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Louis Armstrong's New Orleans by Thomas Brothers

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  • Scott Alexander
    Last week I read a new book called Louis Armstrong s New Orleans by Thomas Brothers and I thought it was very good. The book is not a standard biography of
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 16, 2006
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      Last week I read a new book called "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans" by
      Thomas Brothers and I thought it was very good. The book is not a
      standard biography of Armstrong's life but rather a scholarly
      examination of the culture that shaped him and his music. The author
      Thomas Brother's does a convincing job of piecing together a lot of
      diverse quotes from oral histories, interviews, etc. to paint a picture
      the unique music scene that existed in New Orleans during Armstrong's
      life in the city and how it shaped Armstrong's music. This book is
      definitely the most serious examination of Armstrong's early musical
      life that has ever been published and one of the better books about the
      beginnings of jazz in New Orleans.

      http://www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall05/006109.htm

      Scott Alexander
      The Red Hot Jazz Archive
      www.redhotjazz.com
    • Robert Greenwood
      ... by ... author ... picture ... Armstrong s ... musical ... the ... I spent much of the recent holiday season reading this book and endorse Scott s comments
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 4, 2008
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        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Scott Alexander <scott@...> wrote:
        >
        > Last week I read a new book called "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans"
        by
        > Thomas Brothers and I thought it was very good. The book is not a
        > standard biography of Armstrong's life but rather a scholarly
        > examination of the culture that shaped him and his music. The
        author
        > Thomas Brother's does a convincing job of piecing together a lot of
        > diverse quotes from oral histories, interviews, etc. to paint a
        picture
        > the unique music scene that existed in New Orleans during
        Armstrong's
        > life in the city and how it shaped Armstrong's music. This book is
        > definitely the most serious examination of Armstrong's early
        musical
        > life that has ever been published and one of the better books about
        the
        > beginnings of jazz in New Orleans.
        >

        I spent much of the recent holiday season reading this book and
        endorse Scott's comments unreservedly. Anyone who seeks to understand
        what New Orleans music is all about must read this book. I believe
        it's now available in a paperback edition.
        Robert Greenwood
      • Howard Rye
        Me-too-ism in newsgroups is justifiably regarded as a waste of bandwidth, but I must endorse this! This is one of the most important books ever written about
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 4, 2008
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          Me-too-ism in newsgroups is justifiably regarded as a waste of bandwidth,
          but I must endorse this! This is one of the most important books ever
          written about jazz. Just read it!!


          on 4/1/08 10:47, Robert Greenwood at robertgreenwood_54uk@... wrote:

          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> ,
          Scott Alexander <scott@...> wrote:
          >
          > Last week I read a new book called "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans"
          by
          > Thomas Brothers and I thought it was very good. The book is not a
          > standard biography of Armstrong's life but rather a scholarly
          > examination of the culture that shaped him and his music. The
          author
          > Thomas Brother's does a convincing job of piecing together a lot of
          > diverse quotes from oral histories, interviews, etc. to paint a
          picture
          > the unique music scene that existed in New Orleans during
          Armstrong's
          > life in the city and how it shaped Armstrong's music. This book is
          > definitely the most serious examination of Armstrong's early
          musical
          > life that has ever been published and one of the better books about
          the
          > beginnings of jazz in New Orleans.
          >

          I spent much of the recent holiday season reading this book and
          endorse Scott's comments unreservedly. Anyone who seeks to understand
          what New Orleans music is all about must read this book. I believe
          it's now available in a paperback edition.
          Robert Greenwood





          Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          howard@...
          Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ron L
          I have this book in paperback. I don t get much time to read it much but what I ve read so far sure is interesting. Ron L ... From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 4, 2008
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            I have this book in paperback. I don't get much time to read it much but
            what I've read so far sure is interesting.

            Ron L

            -----Original Message-----
            From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Robert Greenwood
            Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 5:48 AM
            To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: Louis Armstrong's New Orleans by Thomas Brothers

            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Scott Alexander <scott@...> wrote:
            >
            > Last week I read a new book called "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans"
            by
            > Thomas Brothers and I thought it was very good. The book is not a
            > standard biography of Armstrong's life but rather a scholarly
            > examination of the culture that shaped him and his music. The
            author
            > Thomas Brother's does a convincing job of piecing together a lot of
            > diverse quotes from oral histories, interviews, etc. to paint a
            picture
            > the unique music scene that existed in New Orleans during
            Armstrong's
            > life in the city and how it shaped Armstrong's music. This book is
            > definitely the most serious examination of Armstrong's early
            musical
            > life that has ever been published and one of the better books about
            the
            > beginnings of jazz in New Orleans.
            >

            I spent much of the recent holiday season reading this book and
            endorse Scott's comments unreservedly. Anyone who seeks to understand
            what New Orleans music is all about must read this book. I believe
            it's now available in a paperback edition.
            Robert Greenwood





            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Robert Greenwood
            ... bandwidth, Point taken, but Scott s original e-mail was sent to the group as long ago as 2006, and now the book is available in a paperback edition and it
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 4, 2008
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              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
              >
              > Me-too-ism in newsgroups is justifiably regarded as a waste of
              bandwidth,

              Point taken, but Scott's original e-mail was sent to the group as
              long ago as 2006, and now the book is available in a paperback
              edition and it is, as you say, Howard, one of the most important
              books ever written on jazz. Brothers ably demystifies a subject that
              has suffered from more romantic tosh than any other. I think this is
              the first time an author has rightly placed so much emphasis on so
              many of the right things such as the influx into New Orleans of
              African-Americans from the surrounding plantation areas bringing with
              them their musical traditions. There are also excellent chapters on
              the creoles and the Canal Street Uptown/Downtown divide (both its
              preservation and its transgression), on the Baptist and Sanctified
              churches, on the brass bands, and on the fraternal clubs.
              The only solecism I have detected is where Brothers seems to think
              that a brass band in 1910 could have played Just a Closer Walk with
              Thee. Strangely, Tom Bethell's biography of George Lewis is cited in
              the bibliography and, in that book, Bethell discusses how JACWWT came
              to be incorporated into the repertoire. Wasn't this tune first
              recorded in the 1940s by Sister Rosetta Tharpe?
              Robert Greenwood
            • Howard Rye
              Rosetta Tharpe s December 1941 recording is certainly the earliest I can easily locate. It was recorded again a few months later by the Selah Jubilee Singers,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 4, 2008
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                Rosetta Tharpe's December 1941 recording is certainly the earliest I can
                easily locate. It was recorded again a few months later by the Selah Jubilee
                Singers, and then collected twice by field workers during July 1942, from
                the Rev. E.M. Martin of Christian Springs, Mississippi and from the Silent
                Grove Baptist Church in nearby Clarksdale. Which looks like a copybook
                example of recorded material making its way into "the tradition". Except
                that we can never be sure the field-worker didn't ask whether they knew it
                and got back something they'd heard on the radio by way of humoring the
                stranger!

                George Lewis first recorded it in May 1943 and Bethell certainly believed
                this was the first jazz recording.


                on 4/1/08 15:23, Robert Greenwood at robertgreenwood_54uk@... wrote:

                --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
                >
                > Me-too-ism in newsgroups is justifiably regarded as a waste of
                bandwidth,

                Point taken, but Scott's original e-mail was sent to the group as
                long ago as 2006, and now the book is available in a paperback
                edition and it is, as you say, Howard, one of the most important
                books ever written on jazz. Brothers ably demystifies a subject that
                has suffered from more romantic tosh than any other. I think this is
                the first time an author has rightly placed so much emphasis on so
                many of the right things such as the influx into New Orleans of
                African-Americans from the surrounding plantation areas bringing with
                them their musical traditions. There are also excellent chapters on
                the creoles and the Canal Street Uptown/Downtown divide (both its
                preservation and its transgression), on the Baptist and Sanctified
                churches, on the brass bands, and on the fraternal clubs.
                The only solecism I have detected is where Brothers seems to think
                that a brass band in 1910 could have played Just a Closer Walk with
                Thee. Strangely, Tom Bethell's biography of George Lewis is cited in
                the bibliography and, in that book, Bethell discusses how JACWWT came
                to be incorporated into the repertoire. Wasn't this tune first
                recorded in the 1940s by Sister Rosetta Tharpe?
                Robert Greenwood





                Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                howard@...
                Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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