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Re: [RawPortland] green smoothies

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  • Walker Traylor
    I ve been warned not to eat the greens of tomatoes and other nightshades, with the claim that they contain toxins which are especially problematic, as they
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 5, 2005
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      I've been warned not to eat the greens of tomatoes and other nightshades, with the claim that they contain toxins which are especially problematic, as they don't get eliminated naturally from the body.  Anyone got more information to confirm or deny this?

      Also, I'm new to the Portland area, and just moved in from Raleigh, NC.  Are the green smoothie recipes posted anywhere?  I bought a nice juicer, but quickly learned to like the full pureed vegetables in my blender.  I just throw in a bunch of stuff, without regard to what I'm putting in.  Some examples would be great.  

      I look forward to meeting everyone at the potlucks as they are posted, and hosting a few once my place is established and moved into.

      Walker

      On Aug 5, 2005, at 3:16 PM, hollywand77 wrote:

      Hi

      I was wondering if anyone had any tips on unconventional greens to
      add
      to the green smoothies (I got hooked on them after Victoria
      Boutenko's
      talk).  She mentioned that one could use beet greens, carrot greens 
      etc (Someone once told me that carrot greens are poisonous, is that
      true perhaps in large doses or complete fiction? ). 

      In my garden we are growing tomatoes and does anyone know if tomato
      greens are edible---they smell so good...but I am cautious to try it
      in case they aren't meant to be eaten.

      Any tips on figuring out what may be edible out in the wild for
      foraging?  Any suggested books on the matter? 

      Thanks!




      YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





    • Gabrielle
      ... Gabrielle
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 5, 2005
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        hollywand77 wrote:

        > Hi
        >
        > I have heard and believe that tomato greens are poisonous, being in
        > the solanum or nightshade family along with potatoes, whose greens are
        > also poisonous--even the green sheen on a potato exposed to light can
        > be sickening. I don't know about carrot tops, but I have slipped some
        > into my green smoothies with no ill effects. It's related to parsley,
        > which I use. (But so is poison hemlock!) My sense is if you avoid
        > anything that tastes acrid or medicinal like bay leaves and don't
        > overdo any one green over a long period of time, experimenting is
        > safe. We use beet green and chard a lot now that the spinach is over
        > for the summer. One of the best weeds, in full abundance now, is
        > purslane, a rare vegetable source of essential fatty acid. I also
        > grow the garden variety, golden purslane, to use in salads. Chickweed,
        > more abundant in spring, is mild and good. Violet leaves, especially
        > in the spring, are great. Mallow, in the Hollyhock family is tasty
        > and most gardeners hate this weed. Pigweed or lambs quarters are good
        > too. I often add lemon balm, which is practically a weed in Oregon
        > gardens, mint, and fennel fronds for a nice herb-y touch. Plant some
        > mache (also called corn salad) in the next few weeks to have these
        > abundant little rosettes all winter--we made mache smoothies daily
        > from November on while waiting for the spinach. I've also used leaves
        > of comfrey, stinging nettle, and ginko in the mix for their herbal
        > value as well as nutrition. I also sneak in some dried seaweed--not
        > enough to ruin the taste, though. One thing that doesn't work for us
        > is anything in the mustard family like arugula or peppergrass. Some
        > kales and chicory have too much bite for our taste, too.

        Gabrielle



        > I was wondering if anyone had any tips on unconventional greens to
        > add
        > to the green smoothies (I got hooked on them after Victoria
        > Boutenko's
        > talk). She mentioned that one could use beet greens, carrot greens
        > etc (Someone once told me that carrot greens are poisonous, is that
        > true perhaps in large doses or complete fiction? ).
        >
        > In my garden we are growing tomatoes and does anyone know if tomato
        > greens are edible---they smell so good...but I am cautious to try it
        > in case they aren't meant to be eaten.
        >
        > Any tips on figuring out what may be edible out in the wild for
        > foraging? Any suggested books on the matter?
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        >
        >
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      • Celeste Crimi
        Dear Walker, Welcome to Oregon! Poisonous or not, I certainly empathize with your attraction toward all parts tomato! Especially when the sun has been warming
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 12, 2005
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          Dear Walker,
           
          Welcome to Oregon!
           
          Poisonous or not, I certainly empathize with your attraction toward all parts tomato!  Especially when the sun has been warming their scent, I find just being near tomato vines a true pleasure.
           
          And I have asked myself the same questions about whether or not the greens are to be avoided. 
           
          For myself, I have decided that just as with any fine perfume, I will enjoy their scent, but not consider them edible.
           
          Incidentally, this is how I've survived as all-raw, in a world where I'm constantly bombarded with the strong smells of cooked food.  I'm reprogrammed to feel that it may smell nice, but that doesn't make it food (just as with certain perfumes).
           
          My favorite green smoothie changes from day to day, week to week.  Favorites this week have included (approximately equal parts of each component):
           
          banana/nectarine/ice/water/kale
           
          strawberry/nectarine/ice/water/kale
           
          banana/ice/water/kale/ (optional:  add 1 Tbsp agave and 1 Tbsp cacao)
           
          blueberry/ice/water/kale
           
          banana/blueberry/ice/water/kale
           
          a couple of times this week I've subbed celery for kale, but be prepared for a slight texture change.  Yes, I know, those who know me will wonder where the weeds are in these recipes--I've been traveling and super busy this week, so have been relying on market-bought food.
           
          mmmm...except for the hikes up in Washington...from-the-trail stinging nettles, clover flowers, thistle flowers (just the sweet, purple parts), thimble berries, raspberries, blackberries, etc....are we lucky, or what?!
           
          smiling breeze,
          Celeste in Beaverton
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 3:47 PM
          Subject: Re: [RawPortland] green smoothies

          I've been warned not to eat the greens of tomatoes and other nightshades, with the claim that they contain toxins which are especially problematic, as they don't get eliminated naturally from the body.  Anyone got more information to confirm or deny this?

          Also, I'm new to the Portland area, and just moved in from Raleigh, NC.  Are the green smoothie recipes posted anywhere?  I bought a nice juicer, but quickly learned to like the full pureed vegetables in my blender.  I just throw in a bunch of stuff, without regard to what I'm putting in.  Some examples would be great.  

          I look forward to meeting everyone at the potlucks as they are posted, and hosting a few once my place is established and moved into.

          Walker

          On Aug 5, 2005, at 3:16 PM, hollywand77 wrote:

          Hi

          I was wondering if anyone had any tips on unconventional greens to
          add
          to the green smoothies (I got hooked on them after Victoria
          Boutenko's
          talk).  She mentioned that one could use beet greens, carrot greens 
          etc (Someone once told me that carrot greens are poisonous, is that
          true perhaps in large doses or complete fiction? ). 

          In my garden we are growing tomatoes and does anyone know if tomato
          greens are edible---they smell so good...but I am cautious to try it
          in case they aren't meant to be eaten.

          Any tips on figuring out what may be edible out in the wild for
          foraging?  Any suggested books on the matter? 

          Thanks!




          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





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