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FW: Jazz Delicious Hot Disgusting Cold

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  • David Brown
    This is Dave but the post is from Nick Dellow, a new member who had dificulty posting himself. Really fascinating stuff for all admirers of JRT and T 7. Many
    Message 1 of 2 , May 17, 2006
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      This is Dave but the post is from Nick Dellow, a new member who had
      dificulty posting himself. Really fascinating stuff for all admirers of JRT
      and T 7. Many thanks
      Nick------------------------------------------------------------------------
      -----






      I think John was responsible for a lot of the Temps' arrangements.
      When I interviewed him in 2001 for VJM magazine he said to me: "I
      never really understood why Phil Harrison and Alan Cooper came to me
      and said: "Would I arrange for the Temperance Seven?" I was not
      known as an arranger. I think I was only known as an enthusiast of
      that period of music. The band already played `You're Driving me
      Crazy' but they didn't sound the way they sounded by the time we
      recorded them. The interesting thing about the band was that somehow
      they had understood and captured an element of the spirit of 1920s
      music."

      The fact that John already had a substantial collection of original
      recordings obviously meant that he had a vast potential catalogue on
      which to call, and he admitted to me that he "cribbed mercilessly".
      So the Temps' "That Certain Party" and "I Wonder What Became of
      Joe" bear more than a passing resemblance to the Goofus Five's
      versions of the numbers, and of course "Words" follows Henderson. I
      think John was being a little hard on himself, because he adapted
      them beautifully to fit the needs of the band. Of course, the main
      advantage of the band was the fact so many of its members could
      double up on other instruments, allowing the arranger scope and
      resulting in a much bigger sound than the actual size of band would
      indicate. As you know, John played mainly trombone and alto sax (and
      he is the sax soloist in "Charlie My Boy ") with the Temps, though
      he could play virtually anything handed to him!

      John commented: "We had rapid instrument changes during recordings,
      some of them down to a beat and a half! I remember playing at the
      Hammersmith Palais on one occasion and suddenly we were aware that
      the dancing had ceased. There was this phalanx around at the
      bandstand, of which at least 50% I would say were musicians. Not
      just the current generation of trad musicians but other guys. They
      were standing close by, literally with their mouths open, jaws
      hanging somewhere near the floor."

      John also told me a funny comment that George Martin made to him,
      after John suggested how the band should be set up in the studio in
      order to achieve that authentic 1920s sound (John himself being a
      renowned sound engineer of course): "Remember this, we are not
      recording the Temperance Seven. We are making a gramophone record!"
      Martin also said: "Oh no, we never go out to a live performance,
      lest it should destroy our ear for making gramophone records"

      Nick




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    • David Brown
      ... From: Nick Dellow [mailto:nick.dellow@gmail.com] Sent: Mittwoch, 17. Mai 2006 13:10 To: David Brown Subject: Re: Jazz Delicious Hot Disgusting Cold Hi
      Message 2 of 2 , May 17, 2006
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        -----Original Message-----
        From: Nick Dellow [mailto:nick.dellow@...]
        Sent: Mittwoch, 17. Mai 2006 13:10
        To: David Brown
        Subject: Re: Jazz Delicious Hot Disgusting Cold


        Hi Dave,

        Yes, please go ahead and post my message, many thanks.

        You might like to add that Part Two of my article on John R.T. is still
        available by clicking on:-

        http://www.vjm.biz/articles9.htm




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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