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NEW SONGS - J.C. Johnson and his Five Hot Sparks

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  • Scott Alexander
    I ve added a couple of excellent songs to the site: http://www.redhotjazz.com/jcj5hs.html
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 27, 2004
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      I've added a couple of excellent songs to the site:
      http://www.redhotjazz.com/jcj5hs.html
    • Chris Smith
      ... Rust gives Walter Bennett, c[ornet]; J.C. Higginbotham, tb; unknown; cl; unknown, as; Mabel Horsey, p; unknown, bj. Chris Smith
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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        On 28/9/04 5:46 pm, "Andrew Homzy" <homzy@...> wrote:

        > Dear Scott,
        >
        > Thank you so much for adding those "Sparks: to the website.
        >
        > "Red Hot Hottentot" literally burnt me up. Whatever the merits of J.C.
        > [passion not withstanding], his side-men are very good. Such control of both
        > instruments and material = equals = musicality.
        >
        > Who are these guys? NYC - Long Island, 1929.
        >
        > The clarinetist has the funky-ness of Dodds yet the control of Bigard. Omer
        > Simeon?
        >
        > The trumpeter has the brilliance of Jabbo. Could it be Cootie or (gasp)
        > Freddie Jenkins?
        >
        > The trombonist really cuts the mustard. The aggressiveness of Higginbotham
        > without the trademark snake-shake. Big Charlie Green?
        >
        > The saxophonist is advanced beyond what Hawkins was doing at the time. He
        > plays one chord wrong in his solo and seems to have the technique of a
        > clarinetist. Almost like Bechet on alto - imagine that.
        >
        > The banjoist plays whole-tone scales in his first break and demonstrates a
        > blusey-ness that is rarely heard on the instrument. Bela Fleck?
        >
        > The composition/arrangement is also quite sophisticated - some unusual
        > harmonic twists here and there and very interesting orchestration in
        > general. I can't imagine that they played this piece much - probably
        > sight-reading it in the studio.
        >
        > In some ways, the piece is like Arthur Schutt meets Jelly Roll Morton.
        >
        > "Crying For You (Baby Mine)" is not as impressive - but it does have some
        > very good moments. The theme has an unusually wide ranging melody and there
        > are some interesting harmonies - but not radical as in RHH.
        >
        > Any comments on personnel?
        >
        Rust gives Walter Bennett, c[ornet]; J.C. Higginbotham, tb; unknown; cl;
        unknown, as; Mabel Horsey, p; unknown, bj.

        Chris Smith
        (chris@...)
        The Schoolhouse
        OUT SKERRIES
        Shetland ZE2 9AS
        Scotland UK
        Phone +44 1806 515206
        Fax +44 1806 515261
      • Chris Smith
        ... Having read the small print, I see that Rust lists all these as possibilities only. (Well, I guess he means the unknowns really are unknowns, but you know
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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          I wrote:

          > Rust gives Walter Bennett, c[ornet]; J.C. Higginbotham, tb; unknown; cl;
          > unknown, as; Mabel Horsey, p; unknown, bj.

          Having read the small print, I see that Rust lists all these as
          possibilities only. (Well, I guess he means the unknowns really are
          unknowns, but you know what I mean.)

          Chris Smith
          (chris@...)
          The Schoolhouse
          OUT SKERRIES
          Shetland ZE2 9AS
          Scotland UK
          Phone +44 1806 515206
          Fax +44 1806 515261
        • Scott Alexander
          The latest Rust guesses that the following personnel played on the record: Walter Bennett - Cornet Mabel Horsey - Piano (but then says that J.C. Johnson s
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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            The latest Rust guesses that the following personnel played on the record:
            Walter Bennett - Cornet
            Mabel Horsey - Piano (but then says that J.C. Johnson's other records are of
            no jazz interest?)
            Charlie Vincento - Banjo
            Everyone else is unknown.

            The Biograph LP that the songs came from has the following guesses but is
            not sure of any of it:
            Jabbo Smith - Cornet
            Roy Palmer - Trombone
            George James - Clarinet or Alto Sax or both
            Omer Simeon - Clarinet
            Mabel Horsey or J.C. Johnson - Piano (they acknowledge Rust's guess of Mabel
            being the pianist but wonder why J.C. Johnson is not listed when his name is
            on the label)
            Ikey Robinson - Banjo


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Andrew Homzy" <homzy@...>
            To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: "yves francois" <aprestitine@...>
            Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 9:46 AM
            Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] NEW SONGS - J.C. Johnson and his Five Hot Sparks


            Dear Scott,

            Thank you so much for adding those "Sparks: to the website.

            "Red Hot Hottentot" literally burnt me up. Whatever the merits of J.C.
            [passion not withstanding], his side-men are very good. Such control of both
            instruments and material = equals = musicality.

            Who are these guys? NYC - Long Island, 1929.

            The clarinetist has the funky-ness of Dodds yet the control of Bigard. Omer
            Simeon?

            The trumpeter has the brilliance of Jabbo. Could it be Cootie or (gasp)
            Freddie Jenkins?

            The trombonist really cuts the mustard. The aggressiveness of Higginbotham
            without the trademark snake-shake. Big Charlie Green?

            The saxophonist is advanced beyond what Hawkins was doing at the time. He
            plays one chord wrong in his solo and seems to have the technique of a
            clarinetist. Almost like Bechet on alto - imagine that.

            The banjoist plays whole-tone scales in his first break and demonstrates a
            blusey-ness that is rarely heard on the instrument. Bela Fleck?

            The composition/arrangement is also quite sophisticated - some unusual
            harmonic twists here and there and very interesting orchestration in
            general. I can't imagine that they played this piece much - probably
            sight-reading it in the studio.

            In some ways, the piece is like Arthur Schutt meets Jelly Roll Morton.

            "Crying For You (Baby Mine)" is not as impressive - but it does have some
            very good moments. The theme has an unusually wide ranging melody and there
            are some interesting harmonies - but not radical as in RHH.

            Any comments on personnel?

            Cheers,

            Andrew Homzy, Montréal





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          • Andrew Homzy
            Dear Scott, Thank you so much for adding those Sparks: to the website. Red Hot Hottentot literally burnt me up. Whatever the merits of J.C. [passion not
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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              Dear Scott,

              Thank you so much for adding those "Sparks: to the website.

              "Red Hot Hottentot" literally burnt me up. Whatever the merits of J.C.
              [passion not withstanding], his side-men are very good. Such control of both
              instruments and material = equals = musicality.

              Who are these guys? NYC - Long Island, 1929.

              The clarinetist has the funky-ness of Dodds yet the control of Bigard. Omer
              Simeon?

              The trumpeter has the brilliance of Jabbo. Could it be Cootie or (gasp)
              Freddie Jenkins?

              The trombonist really cuts the mustard. The aggressiveness of Higginbotham
              without the trademark snake-shake. Big Charlie Green?

              The saxophonist is advanced beyond what Hawkins was doing at the time. He
              plays one chord wrong in his solo and seems to have the technique of a
              clarinetist. Almost like Bechet on alto - imagine that.

              The banjoist plays whole-tone scales in his first break and demonstrates a
              blusey-ness that is rarely heard on the instrument. Bela Fleck?

              The composition/arrangement is also quite sophisticated - some unusual
              harmonic twists here and there and very interesting orchestration in
              general. I can't imagine that they played this piece much - probably
              sight-reading it in the studio.

              In some ways, the piece is like Arthur Schutt meets Jelly Roll Morton.

              "Crying For You (Baby Mine)" is not as impressive - but it does have some
              very good moments. The theme has an unusually wide ranging melody and there
              are some interesting harmonies - but not radical as in RHH.

              Any comments on personnel?

              Cheers,

              Andrew Homzy, Montréal
            • Andrew Homzy
              Dear Chris, Thanks for the info. I was on the mark with Higginbotham - he did leave out his trademark snake-shake. Who is cornetist/trumpeter Walter Bennett?
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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                Dear Chris,

                Thanks for the info.

                I was on the mark with Higginbotham - he did leave out his trademark
                snake-shake.

                Who is cornetist/trumpeter Walter Bennett? This guy deserved wonderful
                career.

                Mabel Horsey on piano? What did J.C. do?

                Any other guesses about the clarinet, alto & banjo?

                * The clarinetist has the funky-ness of Dodds yet the control of Bigard.
                Omer Simeon?

                * The saxophonist is advanced beyond what Hawkins was doing at the time. He
                plays one chord wrong in his solo and seems to have the technique of a
                clarinetist. Almost like Bechet on alto - imagine that.

                * The banjoist plays whole-tone scales in his first break and demonstrates a
                blusey-ness that is rarely heard on the instrument. Bela Fleck?

                * The composition/arrangement is also quite sophisticated - some unusual
                harmonic twists here and there and very interesting orchestration in
                general. I can't imagine that they played this piece much - probably
                sight-reading it in the studio.

                * In some ways, the piece is like Arthur Schutt meets Jelly Roll Morton.

                Cheers,

                Andrew Homzy, Montreal

                From: Chris Smith <chris@...>
                Reply-To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:25:42 +0100
                To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] NEW SONGS - J.C. Johnson and his Five Hot Sparks
                > Any comments on personnel?
                >
                Rust gives Walter Bennett, c[ornet]; J.C. Higginbotham, tb; unknown; cl;
                unknown, as; Mabel Horsey, p; unknown, bj.

                Chris Smith
                (chris@...)
                The Schoolhouse
                OUT SKERRIES
                Shetland ZE2 9AS
                Scotland UK



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Andrew Homzy
                Dear Scott, Thank you for more details. To my last post, I also ask: Who is George James and if he played alto sax so well, why isn t he better known, It also
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 28, 2004
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                  Dear Scott,

                  Thank you for more details.

                  To my last post, I also ask:

                  Who is George James and if he played alto sax so well, why isn't he better
                  known,

                  It also seems I was on-the-mark with Simeon & Jabbo.

                  Is Ikey Robinson really that good on banjo? What other recordings come to
                  mind where he is so prominent?

                  Cheers,

                  Andrew Homzy, Montréal

                  From: Scott Alexander <scott@...>
                  Reply-To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 09:39:42 -0700
                  To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] NEW SONGS - J.C. Johnson and his Five Hot Sparks


                  The latest Rust guesses that the following personnel played on the record:
                  Walter Bennett - Cornet
                  Mabel Horsey - Piano (but then says that J.C. Johnson's other records are of
                  no jazz interest?)
                  Charlie Vincento - Banjo
                  Everyone else is unknown.

                  The Biograph LP that the songs came from has the following guesses but is
                  not sure of any of it:
                  Jabbo Smith - Cornet
                  Roy Palmer - Trombone
                  George James - Clarinet or Alto Sax or both
                  Omer Simeon - Clarinet
                  Mabel Horsey or J.C. Johnson - Piano (they acknowledge Rust's guess of Mabel
                  being the pianist but wonder why J.C. Johnson is not listed when his name is
                  on the label)
                  Ikey Robinson - Banjo


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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