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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Bixing

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  • Howard Rye
    ... Is not the point here that we are dealing with two different kinds of truth , both of which have their own validity? I know this idea is anathema to some,
    Message 1 of 35 , Jul 8, 2006
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      on 8/7/06 11:29, spacelights at spacelights@... wrote:

      > Really, the "verifiable facts" about people after they
      > die can seem quite mundane or statistical--what's left are primary
      > documents (sometimes inaccurate) and the many, many subjective
      > viewpoints of people who actualy had some contact with the individual
      > (I tend to prefer the "tall tales" told by those who knew Bix to
      > studied debunkings written by those who didn't).

      Is not the point here that we are dealing with two different kinds of
      "truth", both of which have their own validity?

      I know this idea is anathema to some, but the way in which Bix, or anyone
      else, was perceived by contemporaries, especially those who looked up to
      him, is part of the facts of his life, and tall tales are the proof of it.

      What we really have to watch out for and suppress are posthumous myths,
      romancing by early enthusiasts, often Europeans who had no idea whatever
      what was really going on outside recording studios. These myths can only
      ultimately demean the memory of those about whom they are told.

      The question of tall tales told by contemporaries whose real purpose is to
      aggrandize the speaker at the expense of the person about whom the tale is
      told is perhaps a third case. Also a kind of truth but a different kind. A
      story about Bix in Benny Goodman's The Kingdom of Swing always comes to mind
      in this context and with it Benny Green's meticulous (if pointless) line by
      line destruction of it in The Reluctant Art. Now that kind of debunking I
      can only applaud!

      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
    • Bob Eagle
      Yes, you re right. I was (clumsily) trying to provide an explanation why he was not described as Musician anywhere (aside from the AFM). Bob Howard Rye
      Message 35 of 35 , Jul 12, 2006
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        Yes, you're right. I was (clumsily) trying to provide an explanation why he was not described as "Musician" anywhere (aside from the AFM).

        Bob

        Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
        on 12/7/06 11:16, Prof_Hi_Jinx at prof_hi_jinx@... wrote:

        > George Tall (born Leavenworth, KS 25 September 1897) appears in various
        > Draft and Census listings, initially in Leavenworth (as late as 1918,
        > indexed as "Dfall" (?)), later in Kansas City, KS.
        >
        > There is no Sam* Tall nearby.
        >
        > On that basis, it seems sensible to forget Sam and go with George. George's
        > occupation is Porter or Janitor, but if he merely "strummed" a banjo, maybe
        > he was not too accomplished or active.

        Granted, but he was a member of the AFM and he did join Local 627 at the
        same time as other members of Moten's band.

        The records would seem to be a good basis for judgement of his skills!

        Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
        howard@...
        Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098





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