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Autumn Olives Elaeagnus umbellata... harvest invitation

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  • William Milmoe
    Second opportunity - the other tree - larger then the first and maturing a month later. Please arrange a time for this high nutrient dense fresh sour berry
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 19, 2010
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      Second opportunity - the other tree - larger then the first and
      maturing a month later.

      Please arrange a time for this high nutrient dense fresh sour berry
      (low glycemic). I would like to ask that you donate half of your
      harvest so I can arrange an ORAC test to analyze/confirm the nutrient
      value.

      Thank you so very much.

      Bill Milmoe
      Meadows Tilth Urban Farm
      Vancouver WA 98661 (just off I-205)
      360 695 4482

      http://www.psa-rising.com/eatingwell/wild-foods/autumnolive.htm

      Fordham's colleague, Beverly Clevidence, analyzed the berries. Her
      analysis showed that, ounce for ounce, the typical autumn olive berry
      is up to 17 times higher in lycopene than the typical raw tomato
      (80-90 per cent of the US intake of this nutrient comes from tomatoes
      and tomato products).

      "The red berries of autumn olive have a high carotenoid content,"
      writes Fordham, "and particularly high levels of lycopene (30-70
      mg/100g). Lycopene has powerful antioxidant properties, making it of
      interest for nutraceutical use."

      The berries also contain high levels of vitamins A, C and E, and
      flavonoids and essential fatty acids. Lycopene is their main
      attraction, though. Lycopene, adds Clevidence, who heads ARS'
      Phytonutrients Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, has generated
      widespread interest as a possible deterrent to heart disease and
      cancers of the prostate, cervix and gastrointestinal tract.

      US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Fruit Lab gave the fruit a new
      name (or an old name made new again) -- Autumnberry. They've opened an
      Autumnberry Research Lab. "A New Fruit for Processing: Autumnberry,
      Aki-gumi, or Autumn olive, they say, has "Organic Farming
      Possibilities." Requires little or no fertilizer. Easily harvested by
      hand or machine. Flavorful fruit.


      Although some farmers and horticulturalists grow autumn olive as a
      nurse tree, which prepares the ground for black walnut trees, many
      consider it too invasive to let stand. It makes sturdy hedgerows and
      windbreaks and nourishes the soil in old fields; but in Maine its
      nitrogen-fixing ability is blamed for interfering "with the nitrogen
      cycle of native communities that may depend on infertile soils."
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