up, it is my humble opinion that it cannot stand comparison with
        JRTD's work.

        Patrice

        P.S. the link doesn't work for me and I can't figure out how to alter ut so
        that it does.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Mordechai Litzman" <folke613@...>
        To: <RedHotJazz@...>
        Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 7:13 AM
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Robert Parker


        > While browsing the net I came across an audio engineer from Australia
        > named Robert Parker, who was a lover of classic jazz and vintage jazz
        > collector. Apparently he developed a restoration system of old 78s to make
        > them into digital stereo. At first I was a little skeptical, having
        > considered JRT Davies the main authority on restoration, and having had
        > poor experiences with digital and stereo restoration in the past.
        > However, after listening to a half our program of 1923 Olivers and 1927
        > Hot Seven etc, I was amazed at the detail and clarity of these old
        > recordings using this system. First impression is a little harshness and
        > lack of warmth to the sound, a little echo, but I can hear details that I
        > never heard before from these old 78s that I have listened to for so many
        > years. There is somewhat of a sound stage, and the bass is better as well.
        > It is as if somebody took a ball of tangled threads of collective
        > improvisation and sorted them out. It was a revelation to clearly hear the
        > duet between Johnny Dodds and Louis Armstrong on the 1923 High Society -
        > up til now I was only aware of the cl solo.
        > There is a website available for free that lists many programs by Robert
        > Parker http://www.lagniappe.la/whoshotparker.asp.
        > Would appreciate to hear from other members of the group what you think of
        > this kind of audio restoration.
      • Howard Rye
        ... Metallic about sums it up. This gimmick (because that is what it is) is initially very impressive. I suspect that almost anyone will find on quite few
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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          on 11/7/06 7:27, Patrice Champarou at patrice.champarou@... wrote:

          > Somewhat metallic, fairly
          > artificial (a nice test is to press the "mono" button while playing, if your
          > equipment allows that, you definitely miss 80% of the ehancement but
          > your - well, at least my - ears start to breathe!
          > After the first fit of enthusiasm which made me wonder how many records they
          > could issue that way, I also discovered that the process (and probably the
          > long, careful and patient work done by a single and crazy individual on each
          > second of each track) had its limits, the impressive result could only be
          > achieved from very "clean" masters and the last one I heard - Fats Waller -
          > was very disappointing.
          > To sum it up, it is my humble opinion that it cannot stand comparison with
          > JRTD's work.

          Metallic about sums it up. This gimmick (because that is what it is) is
          initially very impressive. I suspect that almost anyone will find on quite
          few repeated listenings that the music comes to sound more and more
          artificial. My own response to one of his New Orleans collections was that
          he had made Johnny Dodds and Sidney Arodin sound essentially the same and I
          didn't want to know even if they actually did!

          John R.T. himself was reportedly very impressed by the amount of detail
          Parker succeeded in extracting from the grooves but he soon discovered how
          to rival this without introducing the artificial tones.

          That of course is the point. There are two different processes at work here:
          the separation itself, and then the various added resonances which make the
          records sound "stereo". Who knows what could be achieved by sensitive use of
          the first without the second.


          Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          howard@...
          Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
        • Nick Dellow
          The engineer Ted Kendall told me recently that Robert Parker s initial transfers in the process he devised were of very high quality; it was the effects that
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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            The engineer Ted Kendall told me recently that Robert Parker's initial
            transfers in the process he devised were of very high quality; it was the
            "effects" that he added to them that caused the problems - that is
            "problems" to the attuned ears of serious collectors, especially those who
            collect the original 78s. For the greater public who were unfamiliar with,
            for want of a better description, "classic" jazz, Robert Parker's work at
            the very least introduced this music to a post-stereo generation who
            associated 78s with clicks, crackles and hiss and would otherwise have not
            ventured near the music. The BBC also has to be congratulated for investing
            in the project.

            As you may be aware, Robert Parker died a year or so ago. His substantial
            collection of 78s was sold, and I did actually obtain several 78s from his
            collection myself. They were all in stunningly beautiful condition. Being
            Australian, he had acquired a number of classic jazz sides on lovely
            Australian laminated pressings - all the HMVs, Deccas and Parlophones issued
            in Australia after 1931 were laminated, unlike in the UK issues on the same
            labels (earlier Parlophones were laminated, ironically!). Some of the
            records I purchased have cryptic messages lightly chalked in the run-off
            grooves, such as "best start" or "last third", indicating the best portion
            of the record to use for the transfer - later he would splice transfer tapes
            of the best portions from various copies of the same record together. That
            is dedication!

            Perhaps the last word on Robert Parker should go to John R.T. Davies who
            said, when interviewed in 2001:

            "A few years ago, Robert Parker spent a lot of time and care in putting
            together stereophonic representations of early recordings. In fact, I think
            he did us all a favour. I don't like it myself, simply on the basis that you
            can't change the venue after the event, but he did make available some
            classic pieces in a form in which those who had never experienced a 78 or
            even a monaural recording could actually, to a point, enjoy masterpieces of
            a bygone age. I think he should be handed a golden platter for this
            achievement".

            Hear, hear.


            Nick


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David W. Littlefield
            I own most of the Parker CDs, and listen almost exclusively on headphones. As I understand it, his original efforts were done for a series of BBC programs
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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              I own most of the Parker CDs, and listen almost exclusively on headphones.
              As I understand it, his original efforts were done for a series of BBC
              programs which were also carried on American public radio. BBC label issued
              some on LP. then on CD. When BBC stopped selling them, ABC (Australian
              Broadcasting Compeny) reissued them (Worlds Records had them on close-out
              sale this year, no longer lists thyem). Over the years Parker redid the
              early CDs, issued them and many more on his own label CDS. Ultimately
              Nimbus lable issued at least some of them.

              As he himself states, he started with the cleanest copies he could find, in
              fact only processed nearly mint copies. He used an oscilloscope and I don't
              know what else to repair glitches second-by-second. He used equalization
              and reverb to get the stereo effect. As I understand it, the restoration is
              on the right channel, the eq is on the left channel.

              The result is wildly variable. I found Vol. 1 of the Olivers helpful in
              hearing both cornets. But the Fletcher Henderson track I listened to
              recently was unlistenable. I have played several CDs through my mono PA
              system on gigs and found that they sound better than other reissues.

              The other stereoization system I know of was created by Richard Broady. It
              used a combination of computer hardware and software to spread the sound
              out. Several CDs using his system were issued by AVID label, and then
              somehow the system was taken over or reverse-engineered or something, and
              AVID issued several CDs including Morton, Teagarden, Spanier, Bechet and
              other sets. I was particularly impressed by the Glenn Miller "Abbey Road"
              CD (AMSC 575), which has Miller's records aimed at German audiences. Here,
              too, the result is variable, but I haven't noted any disagreeable
              elements--the stereoization just isn't as effective...

              If you want to try out the AVIDs, the stereoized CDs' catalog numbers begin
              with AMSC.

              --Sheik
            • Mordechai Litzman
              After I sent the message I tried the link and it did not work for me, either. However, just copy and paste the link from lagniappe and on onto Google, and the
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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                After I sent the message I tried the link and it did not work for me, either. However, just copy and paste the link from lagniappe and on onto Google, and the web site comes up.
                I also noticed the variance in sound quality between different recordings, but some of them come out very well.

                Patrice Champarou <patrice.champarou@...> wrote: Mordechai,

                Parker's name had escaped from my memory while discussing some other
                subject, some time ago... not even sure it was on this group, anyway, he's
                the one Uncle Alzheimer meant. There were a few LP's (and later on CD's)
                issued from his remastered work, I still have the Armstrong and Bessie Smith
                LP's - terribly damaged, very fragile - but the first one I heard was Bix, I
                think it was the best of the collection technically speaking. Very
                impressive, and as you said Parker seemed to have isolated each instrument
                and managed to inject it into the proper channel so that you had the
                impression one half of the band was in the kitchen and the other in the
                hall. Which, after a certain amount of listening experience, is a bit
                inconvenient since I intentionally installed my speakers in the living-room.
                The process he used did ehance basses, the balance of the sound itself is
                clever, but I consider it as an occasional listening experience, I wouldn't
                like to have all my records sounding like *that*. Somewhat metallic, fairly
                artificial (a nice test is to press the "mono" button while playing, if your
                equipment allows that, you definitely miss 80% of the ehancement but
                your - well, at least my - ears start to breathe!
                After the first fit of enthusiasm which made me wonder how many records they
                could issue that way, I also discovered that the process (and probably the
                long, careful and patient work done by a single and crazy individual on each
                second of each track) had its limits, the impressive result could only be
                achieved from very "clean" masters and the last one I heard - Fats Waller -
                was very disappointing.
                To sum it up, it is my humble opinion that it cannot stand comparison with
                JRTD's work.

                Patrice

                P.S. the link doesn't work for me and I can't figure out how to alter ut so
                that it does.

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Mordechai Litzman" <folke613@...>
                To: <RedHotJazz@...>
                Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 7:13 AM
                Subject: [RedHotJazz] Robert Parker

                > While browsing the net I came across an audio engineer from Australia
                > named Robert Parker, who was a lover of classic jazz and vintage jazz
                > collector. Apparently he developed a restoration system of old 78s to make
                > them into digital stereo. At first I was a little skeptical, having
                > considered JRT Davies the main authority on restoration, and having had
                > poor experiences with digital and stereo restoration in the past.
                > However, after listening to a half our program of 1923 Olivers and 1927
                > Hot Seven etc, I was amazed at the detail and clarity of these old
                > recordings using this system. First impression is a little harshness and
                > lack of warmth to the sound, a little echo, but I can hear details that I
                > never heard before from these old 78s that I have listened to for so many
                > years. There is somewhat of a sound stage, and the bass is better as well.
                > It is as if somebody took a ball of tangled threads of collective
                > improvisation and sorted them out. It was a revelation to clearly hear the
                > duet between Johnny Dodds and Louis Armstrong on the 1923 High Society -
                > up til now I was only aware of the cl solo.
                > There is a website available for free that lists many programs by Robert
                > Parker http://www.lagniappe.la/whoshotparker.asp.
                > Would appreciate to hear from other members of the group what you think of
                > this kind of audio restoration.






                ---------------------------------
                Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • soundofcd
                Robert Parker s remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s, shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I was about this new, to me,
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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                  Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                  shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I was
                  about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful sound
                  quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it in fact
                  that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague idea
                  of what the stuff must have sounded like.

                  Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker, called
                  Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one and
                  being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music and the
                  amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.

                  I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                  wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up nowadays.
                  Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                  pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                  early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or rather
                  what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old time
                  country music reissues.

                  If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really sounded
                  like.

                  Cheers,

                  Fred McCormick.
                • Mordechai Litzman
                  Dear Fred, I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this series. The Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web (see previous post
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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                    Dear Fred,

                    I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this series. The Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web (see previous post from today).
                    I checked out the heading "Regional and Rare Jazz" and came across Charles Creath's Jazz-O-Maniacs 1927 recording of Butter Finger Blues. So I decided to do some serious research and do a comparative A_B listening session comparing Rob Parker's version to my Timeless CD version by JRT Davies. I started both tunes simultaneously, switching back and forth, letting my 60 year old listening ears do their thing. In this instance I have to give thumbs up to JRT, but it was close. Perhaps Parker's restoration system works better with older acoustic recordings - as mentioned I was very impressed by King Oliver's High Society from 1923.

                    Have fun,

                    Mordechai

                    soundofcd <Fredamhran@...> wrote: Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                    shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I was
                    about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful sound
                    quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it in fact
                    that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague idea
                    of what the stuff must have sounded like.

                    Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker, called
                    Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one and
                    being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music and the
                    amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.

                    I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                    wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up nowadays.
                    Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                    pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                    early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or rather
                    what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old time
                    country music reissues.

                    If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really sounded
                    like.

                    Cheers,

                    Fred McCormick.






                    ---------------------------------
                    Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Leif R. Blom
                    Patrice wrote: PS. The link doesn´t work... But it does if you just delete the last point (after asp). I´ve been listening to Parker´s programs and I think
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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                      Patrice wrote:
                      PS. The link doesn´t work...


                      But it does if you just delete the last point (after asp).

                      I´ve been listening to Parker´s programs and I think that it is fascinating what he can do with new technique, but I never thought of buying a stereorecording of early recorded music.
                      Parker has his arguments for and in some ways it works.




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                    • Prof_Hi_Jinx
                      I asked JRT about Robert Parker (who now resides in England) shortly before John s death, and his reply was scathing. I m inclined to think that JRT was above
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 11, 2006
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                        I asked JRT about Robert Parker (who now resides in England) shortly before
                        John's death, and his reply was scathing. I'm inclined to think that JRT
                        was above being biassed about another's work, because he seemed to be
                        interesed only in the resulting sound quality.

                        I should make it clear that I am reporting JRT's views and not my own. (I'm
                        still too young to have formed my own views <g>)

                        Bob

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Mordechai Litzman" <folke613@...>
                        To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:02 AM
                        Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Robert Parker


                        > Dear Fred,
                        >
                        > I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this series. The
                        > Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web (see previous post
                        > from today).
                        > I checked out the heading "Regional and Rare Jazz" and came across Charles
                        > Creath's Jazz-O-Maniacs 1927 recording of Butter Finger Blues. So I
                        > decided to do some serious research and do a comparative A_B listening
                        > session comparing Rob Parker's version to my Timeless CD version by JRT
                        > Davies. I started both tunes simultaneously, switching back and forth,
                        > letting my 60 year old listening ears do their thing. In this instance I
                        > have to give thumbs up to JRT, but it was close. Perhaps Parker's
                        > restoration system works better with older acoustic recordings - as
                        > mentioned I was very impressed by King Oliver's High Society from 1923.
                        >
                        > Have fun,
                        >
                        > Mordechai
                        >
                        > soundofcd <Fredamhran@...> wrote:
                        > Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                        > shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I was
                        > about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful sound
                        > quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it in fact
                        > that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague idea
                        > of what the stuff must have sounded like.
                        >
                        > Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker, called
                        > Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one and
                        > being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music and the
                        > amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.
                        >
                        > I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                        > wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up nowadays.
                        > Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                        > pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                        > early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or rather
                        > what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old time
                        > country music reissues.
                        >
                        > If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really sounded
                        > like.
                        >
                        > Cheers,
                        >
                        > Fred McCormick.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ---------------------------------
                        > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Leif R. Blom
                        Prof_Hi_Jinx wrote: . .... Robert Parker (who now resides in England).... Maybe he does.. but he passed away on Dec. 30.
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 12, 2006
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                          Prof_Hi_Jinx <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote: .

                          .... Robert Parker (who now resides in England)....

                          Maybe he does.. but he passed away on Dec. 30. 2004.






                          ---------------------------------
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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Mordechai Litzman
                          Robert Parker passed away 12/30/2004 . Prof_Hi_Jinx wrote: I asked JRT about Robert Parker (who
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 12, 2006
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                            Robert Parker passed away 12/30/2004 .

                            Prof_Hi_Jinx <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote: I asked JRT about Robert Parker (who now resides in England) shortly before
                            John's death, and his reply was scathing. I'm inclined to think that JRT
                            was above being biassed about another's work, because he seemed to be
                            interesed only in the resulting sound quality.

                            I should make it clear that I am reporting JRT's views and not my own. (I'm
                            still too young to have formed my own views <g>)

                            Bob

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "Mordechai Litzman" <folke613@...>
                            To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:02 AM
                            Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Robert Parker

                            > Dear Fred,
                            >
                            > I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this series. The
                            > Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web (see previous post
                            > from today).
                            > I checked out the heading "Regional and Rare Jazz" and came across Charles
                            > Creath's Jazz-O-Maniacs 1927 recording of Butter Finger Blues. So I
                            > decided to do some serious research and do a comparative A_B listening
                            > session comparing Rob Parker's version to my Timeless CD version by JRT
                            > Davies. I started both tunes simultaneously, switching back and forth,
                            > letting my 60 year old listening ears do their thing. In this instance I
                            > have to give thumbs up to JRT, but it was close. Perhaps Parker's
                            > restoration system works better with older acoustic recordings - as
                            > mentioned I was very impressed by King Oliver's High Society from 1923.
                            >
                            > Have fun,
                            >
                            > Mordechai
                            >
                            > soundofcd <Fredamhran@...> wrote:
                            > Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                            > shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I was
                            > about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful sound
                            > quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it in fact
                            > that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague idea
                            > of what the stuff must have sounded like.
                            >
                            > Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker, called
                            > Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one and
                            > being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music and the
                            > amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.
                            >
                            > I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                            > wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up nowadays.
                            > Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                            > pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                            > early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or rather
                            > what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old time
                            > country music reissues.
                            >
                            > If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really sounded
                            > like.
                            >
                            > Cheers,
                            >
                            > Fred McCormick.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------
                            > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >






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                          • soundofcd
                            Hi Mordechai, Well, I looked up a few links and what s on offer appears to be a series of CDs which Parker prepared for the BBC. No harm in that, but I was
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 12, 2006
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                              Hi Mordechai,

                              Well, I looked up a few links and what's on offer appears to be a
                              series of CDs which Parker prepared for the BBC. No harm in that, but
                              I was referring to a series of 1/2 hour programmes, called Jazz
                              Classics in Stereo, which the BBC broadcast prior to releasing the
                              discs.

                              In fact there were two radio series. JCIS was followed by one called
                              Jazz Classics A to Z.

                              Incidentally, I found an interview with Parker while I was nosing
                              around. it's at
                              http://stefansargent.clients.neteverything.com/media/parker/interview.
                              html

                              Cheers,

                              Fred McCormick.

                              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Mordechai Litzman <folke613@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > Dear Fred,
                              >
                              > I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this
                              series. The Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web
                              (see previous post from today).
                              > I checked out the heading "Regional and Rare Jazz" and came across
                              Charles Creath's Jazz-O-Maniacs 1927 recording of Butter Finger
                              Blues. So I decided to do some serious research and do a comparative
                              A_B listening session comparing Rob Parker's version to my Timeless
                              CD version by JRT Davies. I started both tunes simultaneously,
                              switching back and forth, letting my 60 year old listening ears do
                              their thing. In this instance I have to give thumbs up to JRT, but it
                              was close. Perhaps Parker's restoration system works better with
                              older acoustic recordings - as mentioned I was very impressed by King
                              Oliver's High Society from 1923.
                              >
                              > Have fun,
                              >
                              > Mordechai
                              >
                              > soundofcd <Fredamhran@...> wrote:
                              Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                              > shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I
                              was
                              > about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful
                              sound
                              > quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it in
                              fact
                              > that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague
                              idea
                              > of what the stuff must have sounded like.
                              >
                              > Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker,
                              called
                              > Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one and
                              > being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music and
                              the
                              > amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.
                              >
                              > I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                              > wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up
                              nowadays.
                              > Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                              > pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                              > early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or
                              rather
                              > what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old
                              time
                              > country music reissues.
                              >
                              > If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really
                              sounded
                              > like.
                              >
                              > Cheers,
                              >
                              > Fred McCormick.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ---------------------------------
                              > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • heckman_michael
                              I am curious about the Glen Miller records aimed at the German market. You don t by chance refer to the show in which he banters in German with Ilsa
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 14, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I am curious about the Glen Miller records aimed at the German
                                market. You don't by chance refer to the show in which he banters in
                                German with Ilsa Weingruber?

                                --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David W. Littlefield"
                                <dwlit@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I own most of the Parker CDs, and listen almost exclusively on
                                headphones.
                                > As I understand it, his original efforts were done for a series of
                                BBC
                                > programs which were also carried on American public radio. BBC
                                label issued
                                > some on LP. then on CD. When BBC stopped selling them, ABC
                                (Australian
                                > Broadcasting Compeny) reissued them (Worlds Records had them on
                                close-out
                                > sale this year, no longer lists thyem). Over the years Parker
                                redid the
                                > early CDs, issued them and many more on his own label CDS.
                                Ultimately
                                > Nimbus lable issued at least some of them.
                                >
                                > As he himself states, he started with the cleanest copies he could
                                find, in
                                > fact only processed nearly mint copies. He used an oscilloscope
                                and I don't
                                > know what else to repair glitches second-by-second. He used
                                equalization
                                > and reverb to get the stereo effect. As I understand it, the
                                restoration is
                                > on the right channel, the eq is on the left channel.
                                >
                                > The result is wildly variable. I found Vol. 1 of the Olivers
                                helpful in
                                > hearing both cornets. But the Fletcher Henderson track I listened
                                to
                                > recently was unlistenable. I have played several CDs through my
                                mono PA
                                > system on gigs and found that they sound better than other
                                reissues.
                                >
                                > The other stereoization system I know of was created by Richard
                                Broady. It
                                > used a combination of computer hardware and software to spread the
                                sound
                                > out. Several CDs using his system were issued by AVID label, and
                                then
                                > somehow the system was taken over or reverse-engineered or
                                something, and
                                > AVID issued several CDs including Morton, Teagarden, Spanier,
                                Bechet and
                                > other sets. I was particularly impressed by the Glenn
                                Miller "Abbey Road"
                                > CD (AMSC 575), which has Miller's records aimed at German
                                audiences. Here,
                                > too, the result is variable, but I haven't noted any disagreeable
                                > elements--the stereoization just isn't as effective...
                                >
                                > If you want to try out the AVIDs, the stereoized CDs' catalog
                                numbers begin
                                > with AMSC.
                                >
                                > --Sheik
                                >
                              • David W. Littlefield
                                AVID AMSC 575: Glenn Miller: The missing chapters . Vol. 5 The complete Abbey Road recordings This 2-CD set contains the six programs, complete, with
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 16, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  AVID AMSC 575: "Glenn Miller: The missing chapters". Vol. 5 "The complete
                                  Abbey Road recordings
                                  This 2-CD set contains the six programs, complete, with translation into
                                  English in the booklet.

                                  I'm curious as to what 78 listeners think of the Broadie/AVID stereo. I
                                  don't have 78 ears, just 2, and this set sounds great to me on headphones...

                                  --Sheik

                                  At 12:55 AM 07/15/06 +0000, you wrote:
                                  >I am curious about the Glen Miller records aimed at the German
                                  >market. You don't by chance refer to the show in which he banters in
                                  >German with Ilsa Weingruber?
                                  >
                                  >--- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David W. Littlefield"
                                  ><dwlit@...> wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >> I own most of the Parker CDs, and listen almost exclusively on
                                  >headphones.
                                  >> As I understand it, his original efforts were done for a series of
                                  >BBC
                                  >> programs which were also carried on American public radio. BBC
                                  >label issued
                                  >> some on LP. then on CD. When BBC stopped selling them, ABC
                                  >(Australian
                                  >> Broadcasting Compeny) reissued them (Worlds Records had them on
                                  >close-out
                                  >> sale this year, no longer lists thyem). Over the years Parker
                                  >redid the
                                  >> early CDs, issued them and many more on his own label CDS.
                                  >Ultimately
                                  >> Nimbus lable issued at least some of them.
                                  >>
                                  >> As he himself states, he started with the cleanest copies he could
                                  >find, in
                                  >> fact only processed nearly mint copies. He used an oscilloscope
                                  >and I don't
                                  >> know what else to repair glitches second-by-second. He used
                                  >equalization
                                  >> and reverb to get the stereo effect. As I understand it, the
                                  >restoration is
                                  >> on the right channel, the eq is on the left channel.
                                  >>
                                  >> The result is wildly variable. I found Vol. 1 of the Olivers
                                  >helpful in
                                  >> hearing both cornets. But the Fletcher Henderson track I listened
                                  >to
                                  >> recently was unlistenable. I have played several CDs through my
                                  >mono PA
                                  >> system on gigs and found that they sound better than other
                                  >reissues.
                                  >>
                                  >> The other stereoization system I know of was created by Richard
                                  >Broady. It
                                  >> used a combination of computer hardware and software to spread the
                                  >sound
                                  >> out. Several CDs using his system were issued by AVID label, and
                                  >then
                                  >> somehow the system was taken over or reverse-engineered or
                                  >something, and
                                  >> AVID issued several CDs including Morton, Teagarden, Spanier,
                                  >Bechet and
                                  >> other sets. I was particularly impressed by the Glenn
                                  >Miller "Abbey Road"
                                  >> CD (AMSC 575), which has Miller's records aimed at German
                                  >audiences. Here,
                                  >> too, the result is variable, but I haven't noted any disagreeable
                                  >> elements--the stereoization just isn't as effective...
                                  >>
                                  >> If you want to try out the AVIDs, the stereoized CDs' catalog
                                  >numbers begin
                                  >> with AMSC.
                                  >>
                                  >> --Sheik
                                  >>
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • stewmclean
                                  Many thanks for the great link. Parker s work was an interesting listen,I think the trouble people have with it is that he Did add something to the original
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Aug 8, 2006
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Many thanks for the great link.
                                    Parker's work was an interesting listen,I think the trouble people
                                    have with it is that he Did add something to the original recording
                                    that was not there before.That of coarse was the revere.
                                    If he would of put out the recordings with out adding anything such
                                    as revere it might of got a different response.
                                    I also believe that he did have a very good source disk to begin
                                    with.I would still add them to my collection as they do make a nice
                                    change from time to time. Stewart Mclean
                                    --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Mordechai Litzman <folke613@...>
                                    wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Robert Parker passed away 12/30/2004 .
                                    >
                                    > Prof_Hi_Jinx <prof_hi_jinx@...>
                                    wrote: I asked JRT about Robert
                                    Parker (who now resides in England) shortly before
                                    > John's death, and his reply was scathing. I'm inclined to think
                                    that JRT
                                    > was above being biassed about another's work, because he seemed
                                    to be
                                    > interesed only in the resulting sound quality.
                                    >
                                    > I should make it clear that I am reporting JRT's views and not my
                                    own. (I'm
                                    > still too young to have formed my own views <g>)
                                    >
                                    > Bob
                                    >
                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: "Mordechai Litzman" <folke613@...>
                                    > To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                                    > Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:02 AM
                                    > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Robert Parker
                                    >
                                    > > Dear Fred,
                                    > >
                                    > > I had the same reaction as you when I first came across this
                                    series. The
                                    > > Jazz Classics in Stereo is easily available on the web (see
                                    previous post
                                    > > from today).
                                    > > I checked out the heading "Regional and Rare Jazz" and came
                                    across Charles
                                    > > Creath's Jazz-O-Maniacs 1927 recording of Butter Finger Blues.
                                    So I
                                    > > decided to do some serious research and do a comparative A_B
                                    listening
                                    > > session comparing Rob Parker's version to my Timeless CD
                                    version by JRT
                                    > > Davies. I started both tunes simultaneously, switching back and
                                    forth,
                                    > > letting my 60 year old listening ears do their thing. In this
                                    instance I
                                    > > have to give thumbs up to JRT, but it was close. Perhaps
                                    Parker's
                                    > > restoration system works better with older acoustic recordings -
                                    as
                                    > > mentioned I was very impressed by King Oliver's High Society
                                    from 1923.
                                    > >
                                    > > Have fun,
                                    > >
                                    > > Mordechai
                                    > >
                                    > > soundofcd <Fredamhran@...> wrote:
                                    > > Robert Parker's remasterings first appeared in the early 1980s,
                                    > > shortly after I got interested in early jazz. Enthusiastic as I
                                    was
                                    > > about this new, to me, music, I was disheartened by the awful
                                    sound
                                    > > quality of LP reissues of Morton, Dodds, etc. So awful was it
                                    in fact
                                    > > that it was often impossible to get anything more than a vague
                                    idea
                                    > > of what the stuff must have sounded like.
                                    > >
                                    > > Then BBC Radio 2 announced a series of programmes by Parker,
                                    called
                                    > > Jazz Classics in Stereo. I remember listening to the first one
                                    and
                                    > > being absolutely astounded by the sheer clarity of the music
                                    and the
                                    > > amount of detail which it had now become possible to hear.
                                    > >
                                    > > I haven't listened to a Parker remastering in a long while and I
                                    > > wouldn't care to comment as to how well his work stands up
                                    nowadays.
                                    > > Even so, it is important not to under-acknowledge the work of a
                                    > > pioneer. It is also important to remember that Parker's work put
                                    > > early jazz reissues streets ahead of what was being done, or
                                    rather
                                    > > what was not being done, in terms of remastering blues and old
                                    time
                                    > > country music reissues.
                                    > >
                                    > > If nothing else, Parker certainly showed me what jazz really
                                    sounded
                                    > > like.
                                    > >
                                    > > Cheers,
                                    > >
                                    > > Fred McCormick.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > ---------------------------------
                                    > > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it
                                    free.
                                    > >
                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ---------------------------------
                                    > Do you Yahoo!?
                                    > Next-gen email? Have it all with the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
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