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low iron

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  • KERRY MATSON
    hi everyone ... i ve been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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      hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now.  i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate.  (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.)  i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron.  i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up.  thanks for your time, kerry
       
    • Pamela Melcher
      Hi, Kerry, A food which is spectacularly high in iron is dulse, a type of seaweed. I was once anemic and go over it eating lots of dulse. Good luck! Pamela
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Hi, Kerry,

        A food which is spectacularly high in iron is dulse, a type of seaweed.

        I was once anemic and go over it eating lots of dulse.

        Good luck!

        Pamela Melcher


        From: KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@...>
        To: Raw Portland Yahoo Group <rawportland@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, October 1, 2009 12:42:42 AM
        Subject: [RawPortland] low iron

         

        hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now.  i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate.  (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.)  i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron.  i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up.  thanks for your time, kerry
         


      • Nora Lenz
        The standards they use to judge whether a person s blood is normal are derived from people who eat differently than you do, and the undigested residues of
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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          The standards they use to judge whether a person's blood is "normal" are derived from people who eat differently than you do, and the undigested residues of those unhealthy foods constantly circulate in the blood.  This is thought to be normal, but it' really pathological.  That's why even if your blood looks different than "normal" blood, it doesn't mean you're truly deficient in anything.  If you think of all the assumptions that are made by medical professionals, which we KNOW are erroneous, it's not difficult to dismiss their ideas about iron deficiencies.  I certainly wouldn't allow an experience like this to influence me to change what I was eating (unless I was thinking of making improvements anyway) and I sure wouldn't consider supplementing.  Even if by some rare chance you really were iron deficient, the cause would be your body's inability to use the iron coming in and that which it already has stored, not because of dietary deficiency.  Here's a blurb I cut from the Life Science Course at www.RawFoodExplained.com about iron:

          "Although an improper diet is usually viewed as the main cause of a mineral deficiency, it is also important to realize that a mineral deficiency can occur even when there is an excess of minerals in the diet. Although the minerals may be present, the body, for some reason or other, is unable to digest and assimilate them. In this case, a metabolic deficiency occurs.  For example, in cases of pernicious anemia, which is often viewed as a serious iron deficiency, there is often an excessive amount of iron-containing pigment in all the organs. Post-mortem diagnosis of several anemic patients showed that there was enough iron stored in the spleen to correct the deficiency in the body. The mineral was present, it just was not being metabolized.  Also, in cases with fasting anemic patients, it has been discovered that their number of red blood cells improve and iron is utilized more efficiently while on a fast. It is interesting to note that this occurs when the patient is not receiving any iron at all in his diet. The fasting condition enables the patients to metabolize the iron already stored within their system."

          Best wishes,

          Nora

           

           
        • Cori Barth
          Hi- I used to work for the Red Cross as a phlebotomist/screener.  Dulse is great- kale (really high in iron!) is just about as great, too.  One thing that a
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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            Hi- I used to work for the Red Cross as a phlebotomist/screener.  Dulse is great- kale (really high in iron!) is just about as great, too.  One thing that a lot of people overlook- every mineral has a vitamin necessary to your body's absoption of that mineral.  Just like your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium, you need vitamin C to absorb iron.  You can eat all the iron-rich foods you want, but if you are low on C then it will pass straight through you.  Maybe try adding more dark greens AND vitamin C to your diet.  (even a little lemon in your water will help).  Also, stress, what you had for breakfast, and menstruation have a lot to do with your iron.  Hope next time you sail through the test!  (Even though I always tried to eat well for my iron, I was almost always too low to donate- some people just run low.)  Cori

            --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:

            From: Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...>
            Subject: Re: [RawPortland] low iron
            To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:44 AM

             
            Hi, Kerry,

            A food which is spectacularly high in iron is dulse, a type of seaweed.

            I was once anemic and go over it eating lots of dulse.

            Good luck!

            Pamela Melcher


            From: KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@...>
            To: Raw Portland Yahoo Group <rawportland@ yahoogroups. com>
            Sent: Thursday, October 1, 2009 12:42:42 AM
            Subject: [RawPortland] low iron

             
            hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now.  i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate.  (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.)  i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron.  i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up.  thanks for your time, kerry
             


          • Cori Barth
            Actually, the standards that they use are actually very important- to you and to the person receiving the blood.  If you are very low on iron and a pint of
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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              Actually, the standards that they use are actually very important- to you and to the person receiving the blood.  If you are very low on iron and a pint of blood gets taken from your body that removes yet another (on avverage) 12% of your body's already low iron.  When a donor receives your blood they are sometimes low on iron themselves, so they need a bump in this mineral through your blood.  Also, I have seen countless reactions (passing out, seizures- tetany shock) from people who donated who were borderline passing on the iron count.  Iron is all about red blood cell production and seeing that the patients as well as the donors need high rbc counts, it is better on all fronts to up the iron- at least for the blood draw.  I have seen tons of vegans, vegetarians and raw people donate successfully.  I've also seen many people who say they eat red meat every day get turned away bc of low iron.  Something wonderful about the plan God/nature has for us- all things needed for a healthy diet are available to us in plant form and beans and grains.  You don't need meat to be healthy.  As far as I'm concerned you don't need supplements, either.  Just a healthy balance!

              --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Nora Lenz <nmlenz@...> wrote:

              From: Nora Lenz <nmlenz@...>
              Subject: Re: [RawPortland] low iron
              To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 7:14 AM

               
              The standards they use to judge whether a person's blood is "normal" are derived from people who eat differently than you do, and the undigested residues of those unhealthy foods constantly circulate in the blood.  This is thought to be normal, but it' really pathological.  That's why even if your blood looks different than "normal" blood, it doesn't mean you're truly deficient in anything.  If you think of all the assumptions that are made by medical professionals, which we KNOW are erroneous, it's not difficult to dismiss their ideas about iron deficiencies.  I certainly wouldn't allow an experience like this to influence me to change what I was eating (unless I was thinking of making improvements anyway) and I sure wouldn't consider supplementing.  Even if by some rare chance you really were iron deficient, the cause would be your body's inability to use the iron coming in and that which it already has stored, not because of dietary deficiency.  Here's a blurb I cut from the Life Science Course at www.RawFoodExplaine d.com about iron:
              "Although an improper diet is usually viewed as the main cause of a mineral deficiency, it is also important to realize that a mineral deficiency can occur even when there is an excess of minerals in the diet. Although the minerals may be present, the body, for some reason or other, is unable to digest and assimilate them. In this case, a metabolic deficiency occurs.  For example, in cases of pernicious anemia, which is often viewed as a serious iron deficiency, there is often an excessive amount of iron-containing pigment in all the organs. Post-mortem diagnosis of several anemic patients showed that there was enough iron stored in the spleen to correct the deficiency in the body. The mineral was present, it just was not being metabolized.  Also, in cases with fasting anemic patients, it has been discovered that their number of red blood cells improve and iron is utilized more efficiently while on a fast. It is interesting to note that this occurs when the patient is not receiving any iron at all in his diet. The fasting condition enables the patients to metabolize the iron already stored within their system."
              Best wishes,
              Nora
               
               

            • Cori Barth
              Also, what Nora says is partly right- even if you have enough iron in your blood, is may be malabsobing- Vitamin C!!! ... From: Nora Lenz
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                Also, what Nora says is partly right- even if you have enough iron in your blood, is may be malabsobing- Vitamin C!!!

                --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Nora Lenz <nmlenz@...> wrote:

                From: Nora Lenz <nmlenz@...>
                Subject: Re: [RawPortland] low iron
                To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 7:14 AM

                 
                The standards they use to judge whether a person's blood is "normal" are derived from people who eat differently than you do, and the undigested residues of those unhealthy foods constantly circulate in the blood.  This is thought to be normal, but it' really pathological.  That's why even if your blood looks different than "normal" blood, it doesn't mean you're truly deficient in anything.  If you think of all the assumptions that are made by medical professionals, which we KNOW are erroneous, it's not difficult to dismiss their ideas about iron deficiencies.  I certainly wouldn't allow an experience like this to influence me to change what I was eating (unless I was thinking of making improvements anyway) and I sure wouldn't consider supplementing.  Even if by some rare chance you really were iron deficient, the cause would be your body's inability to use the iron coming in and that which it already has stored, not because of dietary deficiency.  Here's a blurb I cut from the Life Science Course at www.RawFoodExplaine d.com about iron:
                "Although an improper diet is usually viewed as the main cause of a mineral deficiency, it is also important to realize that a mineral deficiency can occur even when there is an excess of minerals in the diet. Although the minerals may be present, the body, for some reason or other, is unable to digest and assimilate them. In this case, a metabolic deficiency occurs.  For example, in cases of pernicious anemia, which is often viewed as a serious iron deficiency, there is often an excessive amount of iron-containing pigment in all the organs. Post-mortem diagnosis of several anemic patients showed that there was enough iron stored in the spleen to correct the deficiency in the body. The mineral was present, it just was not being metabolized.  Also, in cases with fasting anemic patients, it has been discovered that their number of red blood cells improve and iron is utilized more efficiently while on a fast. It is interesting to note that this occurs when the patient is not receiving any iron at all in his diet. The fasting condition enables the patients to metabolize the iron already stored within their system."
                Best wishes,
                Nora
                 
                 

              • Mike Snyder
                Hi Kerry, The Klamath blue-green algae is a great source of Iron. It has 350.70 mcg of Iron per one gram of E3 Live powder. There is 121.69 mcg of iron in one
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                  Hi Kerry,

                  The Klamath blue-green algae is a great source of Iron. It has 350.70 mcg of Iron per one gram of E3 Live powder. There is 121.69 mcg of iron in one tablespoon of E3 Live liquid.

                  You can view the nutrient composition at
                  http://www.TheRawDiet.com/pdf/data_sheet_frozen.pdf
                  http://www.TheRawDiet.com/pdf/data_sheet_dry.pdf

                  The Hippocrates Health Institute has a product called Ocean Energy,
                  http://store.hippocratesinst.org/LifeGive-Ocean-Energy-90-Caps-P120C17.aspx
                  "Ocean Energy helps increase Hemoglobin (iron) levels in the blood."

                  Good luck!

                  Mike Snyder


                  PS. This is a quote from Viktorus Kulvinskas about the Klamath algae and anemia:

                  http://www.TheRawDiet.com/pdf/Viktoras_klamath_algae.pdf

                  The chlorophyll factor in Super Blue Green Algae is ten times that found in
                  grasses. The blue-green algae found in the Upper Klamath Lake is the highest
                  source of chlorophyll you can find; it’s content is 2 to 3 times that found in
                  chlorella or spirulina.

                  This high concentration of chlorophyll leads to overcoming anemia. Hundreds of
                  papers have been published on the work that has been done with crude
                  chlorophyll regarding its relationship to anemia.

                  It has been found that all forms of anemia--including pernicious anemia and
                  anemia of unidentified sources--responded to the therapeutic effect of crude
                  chlorophyll. Anemia is extreme deficiency of oxygen. We cannot live too long
                  without oxygen.

                • sunnymilanna
                  Hi, Kerry, Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                    Hi, Kerry,

                    Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood draws to check on your iron levels until you see they are up. You might even have some issues with your iron and it might not have to do with mainly your diet.

                    You can buy Floradix Iron and Herbs at the helth food store...

                    Also, Yellow Dock is an herb that herbalists use to up iron levels...here is some info:

                    http://www.mothernature.com/Library/Bookshelf/Books/15/58.cfm

                    Hope this helps...

                    Aimee

                    --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                    >
                  • veganchef16
                    I do believe there is a connection of iron and Vitamin C intake but cannot remember the details. I would look up the Vegetarian and Vegan Nutrition book s take
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                      I do believe there is a connection of iron and Vitamin C intake but cannot remember the details. I would look up the Vegetarian and Vegan Nutrition book's take on this... Tammy Russell is a local nutritionist who is vegan and might have some answers for you.

                      --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                      >
                    • Bellinanina
                      David Wolfe is a good resource for this type of information. In his book The Sunfood Diet Success System he goes into great detail of vitamins, minerals,
                      Message 10 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                        David Wolfe is a good resource for this type of information. In his book 'The Sunfood Diet Success System' he goes into great detail of vitamins, minerals, nutrients as well as assimilation and food combining. I have yet to find a more informative vegan resource!

                        http://www.sunfood.com/buy/3/52/5/The-Sunfood-Diet-Success-System---7th-Edition--by-David-Wolfe/0003.aspx

                        :)
                        I read somewhere that suggested eating too much food containing phytic acid can lead to mineral deficiencies.
                        I have to wonder about fresh young Thai coconuts. I know they contain iron as well as many other important minerals. It could be worth looking into!

                        Good luck, Kerry!

                        --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, "veganchef16" <chefal@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I do believe there is a connection of iron and Vitamin C intake but cannot remember the details. I would look up the Vegetarian and Vegan Nutrition book's take on this... Tammy Russell is a local nutritionist who is vegan and might have some answers for you.
                        >
                        > --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                        > >
                        >
                      • Bellinanina
                        Hi Kerry, I did a bit more research and found that raw cacao contains 314% of the US RDA of iron per one ounce serving. Raw chocolate, not a bad way to up the
                        Message 11 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                          Hi Kerry, I did a bit more research and found that raw cacao contains 314% of the US RDA of iron per one ounce serving. Raw chocolate, not a bad way to up the iron intake! :)
                          (sourc; Sunfood Nutrition, based on research of David Wolfe)

                          --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, "sunnymilanna" <sunnymilanna@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi, Kerry,
                          >
                          > Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood draws to check on your iron levels until you see they are up. You might even have some issues with your iron and it might not have to do with mainly your diet.
                          >
                          > You can buy Floradix Iron and Herbs at the helth food store...
                          >
                          > Also, Yellow Dock is an herb that herbalists use to up iron levels...here is some info:
                          >
                          > http://www.mothernature.com/Library/Bookshelf/Books/15/58.cfm
                          >
                          > Hope this helps...
                          >
                          > Aimee
                          >
                          > --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                          > >
                          >
                        • Stacey Fassino
                          I want to recommend discernment with raw cacao usage.  Although David Wolfe is a huge advocate, many raw  well-knowns recommend against eating cacao on a
                          Message 12 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                            I want to recommend discernment with raw cacao usage.  Although David Wolfe is a huge advocate, many raw  "well-knowns" recommend against eating cacao on a regular basis for "health benefits."  The toxic effects off-set any benefits.  http://www.living-foods.com/articles/toxiccacao.html


                            --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Bellinanina <rmlacoste@...> wrote:

                            From: Bellinanina <rmlacoste@...>
                            Subject: [RawPortland] Re: low iron
                            To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12:14 PM

                             

                            Hi Kerry, I did a bit more research and found that raw cacao contains 314% of the US RDA of iron per one ounce serving. Raw chocolate, not a bad way to up the iron intake! :)
                            (sourc; Sunfood Nutrition, based on research of David Wolfe)

                            --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, "sunnymilanna" <sunnymilanna@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi, Kerry,
                            >
                            > Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood draws to check on your iron levels until you see they are up. You might even have some issues with your iron and it might not have to do with mainly your diet.
                            >
                            > You can buy Floradix Iron and Herbs at the helth food store...
                            >
                            > Also, Yellow Dock is an herb that herbalists use to up iron levels...here is some info:
                            >
                            > http://www.motherna ture.com/ Library/Bookshel f/Books/15/ 58.cfm
                            >
                            > Hope this helps...
                            >
                            > Aimee
                            >
                            > --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                            > >
                            >

                          • Pamela Melcher
                            Thank you, Stacey, I have known people who were badly affected by raw chocolate. I think it is important that we in the raw food movement be offering only the
                            Message 13 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                              Thank you, Stacey,

                              I have known people who were badly affected by raw chocolate.

                              I think it is important that we in the raw food movement be offering only the very most healing food in these times of health crisis.

                              We have so much of value to give to the world.

                              It is important that we are completely trustworthy.

                              Happiness, Peace, Health and Abundance for All!

                              Many Blessings to All,
                              Pamela Melcher




                              From: Stacey Fassino <sfassino@...>
                              To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Thursday, October 1, 2009 12:46:57 PM
                              Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Re: low iron

                               

                              I want to recommend discernment with raw cacao usage.  Although David Wolfe is a huge advocate, many raw  "well-knowns" recommend against eating cacao on a regular basis for "health benefits."  The toxic effects off-set any benefits.  http://www.living- foods.com/ articles/ toxiccacao. html


                              --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Bellinanina <rmlacoste@yahoo. com> wrote:

                              From: Bellinanina <rmlacoste@yahoo. com>
                              Subject: [RawPortland] Re: low iron
                              To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12:14 PM

                               

                              Hi Kerry, I did a bit more research and found that raw cacao contains 314% of the US RDA of iron per one ounce serving. Raw chocolate, not a bad way to up the iron intake! :)
                              (sourc; Sunfood Nutrition, based on research of David Wolfe)

                              --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, "sunnymilanna" <sunnymilanna@ ...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi, Kerry,
                              >
                              > Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood draws to check on your iron levels until you see they are up. You might even have some issues with your iron and it might not have to do with mainly your diet.
                              >
                              > You can buy Floradix Iron and Herbs at the helth food store...
                              >
                              > Also, Yellow Dock is an herb that herbalists use to up iron levels...here is some info:
                              >
                              > http://www.mothernature.com/Library/Bookshelf/Books/15/58.cfm
                              >
                              > Hope this helps...
                              >
                              > Aimee
                              >
                              > --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                              > >
                              >


                            • Cori Barth
                              Another thing- if your iron is too low to donate, it doesn t mean you are anemic, or even irregular- they actually look for iron on the higher end of the
                              Message 14 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                                Another thing- if your iron is too low to donate, it doesn't mean you are anemic, or even irregular- they actually look for iron on the higher end of the spectrum, so don't worry unless you are very low.

                                --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:

                                From: Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...>
                                Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Re: low iron
                                To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 3:37 PM

                                 
                                Thank you, Stacey,

                                I have known people who were badly affected by raw chocolate.

                                I think it is important that we in the raw food movement be offering only the very most healing food in these times of health crisis.

                                We have so much of value to give to the world.

                                It is important that we are completely trustworthy.

                                Happiness, Peace, Health and Abundance for All!

                                Many Blessings to All,
                                Pamela Melcher




                                From: Stacey Fassino <sfassino@sbcglobal. net>
                                To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Thursday, October 1, 2009 12:46:57 PM
                                Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Re: low iron

                                 
                                I want to recommend discernment with raw cacao usage.  Although David Wolfe is a huge advocate, many raw  "well-knowns" recommend against eating cacao on a regular basis for "health benefits."  The toxic effects off-set any benefits.  http://www.living- foods.com/ articles/ toxiccacao. html


                                --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Bellinanina <rmlacoste@yahoo. com> wrote:

                                From: Bellinanina <rmlacoste@yahoo. com>
                                Subject: [RawPortland] Re: low iron
                                To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12:14 PM

                                 
                                Hi Kerry, I did a bit more research and found that raw cacao contains 314% of the US RDA of iron per one ounce serving. Raw chocolate, not a bad way to up the iron intake! :)
                                (sourc; Sunfood Nutrition, based on research of David Wolfe)

                                --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, "sunnymilanna" <sunnymilanna@ ...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hi, Kerry,
                                >
                                > Low iron levels are pretty serious so you should look for other ways to get your iron levels up more quickly. You should also have regular blood draws to check on your iron levels until you see they are up. You might even have some issues with your iron and it might not have to do with mainly your diet.
                                >
                                > You can buy Floradix Iron and Herbs at the helth food store...
                                >
                                > Also, Yellow Dock is an herb that herbalists use to up iron levels...here is some info:
                                >
                                > http://www.motherna ture.com/ Library/Bookshel f/Books/15/ 58.cfm
                                >
                                > Hope this helps...
                                >
                                > Aimee
                                >
                                > --- In RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com, KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                                > >
                                >



                              • Jeff Rogers
                                Here is a link to an extensive list of whole foods ad their iron content. I have found no listing of cacao beans or nibs from the USDA Nutrient Database to
                                Message 15 of 16 , Oct 1, 2009
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                                  Here is a link to an extensive list of whole foods ad their iron
                                  content. I have found no listing of cacao beans or nibs from the USDA
                                  Nutrient Database to confirm iron content.

                                  http://www.soystache.com/iron.htm

                                  Thanks,

                                  Jeff
                                • nightowlnation
                                  Floradix is a vegetarian liquid source of iron. First learned of it from an herbalist I studied under and worked for a few decades ago. I ve noticed it s a bit
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Oct 9, 2009
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                                    Floradix is a vegetarian liquid source of iron. First learned of it from an herbalist I studied under and worked for a few decades ago. I've noticed it's a bit expensive here in Portland. But if you're ever in dire need of therapeutic dosing, it's amazing. I've had intermittent issues with anemia and many of the standard supplements literally leave, for me, an unmanageable taste behind. Floradix is also strong but much easier on the gag-from-bad-taste-reflex. It can be found in well stocked herbal and/or supplements shops and well stocked health food stores. The Vitamin Shoppe carries it and tends to have lower prices.


                                    --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Hi, Kerry,
                                    >
                                    > A food which is spectacularly high in iron is dulse, a type of seaweed.
                                    >
                                    > I was once anemic and go over it eating lots of dulse.
                                    >
                                    > Good luck!
                                    >
                                    > Pamela Melcher
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ________________________________
                                    > From: KERRY MATSON <kerrymum@...>
                                    > To: Raw Portland Yahoo Group <rawportland@yahoogroups.com>
                                    > Sent: Thursday, October 1, 2009 12:42:42 AM
                                    > Subject: [RawPortland] low iron
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > hi everyone ... i've been raw for 9 months now. i went to donate blood today & my iron was too low to donate. (when i donated in july, i was just barely high enough to give.) i put lots of spinach in my smoothies and i eat plenty of other leafy greens in my salads, but i'm obviously not getting enough iron. i'd love any input/suggestions you can share with me to get my iron levels up. thanks for your time, kerry
                                    >
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