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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Trumpet/Cornet

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  • Andrew Homzy
    Modernists on the cornet: Perhaps Don Cherry - who played with Ornette Coleman. Although he later played the pocket trumpet which brings the bell closer to
    Message 1 of 48 , Dec 20, 2005
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      Modernists on the cornet: Perhaps Don Cherry - who played with Ornette
      Coleman. Although he later played the "pocket trumpet" which brings the bell
      closer to the ears - and the extra tight winding of the tubing (cylindrical
      was the word I was seeking in my last post) literally takes the edges off
      the standard trumpet tone.

      I like your description of the flügelhorn: a flaccid and porky instrument. I
      think that Art Farmer lost not only tonal but emotional projection when he
      decided to play the porker permanently.

      Cheers,

      Andrew Homzy, Montréal

      > From: David Brown <johnhaleysims@...>
      > Reply-To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2005 12:16:31 +0000 (GMT)
      > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Trumpet/Cornet
      >
      > Andrew, yes indeed
      >
      > But I think the situation is complicated somewhat by the unfortunate trend
      > starting early 60s for trumpeters to double flugel, a flaccid and porky
      > instrument. Shorty Rogers was playing it on the Coast in the early 50s but I
      > guess the impetus was from Miles. There is footage of Eldridge -- with the
      > fiercest and most various of trumpet tones -- playing one. Chet did, although
      > with his beautiful trumpet sound he needed to least. Butterfield and Bill
      > Coleman ended up playing more flugel than trumpet, Art Farmer exclusively
      > flugel till he invented the flumpet. I do think maybe the flugel is easier to
      > play and certainly kinder to ageing and uncertain intonation.
      >
      > Trumpeters who should have played cornet ? The E.Coast cool school come to
      > mind but both Phil Sunkel & Don Joseph did at least double cornet. Fruscella
      > played trumpet but had a cornet temperament maybe ? Miles ? He had that
      > rather wimpy sound but usually had the mute in anyway. Red Rodney always had a
      > full rounded sound for a bopper but also later switched to flugel. Clifford ?
      > He had a much softer sound and I can well imagine him on cornet.
      >
      > Yes Braff was great and can we recognise a difference between his cornet and
      > trumpet and if so was it just age that mellowed him ?
      >
      > Dave
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • Andrew Homzy
      Modernists on the cornet: Perhaps Don Cherry - who played with Ornette Coleman. Although he later played the pocket trumpet which brings the bell closer to
      Message 48 of 48 , Dec 20, 2005
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        Modernists on the cornet: Perhaps Don Cherry - who played with Ornette
        Coleman. Although he later played the "pocket trumpet" which brings the bell
        closer to the ears - and the extra tight winding of the tubing (cylindrical
        was the word I was seeking in my last post) literally takes the edges off
        the standard trumpet tone.

        I like your description of the flügelhorn: a flaccid and porky instrument. I
        think that Art Farmer lost not only tonal but emotional projection when he
        decided to play the porker permanently.

        Cheers,

        Andrew Homzy, Montréal

        > From: David Brown <johnhaleysims@...>
        > Reply-To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2005 12:16:31 +0000 (GMT)
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Trumpet/Cornet
        >
        > Andrew, yes indeed
        >
        > But I think the situation is complicated somewhat by the unfortunate trend
        > starting early 60s for trumpeters to double flugel, a flaccid and porky
        > instrument. Shorty Rogers was playing it on the Coast in the early 50s but I
        > guess the impetus was from Miles. There is footage of Eldridge -- with the
        > fiercest and most various of trumpet tones -- playing one. Chet did, although
        > with his beautiful trumpet sound he needed to least. Butterfield and Bill
        > Coleman ended up playing more flugel than trumpet, Art Farmer exclusively
        > flugel till he invented the flumpet. I do think maybe the flugel is easier to
        > play and certainly kinder to ageing and uncertain intonation.
        >
        > Trumpeters who should have played cornet ? The E.Coast cool school come to
        > mind but both Phil Sunkel & Don Joseph did at least double cornet. Fruscella
        > played trumpet but had a cornet temperament maybe ? Miles ? He had that
        > rather wimpy sound but usually had the mute in anyway. Red Rodney always had a
        > full rounded sound for a bopper but also later switched to flugel. Clifford ?
        > He had a much softer sound and I can well imagine him on cornet.
        >
        > Yes Braff was great and can we recognise a difference between his cornet and
        > trumpet and if so was it just age that mellowed him ?
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new Yahoo!
        > Security Centre.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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