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Gallbladder Flushes - Topic today with Dr. Michael Klapper at VegFest

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  • William Milmoe
    Since investigating Raw foods 10 years ago I have heard of the gallbladder flush as an alternative to gallbladder removal surgery. Three years ago I heard of
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 18, 2010
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      Since investigating Raw foods 10 years ago I have heard of "the
      gallbladder flush" as an alternative to gallbladder removal surgery.

      Three years ago I heard of a person who was not a raw foodist nor
      someone selling raw food books or programs who under went a
      "gallbladder flush". She did it because of a painful condition and
      was scheduled for surgery. Her long time childhood friend recommended
      the flush and shepherded her through it. I met her and she got the
      hundred of "stones" and didn't have the painful attack that Dr.
      Klapper says the olive oil would cause nor has she had any symptoms
      for the last two years. This leads me to question Dr. Klapper but one
      case does not dispel his theory.

      If you were diagnosed with gallstones and had a flush and your
      symptoms went away then perhaps you would like to be at his talk at
      the convention center at 1:30 Sunday Sep 19th.

      If Dr. Klapper is right then these people were misdiagnosed but it
      does not explain why their symptoms went away with what he calls a
      "snake oil" cure. His theory also says that doctors are taking
      gallbladders out for no good reason.

      If you want in a group to challenge him then please email me back and
      we can meet before the talk under the pendulum.

      Thank you.

      Bill Milmoe
    • Nora Lenz
      Hi Bill, There is an explanation, but it has nothing to do with what the person added to her body. Her symptoms went away because of what she took away --
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 19, 2010
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        Hi Bill,
        There is an explanation, but it has nothing to do with what the person added to her body.  Her symptoms went away because of what she took away -- namely, the foods in her diet that were causing the problem.  Even if she only stopped eating them for the period during which she was doing the "cleanse", this was obviously sufficient to allow her body to resolve the problem.  There is nothing except belief to connect the cessation of her symptoms to the expelled "stones", because if she had fasted on water only and spared her body the effort of digesting the oils, she'd have also experienced relief, only without the "stones". 
         
        An article appeared in The Lancet a few years ago about these flushes that makes a lot more sense than thinking that olive oil has special curative properties.  I'm not sure if they still make it available on line so I'm pasting it below, in its entirety.  I'm not usually one for either reading or quoting medical journals but when people apply real science, as was done in the analysis described in the article, important information can be gleaned.  The bad news is that medicine very often doesn't work this way.
         
        It should also be pointed out that even though your friend wasn't a raw foodist, people hardly ever do things like gall bladder flushes in isolation.  That is, they very often make meaningful changes to their diets and lifestyles, as well, the kind that really do bear positively on health.  It is these improved habits that account for the health improvements they experience.  Unfortunately, the medical belief system being what it is, people prefer to give (undue) credit to whatever remedies or supplements they ingested. 
         
        I'm not familiar with what Dr. Klaper has had to say recently but he's correct in his condemnation of gallbladder flushes.  That he attributes the relief people experience after doing them to misdiagnosis leads me to suspect he doesn't have a full and proper understanding of what's really going on, however.  (That's not to say that misdiagnosis is never a factor, or couldn't be a factor, but it's remote compared to more likely explanations.)
         
        I suppose there are times when the gall bladder is too far gone to save but this is probably very rare.  Nobody needs to lose their gall bladder.  All that is necessary is to stop abusing it, and it will repair itself.
         
        Best wishes,
        Nora
         
         
         

        Could these be gallstones?

        by Christian W Sies and Jim Brooker

        A 40-year-old woman was referred to the outpatient clinic with a 3-month history of recurrent severe right hypochondrial pain after fatty food. Abdominal ultrasound showed multiple 1–2 mm gallstones in the gallbladder.

        She had recently followed a “liver cleansing” regime on the advice of a herbalist. This regime consisted of free intake of apple and vegetable juice until 1800 h, but no food, followed by the consumption of 600 mL of olive oil and 300 mL of lemon juice over several hours. This activity resulted in the painless passage of multiple semisolid green “stones” per rectum in the early hours of the next morning. She collected them, stored them in the freezer, and presented them in the clinic (figure).

        Semi-solid green “stones” passed per rectum (top) and surgically removed cholesterol gallstones (bottom)
        Figure. Semi-solid green “stones” passed per rectum (top) and surgically removed cholesterol gallstones (bottom)

        Microscopic examination of our patient's stones revealed that they lacked any crystalline structure, melted to an oily green liquid after 10 min at 40°C, and contained no cholesterol, bilirubin, or calcium by established wet chemical methods.1 Traditional faecal fat extraction techniques2 indicated that the stones contained fatty acids that required acid hydrolysis to give free fatty acids before extraction into ether. These fatty acids accounted for 75% of the original material.

        Experimentation revealed that mixing equal volumes of oleic acid (the major component of olive oil) and lemon juice produced several semi solid white balls after the addition of a small volume of a potassium hydroxide solution. On air drying at room temperature, these balls became quite solid and hard.

        We conclude, therefore, that these green “stones” resulted from the action of gastric lipases on the simple and mixed triacylglycerols that make up olive oil, yielding long chain carboxylic acids (mainly oleic acid). This process was followed by saponification into large insoluble micelles of potassium carboxylates (lemon juice contains a high concentration of potassium) or “soap stones”. The cholesterol stones noted on ultrasound were removed by surgery (figure).

        A search of the internet reveals many health websites promoting so-called “gall-bladder flushing” or “liver cleansing” regimes. Some quote a Correspondence letter published in The Lancet3 on the subject. The 1-day purge usually consists of an overnight fast, then eating apples in the morning, taking only herbal tea through the day, and then in the evening a warm mixture of olive oil (2/3 cup) and fresh lemon juice (1/3 cup). Patients are instructed to then lie on the right side (although some say the left). It is claimed that the next morning the gallstones will pass in the stool.

        We have shown that these flushing regimes for expelling gallstones are a myth, and that the claims made by some are misleading. The appearance of a letter in an establishment journal has been used to legitimise this practice for some time and the record should now be set straight.

        We declare that we have no conflict of interest.

        References

        1Steen G, Blijenberg BG. Chemical analysis of gallstonesEur J Clin Chem Clin Biochem 1991; 29: 801-804. MEDLINE

        2Varley H. Practical clinical biochemistryLondon: Whitfriars Press, 1967:.

        3Dekkers R. Apple juice and the chemical-contact softening of gallstonesLancet 1999; 354: 2171. Full Text | Full-Text PDF (43 KB) | MEDLINE | CrossRef

         

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        Three years ago I heard of a person who was not a raw foodist nor
        someone selling raw food books or programs who under went a
        "gallbladder flush". If Dr. Klapper is right then these people were misdiagnosed but it
        does not explain why their symptoms went away with what he calls a
        "snake oil" cure. His theory also says that doctors are taking
        gallbladders out for no good reason.

        If you want in a group to challenge him then please email me back and
        we can meet before the talk under the pendulum.

        Thank you.

        Bill Milmoe
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