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Millard G. Thomas / Charles Harris

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  • spacelights
    Hello my friends, I m back from New York, where I stayed for two months (with no internet)... I just caught up on reading the April/May posts--fascinating and
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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      Hello my friends,

      I'm back from New York, where I stayed for two months (with no
      internet)... I just caught up on reading the April/May
      posts--fascinating and important threads on Armstrong and Bix, Oliver
      and Whiteman, New Orleans and the nature of Blues, and more.

      Jazz Oracle is requesting help for a projected reissue of Millard G.
      Thomas records on Ajax (1924). I've not heard these--does anyone know
      if the version of "Lazy Drag" is the Thomas Morris composition? Also,
      I'm interested in the participation of alto player Charles Harris,
      listed as the same man on Paramount sides with Jelly Roll Morton in
      1923 and (probably) with Ma Rainey in spring, 1924 (the Millard Thomas
      dates occurred in Montreal, starting June 6, 1924).

      Regards to all,

      John (in California)
    • Mordechai Litzman
      Hi John, You will find Lazy Drag with Millard G. Thomas and his Chicago Orchestra on the RHJA, as well as the same tune with Thomas Morris. I listened to both,
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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        Hi John,

        You will find Lazy Drag with Millard G. Thomas and his Chicago Orchestra on the RHJA, as well as the same tune with Thomas Morris. I listened to both, but can only say that the tunes sound similar - not sure if it is the same tune.
        A search of Charles Harris on the RHJA shows a number of recordings with Lovie Austin's Blues Serenaders accompanying three different singers, as well as recordings with W.C. Handy from 1917.
        Hope that this is helpful.

        Mordechai

        spacelights <spacelights@...> wrote: Hello my friends,

        I'm back from New York, where I stayed for two months (with no
        internet)... I just caught up on reading the April/May
        posts--fascinating and important threads on Armstrong and Bix, Oliver
        and Whiteman, New Orleans and the nature of Blues, and more.

        Jazz Oracle is requesting help for a projected reissue of Millard G.
        Thomas records on Ajax (1924). I've not heard these--does anyone know
        if the version of "Lazy Drag" is the Thomas Morris composition? Also,
        I'm interested in the participation of alto player Charles Harris,
        listed as the same man on Paramount sides with Jelly Roll Morton in
        1923 and (probably) with Ma Rainey in spring, 1924 (the Millard Thomas
        dates occurred in Montreal, starting June 6, 1924).

        Regards to all,

        John (in California)





        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Prof_Hi_Jinx
        Here s some detail on Millard: MILLARD G. THOMAS (piano; music teacher; composer) was born at Collinsville, astride Madison and St. Clair counties,
        Message 3 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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          Here's some detail on Millard:

          MILLARD G. THOMAS (piano; music teacher; composer) was born at
          Collinsville, astride Madison and St. Clair counties, Illinois, on 7
          September 1894.

          He was registered for the Military Draft on 7 June 1917, when he and his
          wife were residing at 2329 (South) Dearborn Street, Chicago, from which he
          worked as a music teacher "in business for self". The residence address is
          crossed out and replaced by 14 King Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He
          was shown as of medium build and height. He had only a wife to support.

          The family had apparently moved to Canada by 1920.

          He recorded with his own jazz band during the 1920s. In 1924 he recorded
          the piano solos BLUE IVORIES and RECKLESS BLUES, released by (Austrian,
          later Scottish) Document CD #DOCD-5314.

          By 1930, he was residing at 102 119th Street, Manhattan, New York, and his
          occupation was "Composer, Music, Public". He was aged 35, having first
          married at 22, and had been born in Illinois. His wife was Hazel B. Thomas,
          aged 29, having first married at 16, "Hair Dresser, Beauty Parlor". She had
          been born in Louisiana.

          Their children were Millard J. (12, born in Illinois); Elma (11, born in
          Illinois); Gyrondlin (possibly Gwendolin - indexed as Gyeondin: aged 9
          years 3 months); Hazel M. (aged 8 years 3 months); and Vivian (daughter,
          aged 7 years 8 months). The last three children are shown as born in
          Canada, but to be American citizens - "Am. Cit."

          Millard's son, also Millard, was born on 7 October 1917, according to his
          social security details. His social security card was numbered 228-10-9454,
          and was issued in Virginia before 1951. He died in January 1975, and his
          last residence was at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60640. There seems to
          be no social security death index record for Millard G. Thomas or for his
          wife Hazel B. Thomas.



          Bob



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "spacelights" <spacelights@...>
          To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, June 12, 2006 9:05 AM
          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Millard G. Thomas / Charles Harris


          > Hello my friends,
          >
          > I'm back from New York, where I stayed for two months (with no
          > internet)... I just caught up on reading the April/May
          > posts--fascinating and important threads on Armstrong and Bix, Oliver
          > and Whiteman, New Orleans and the nature of Blues, and more.
          >
          > Jazz Oracle is requesting help for a projected reissue of Millard G.
          > Thomas records on Ajax (1924). I've not heard these--does anyone know
          > if the version of "Lazy Drag" is the Thomas Morris composition? Also,
          > I'm interested in the participation of alto player Charles Harris,
          > listed as the same man on Paramount sides with Jelly Roll Morton in
          > 1923 and (probably) with Ma Rainey in spring, 1924 (the Millard Thomas
          > dates occurred in Montreal, starting June 6, 1924).
          >
          > Regards to all,
          >
          > John (in California)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • David Brown
          Hello John Nice to have you back. I wondered where you were. Yes, it s the same Lazy Drag which brings into question the compositional credit of Morris. In
          Message 4 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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            Hello John

            Nice to have you back. I wondered where you were. Yes, it's the same 'Lazy
            Drag' which brings into question the compositional credit of Morris.

            In the Millard the' tune' sounds very much like a strain from a rag and the
            structure, to me, generally much like a ragtime piece.

            Thomas uses the same first two 'strains' then transports into a blues.

            The side also brings us back to the second cornet on the Morris which I have
            listed in different sources as both Stewart and Pinkett. I find it very hard
            to hear Rex here. Anybody know a contemporary Rex with which to compare ?

            Dave



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • spacelights
            Thanks, Mordechai--difficulties with Real Audio sometimes prevent my listening to the site. I like the tone of Harris s solos on the 1923 Morton sides, also
            Message 5 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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              Thanks, Mordechai--difficulties with Real Audio sometimes prevent my
              listening to the site. I like the tone of Harris's solos on the 1923
              Morton sides, also what he added (with Lovie Austin) to Ma Rainey's
              sound in 1924. The fact that he recorded with Handy makes his career
              even more interesting...

              John

              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Mordechai Litzman <folke613@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi John,
              >
              > You will find Lazy Drag with Millard G. Thomas and his Chicago
              Orchestra on the RHJA, as well as the same tune with Thomas Morris. I
              listened to both, but can only say that the tunes sound similar - not
              sure if it is the same tune.
              > A search of Charles Harris on the RHJA shows a number of recordings
              with Lovie Austin's Blues Serenaders accompanying three different
              singers, as well as recordings with W.C. Handy from 1917.
              > Hope that this is helpful.
              >
              > Mordechai
            • spacelights
              Thank you, Bob--Jazz Oracle might appreciate this information as well! John ... his ... which he ... address is ... Canada. He ... recorded ... (Austrian, ...
              Message 6 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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                Thank you, Bob--Jazz Oracle might appreciate this information as well!

                John

                --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Prof_Hi_Jinx" <prof_hi_jinx@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Here's some detail on Millard:
                >
                > MILLARD G. THOMAS (piano; music teacher; composer) was born at
                > Collinsville, astride Madison and St. Clair counties, Illinois, on 7
                > September 1894.
                >
                > He was registered for the Military Draft on 7 June 1917, when he and
                his
                > wife were residing at 2329 (South) Dearborn Street, Chicago, from
                which he
                > worked as a music teacher "in business for self". The residence
                address is
                > crossed out and replaced by 14 King Street, Toronto, Ontario,
                Canada. He
                > was shown as of medium build and height. He had only a wife to support.
                >
                > The family had apparently moved to Canada by 1920.
                >
                > He recorded with his own jazz band during the 1920s. In 1924 he
                recorded
                > the piano solos BLUE IVORIES and RECKLESS BLUES, released by
                (Austrian,
                > later Scottish) Document CD #DOCD-5314.
                >
                > By 1930, he was residing at 102 119th Street, Manhattan, New York,
                and his
                > occupation was "Composer, Music, Public". He was aged 35, having first
                > married at 22, and had been born in Illinois. His wife was Hazel B.
                Thomas,
                > aged 29, having first married at 16, "Hair Dresser, Beauty Parlor".
                She had
                > been born in Louisiana.
                >
                > Their children were Millard J. (12, born in Illinois); Elma (11,
                born in
                > Illinois); Gyrondlin (possibly Gwendolin - indexed as Gyeondin: aged 9
                > years 3 months); Hazel M. (aged 8 years 3 months); and Vivian
                (daughter,
                > aged 7 years 8 months). The last three children are shown as born in
                > Canada, but to be American citizens - "Am. Cit."
                >
                > Millard's son, also Millard, was born on 7 October 1917, according
                to his
                > social security details. His social security card was numbered
                228-10-9454,
                > and was issued in Virginia before 1951. He died in January 1975,
                and his
                > last residence was at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60640. There
                seems to
                > be no social security death index record for Millard G. Thomas or
                for his
                > wife Hazel B. Thomas.
                >
                >
                >
                > Bob
              • spacelights
                Thanks Dave... Two contemporary Stewart sides to compare are The Stampede / Jackass Blues with Fletcher Henderson (5-14-26)--Rex solos on both of these.
                Message 7 of 18 , Jun 11, 2006
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                  Thanks Dave... Two contemporary Stewart sides to compare are "The
                  Stampede"/"Jackass Blues" with Fletcher Henderson (5-14-26)--Rex solos
                  on both of these. I'm pretty well convinced he's on the Morris
                  session--the cornet solo (at around 1:48) on "Lazy Drag" sounds quite
                  similar to the Hendersons. "Jackass Blues" appears on both
                  dates--Stewart plays lead on the Morris version but doesn't solo.
                  Reportedly, Stewart identified himself on hearing "Charleston
                  Stampede" from the same date (7-13-26).

                  Regards to all,

                  John

                  --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello John
                  >
                  > Nice to have you back. I wondered where you were. Yes, it's the
                  same 'Lazy
                  > Drag' which brings into question the compositional credit of Morris.
                  >
                  > In the Millard the' tune' sounds very much like a strain from a rag
                  and the
                  > structure, to me, generally much like a ragtime piece.
                  >
                  > Thomas uses the same first two 'strains' then transports into a blues.
                  >
                  > The side also brings us back to the second cornet on the Morris
                  which I have
                  > listed in different sources as both Stewart and Pinkett. I find it
                  very hard
                  > to hear Rex here. Anybody know a contemporary Rex with which to
                  compare ?
                  >
                  > Dave
                • Howard Rye
                  ... There is an account of the band and its pre-history in the Caddo Orchestra of Shreveport, LA, in Mark Miller s Some Hustling This (pp.81-2). Charles Harris
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jun 12, 2006
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                    on 12/6/06 6:15, Prof_Hi_Jinx at prof_hi_jinx@... wrote:

                    >
                    > MILLARD G. THOMAS (piano; music teacher; composer) was born at
                    > Collinsville, astride Madison and St. Clair counties, Illinois, on 7
                    > September 1894.
                    >
                    > He was registered for the Military Draft on 7 June 1917, when he and his
                    > wife were residing at 2329 (South) Dearborn Street, Chicago, from which he
                    > worked as a music teacher "in business for self". The residence address is
                    > crossed out and replaced by 14 King Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He
                    > was shown as of medium build and height. He had only a wife to support.
                    >
                    > The family had apparently moved to Canada by 1920.

                    There is an account of the band and its pre-history in the Caddo Orchestra
                    of Shreveport, LA, in Mark Miller's Some Hustling This (pp.81-2). Charles
                    Harris was in the Caddo Orchestra as early as 1914 for which Mark cites a
                    reference in the Freeman. Thomas joined before the band opened at the DeLuxe
                    Cafe, Chicago in June 1917.

                    Mark believes Harris and Thomas moved to Montréal "possibly as early as
                    December 1918". Looks like they moved to Canada even earlier, possibly when
                    they closed the DeLuxe in August.

                    It's good news that Jazz Oracle have embarked on a reissue though on the
                    basis of the few band sides I've heard Mark is right the band is not that
                    brilliant! Great feeling though and an important piece of history.



                    Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                    howard@...
                    Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
                  • David Brown
                    John --and anyone else interested -- I have listened intensively to the 3 Morris sides ( + 1 alt ) of 13 July 1926. Considering also the work of Rex on the 14
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jun 13, 2006
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                      John --and anyone else interested -- I have listened intensively to the 3
                      Morris sides ( + 1 alt ) of 13 July 1926. Considering also the work of Rex
                      on the 14 May 1926 Dixie Stompers and especially ' Jackass Blues', and his
                      claim, I now think he is the second cornettist, who is certainly a Louis
                      influenced stylist. My breakdown of the cornet work is as follows.

                      LAZY DRAG
                      Tom straight lead into Rex wa-wa solo with Tom picking up the lead
                      immediately afterwards. Rex --very Louis ---unmistakably picks up the lead
                      at about 1:41 and carries it till a superb open Tom solo from about 1:48.
                      Rex leads out from about 2:30.

                      JACKASS BLUES ( A take although the alt. seems similar)
                      Rex lead into Tom wa-wa solo with a Rex 'whinny' at about 0:15. Rex picks up
                      the lead from about 0:30.The final lead is Tom.

                      CHARLESTON STAMPEDE
                      Rex lead till about 0:44 when you hear him drop out to pick up the mute for
                      the first wa-wa solo. Rex, again very Louis, has the lead from 1:41 till
                      Tom's wa-wa solo at about 2:08. Rex has the lead out from about 2:40.

                      This is my best opinion but I am open to other suggestions as it is quite
                      tight with Rex, I think, deliberately underplaying in places. The clue is in
                      the phrasing, Rex even in mute, post Louis. Also more vehement wa-wa. Also
                      Tom is a much more delicate and plaintive wa-wa player, more manipulative,
                      more vocal.

                      The second cornet on the subsequent 16 August 1926 session is much easier to
                      pick and on a more cursory listen sounds to me, notwithstanding my
                      admiration for JRT and 'Big Charlie Thomas' to be Jabbo, albeit in less
                      abrasive, pushy and keening mode than his later Louis covers.

                      Listening around Mitchell I find a supposed presence on a Nashville Jazzers
                      'St.Louis Blues' c 1927 for Van Dyke. No way do I hear him on this.
                      Anybody --Howard--details on this ?

                      Dave




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • spacelights
                      Hi Dave--great breakdown of the Morris sides... I do agree with your identifications. Previously, Lazy Drag had me reversing the IDs at 1:41 and 1:48, as
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jun 13, 2006
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                        Hi Dave--great breakdown of the Morris sides... I do agree with your
                        identifications. Previously, "Lazy Drag" had me reversing the IDs at
                        1:41 and 1:48, as Stewart is quite voracious with the wah-wah lead,
                        and Morris's (I agree, wonderful) solo at first seemed
                        uncharacteristic of him. He actually reverts to the style he'd used
                        with the Past Jazz Masters three years earlier--interesting, as this
                        was his first side as leader since then.

                        With regard to the Nashville Jazzers, I've gone back and forth in my
                        opinions. Listening again, I can't rule Morris out entirely. Some
                        people think it's Mike Mosiello, but I don't hear anything definitive
                        for or against... Since Rust states Morris firmly, I'm wondering
                        about the origin of this identification (then again, Rust's entries
                        for the Victor sides we've discussed seem quite inaccurate). 'Grey
                        Gull Rarities' (Jazz Oracle)--an excellent collection--includes fine
                        transfers of both takes, but also does not question Morris's presence.
                        Destined perhaps to be one of the perennial mysteries...

                        (I'm unclear as to the "Mitchell" reference at the end of your post
                        and in the subject line... Have you been listening to George
                        Mitchell?--another favorite!).

                        Regards,

                        John

                        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > John --and anyone else interested -- I have listened intensively to
                        the 3
                        > Morris sides ( + 1 alt ) of 13 July 1926. Considering also the work
                        of Rex
                        > on the 14 May 1926 Dixie Stompers and especially ' Jackass Blues',
                        and his
                        > claim, I now think he is the second cornettist, who is certainly a Louis
                        > influenced stylist. My breakdown of the cornet work is as follows.
                        >
                        > LAZY DRAG
                        > Tom straight lead into Rex wa-wa solo with Tom picking up the lead
                        > immediately afterwards. Rex --very Louis ---unmistakably picks up
                        the lead
                        > at about 1:41 and carries it till a superb open Tom solo from about
                        1:48.
                        > Rex leads out from about 2:30.
                        >
                        > JACKASS BLUES ( A take although the alt. seems similar)
                        > Rex lead into Tom wa-wa solo with a Rex 'whinny' at about 0:15. Rex
                        picks up
                        > the lead from about 0:30.The final lead is Tom.
                        >
                        > CHARLESTON STAMPEDE
                        > Rex lead till about 0:44 when you hear him drop out to pick up the
                        mute for
                        > the first wa-wa solo. Rex, again very Louis, has the lead from 1:41 till
                        > Tom's wa-wa solo at about 2:08. Rex has the lead out from about 2:40.
                        >
                        > This is my best opinion but I am open to other suggestions as it is
                        quite
                        > tight with Rex, I think, deliberately underplaying in places. The
                        clue is in
                        > the phrasing, Rex even in mute, post Louis. Also more vehement
                        wa-wa. Also
                        > Tom is a much more delicate and plaintive wa-wa player, more
                        manipulative,
                        > more vocal.
                        >
                        > The second cornet on the subsequent 16 August 1926 session is much
                        easier to
                        > pick and on a more cursory listen sounds to me, notwithstanding my
                        > admiration for JRT and 'Big Charlie Thomas' to be Jabbo, albeit in less
                        > abrasive, pushy and keening mode than his later Louis covers.
                        >
                        > Listening around Mitchell I find a supposed presence on a Nashville
                        Jazzers
                        > 'St.Louis Blues' c 1927 for Van Dyke. No way do I hear him on this.
                        > Anybody --Howard--details on this ?
                        >
                        > Dave
                      • David Brown
                        John. Glad we agree. Yes, the cornet at 1:41 on Lazy Drag is so Louis is has to be Rex. The cornet on the Nashvilles is stiff and faltering and just not
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jun 13, 2006
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                          John. Glad we agree. Yes, the cornet at 1:41 on 'Lazy Drag' is so Louis is
                          has to be Rex.

                          The cornet on the Nashvilles is stiff and faltering and just not good enough
                          for Tom, especially by 1927. Also it seems to display stylistic
                          characteristics inconsistent with Tom.

                          Where is some Mosiello, of whom I have never heard ?

                          Yes, a healthy scepticism is always necessary when approaching the
                          discographies, all of which are in some way plagiaristic, feeding on
                          previous works, repeating errors, even as we have seen this week with the
                          Coleman Paris session, back to the 'First' discography, 'Jazz Directory'
                          emanating from around 1949. We are still left with the source for Rust's
                          Pinkett on these sides.

                          You did not comment on the Jabbo/Big Charlie issue. Can anybody reveal the
                          latest wisdom in respect to the latter JRT 'manifestation ' ?

                          Ah well, the Mitchell slip is really non-musical, a confusion of my
                          obsessions, my other being Film ( Movie to you) History. Thomas Mitchell,
                          fine actor, most famous role in 'Gone With The Wind'. But sure, I rate '
                          Little Mitch' very highly too.

                          All the best

                          Dave




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • spacelights
                          ... He was trumpeter for the Grey Gull House Band, and appears on six or seven (possibly more) tracks on the Grey Gull Rarities CD. ... reveal the ... Jabbo
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Where is some Mosiello, of whom I have never heard ?

                            He was trumpeter for the Grey Gull House Band, and appears on six or
                            seven (possibly more) tracks on the 'Grey Gull Rarities' CD.

                            >
                            > You did not comment on the Jabbo/Big Charlie issue. Can anybody
                            reveal the
                            > latest wisdom in respect to the latter JRT 'manifestation' ?

                            Jabbo volunteered to Richard Rains that his first session was "with
                            Tommy Morris"--this is it (8-17-26), almost certainly. Intriguingly,
                            in 1927 he would substitute for Miley, and in 1928 record with Waller
                            (both strong Morris cohorts).

                            Not sure about the latest 'Charlie Thomas' wisdom--sometimes I think
                            he's an amalgam of Charlie Gaines and Thomas Morris, created through
                            nebulous recollections some 40 years later (I've not heard the 'Big
                            Charlie Thomas' disc on Timeless, though I'm familiar with some of
                            those records).

                            Musicians' recollections often prove valuable, but I'm reminded of an
                            experience in a group I once played in with two singers. As we
                            listened to a song we'd recorded, one of the singers' comments
                            indicated she thought she had sung it, when in fact the other singer
                            had. I think we'd recorded it two months earlier!

                            >
                            > Ah well, the Mitchell slip is really non-musical, a confusion of my
                            > obsessions, my other being Film ( Movie to you) History. Thomas
                            Mitchell,
                            > fine actor, most famous role in 'Gone With The Wind'.

                            Also the Doctor in 'Stage Coach' ("Get me coffee. Black coffee...")
                            and Uncle Billy in 'It's A Wonderful Life' (not off-topic perhaps,
                            there's some jazz piano during a bar scene)...

                            John
                          • Howard Rye
                            ... Mike Mosiello presents intractable problems for the researcher. Most identifications are based on an interview with Andy Sanella conducted on Brian Rust s
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                              on 14/6/06 7:20, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                              > Where is some Mosiello, of whom I have never heard ?

                              Mike Mosiello presents intractable problems for the researcher. Most
                              identifications are based on an interview with Andy Sanella conducted on
                              Brian Rust's behalf in 1962. The expectation that anyone would remember
                              details of pick-up dates of the kind that the Grey Gull house band did after
                              30 years is truly bizarre. Unfortunately Brian was pre-disposed to believe
                              him because of his ongoing embarrassment over the issue of Memphis Jazzers
                              sides under King Oliver's name in the 40s, for which he was apparently
                              responsible (though no one would know if he didn't insist on apologizing for
                              it!).

                              I feel particularly sour about this because I fell head first into the much
                              worse trap consequently set and attributed the playing on 'In Harlem's
                              Araby' to him in my Grove entry on Mosiello. I was hearing what I expected
                              to hear and should have known better. Attributing the playing to Oliver was
                              much less silly than attributing it to Mosiello.

                              Mosiello was born in Italy in July 1896 and died in Neptune, NJ on 6 June
                              1953. He is undoubtedly to be heard on a good many Grey Gull recordings.
                              Laurens Hertzdahl in his notes to the Grey Gull CD reckons that he is very
                              easily identifiable. He was later known as Michael Mells and apparently
                              worked for Mal Hallett. He is a hot-dance player.

                              You're right, David, that I cannot resist commenting on the Nashville
                              Jazzers. I am pretty convinced the clarinet is Bob Fuller, near the top of
                              his considerable form, on take -B especially. The trumpeter seems to display
                              Morris's characteristic quacking tone at times, but you will gather from
                              this that my neck is definitely not extended on this one!

                              Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                              howard@...
                              Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
                            • Albert Haim
                              Several Years ago, I published a long article about Mike Mosiello in the Misissippi Rag. The article is available as a microsoft word document in
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                                Several Years ago, I published a long article about Mike Mosiello in
                                the Misissippi Rag.

                                The article is available as a microsoft word document in

                                http://bixbeiderbecke.com/Mosiello Story.doc

                                Warning the document is 20 pages long and contains 27,791 characters.

                                I played several recordings that feature Mike Mosiello on trumpet in
                                one of my WBIX radio programs. Go to
                                http://bixography.com/wbix101to150.html
                                and scroll down to Program # 101. Click on the link "Streaming audio
                                file." You need Real Player.

                                Albert
                              • David Brown
                                Howard. Interesting. I fear I have no Mosiello with which to compare but he cannot poss. be the man on the Nashvilles, who is definitely black and no way a
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                                  Howard.

                                  Interesting. I fear I have no Mosiello with which to compare but he cannot
                                  poss. be the man on the Nashvilles, who is definitely black and no way a
                                  professional dance band musician but a rather fallible and faltering 'naif.'
                                  Morris was no great technician -- although 'quacking' is unkind -- but less
                                  approximate than this normally. What other candidates ?

                                  Dave



                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Howard Rye
                                  ... I didn t mean quacking to be unkind I assure you. To the contrary, distinctive tonal characteristics such as Morris displays are what real jazz is all
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                                    on 14/6/06 13:58, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                                    > Interesting. I fear I have no Mosiello with which to compare but he cannot
                                    > poss. be the man on the Nashvilles, who is definitely black and no way a
                                    > professional dance band musician but a rather fallible and faltering 'naif.'
                                    > Morris was no great technician -- although 'quacking' is unkind -- but less
                                    > approximate than this normally. What other candidates ?

                                    I didn't mean "quacking" to be unkind I assure you. To the contrary,
                                    distinctive tonal characteristics such as Morris displays are what real jazz
                                    is all about.

                                    Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                                    howard@...
                                    Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
                                  • Albert Haim
                                    Because of the space between Mosiello and Story in the url, the link does not extend beyond Mosiello. To circumvent this, copy and paste
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                                      Because of the space between Mosiello and Story in the url, the link
                                      does not extend beyond Mosiello. To circumvent this, copy and paste
                                      bixbeiderbecke.com/Mosiello Story.doc
                                      in the address box.

                                      Albert

                                      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Albert Haim" <alberthaim@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Several Years ago, I published a long article about Mike Mosiello in
                                      > the Misissippi Rag.
                                      >
                                      > The article is available as a microsoft word document in
                                      >
                                      > http://bixbeiderbecke.com/Mosiello Story.doc
                                      >
                                      > Warning the document is 20 pages long and contains 27,791 characters.
                                      >
                                      > I played several recordings that feature Mike Mosiello on trumpet in
                                      > one of my WBIX radio programs. Go to
                                      > http://bixography.com/wbix101to150.html
                                      > and scroll down to Program # 101. Click on the link "Streaming audio
                                      > file." You need Real Player.
                                      >
                                      > Albert
                                      >
                                    • David Brown
                                      Albert. Many thanks for the Mosiello material, written & aural, which I now have safely loaded and which is so substantial that it will take time to
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Jun 14, 2006
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                                        Albert.

                                        Many thanks for the Mosiello material, written & aural, which I now have
                                        safely loaded and which is so substantial that it will take time to
                                        assimilate.

                                        Dave



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