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Surviving in the Times of Crisis

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  • staroseltseva
    Dear Community Members, I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 1, 2009
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      Dear Community Members,

      I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
      raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
      job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
      anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

      Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
      and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
      Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
      boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
      between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
      the buck?

      Thanks a bunch!
    • Shannon Lundberg
      So far I have found New Seasons to be overall more affordable (and with nicer produce) than whole foods. Fred Meyers has the most affordable OG bananas
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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        So far I have found New Seasons to be overall more affordable (and with nicer produce) than whole foods. Fred Meyers has the most affordable OG bananas (usually 0.79 per lb) And i find to be our local co-op (Alberta, in our case) to have the best produce prices.

        Not quite sure how the subscription farms work during the winter times, and am looking forward to trying them out this growing season. And of course, growing your own food is wonderful and connecting as well.


        good luck and enjoy!



        From: staroseltseva <staroseltseva@...>
        To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, February 1, 2009 11:40:59 PM
        Subject: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis

        Dear Community Members,

        I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
        raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
        job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
        anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

        Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
        and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
        Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
        boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
        between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
        the buck?

        Thanks a bunch!


      • Ericha Clare
        Dear Star turn that frown upside down! that s a start. You can still make mindful choices even in hard times. It may be spendier to be a raw gourmet - all the
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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          Dear Star
          turn that frown upside down! that's a start.
          You can still make mindful choices even in hard times.  It may be spendier to be a raw gourmet - all the nuts and fresh coconut etc.  you might still have them, but less often.  Consider being a raw simpleton instead.
           
          Yes Whole foods can be more expensive than Fred Meyer.  I like the Hollywood Fredmeyer because they have a decent organic section, and usually some good prices - on seasonal stuff anyway.  have found bananas 79/lb, apples and oranges 99-149/lb.  yes good tomatoes are still 3-4/lb, but it's not really their season and maybe i just don't get them.   I also like the co-op for good prices, uglier fruit but tastier!  No place with good food is "cheap", but you can still operate on a budget.
           
          No one is going to judge you (except youself) if you color outside the lines of your raw vegan values.  all of us have made choices for different reasons at different times.  There's no need to go to Mcdonalds or shop exclusively at Winco because of tough times, and i don't hear you saying that. 
           
          Nourishing food may cost more at the checkout (but not in longrun or in big picture), and if you don't have enough money, then do what you can to stick to whole plant based food.  if you are going to have cooked food, for example, go for the beans and rice or millet or quinoa or lentils, that you can get in bulk, rather than bread.  They are less processed and more nourishing. And some of it you can still eat raw if soaked, like lentils or quinoa. or oats, (whole, steel cut, or rolled) are all good, soaked overnight.
           
          Have miso soup - it's alive, full of nutrition, and can be a really filling snack or round out a meal.

          Start sprouting - get some seeds (alfalfa, clover, radish, sunflower, etc.) and grow your nutrition at your kitchen sink.  sprouts are loaded with nutrition, as you may know - if not, read up, it's fascinating!

          Consider the principles of food combining - or not combining, meaning eating more mono-meals - i find i am less hungry if i eat one type of food at a time.  If i graze on lots of foods, i want to keep eating and i want stronger flavors. 
           
          Each of us has various reasons/values that we ascribe to why we eat what we eat.  sometimes in all of our cares for the planet and the animals and other people and our own striving toward perfection, the idea that we need to nourish our body gets lost.  It can really be that simple - what can we eat (that we can afford) that will nourish us, while doing the least harm to us and everyone else etc.  we can find pros and cons to every food if we look close enough. 
           
          And sometimes it turns out that we are hungry for other things, when we really take a look inward- maybe excitement or stimulus because we are bored, love, distraction, whatever - many of us have taken on the habit of eating to fill other voids.  and we can observe, with compassion, that part within ourselves, breathe into it, and maybe brainstorm some other strategies...
           
          Going (or staying) raw/vegan is usually a personal growth/spritual path as much as a menu choice, and as such, there are no mistakes on the path.  Worry and guilt don't help.  Kindness and compassion are key. Just try to do the most good (MO-GO) while still being mindful and grateful. 
           
          Hope that helps,
           
          Ericha Clare
           
          Conscious Eating Coach
          Simply Nourishing
          2428 NE Broadway
          Portland, OR 97232
          (503)331-9999
           


          To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
          From: staroseltseva@...
          Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2009 07:40:59 +0000
          Subject: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis


          Dear Community Members,

          I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
          raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
          job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
          anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

          Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
          and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
          Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
          boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
          between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
          the buck?

          Thanks a bunch!




          Windows Live™ Hotmail®…more than just e-mail. See how it works.
        • Stacey Fassino
          Yes, New Seasons and the local co-ops have beautiful produce for good prices.   And sprouting is always helpful as an fun, inexpensive and highly nutritious
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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            Yes, New Seasons and the local co-ops have beautiful produce for good prices.   And sprouting is always helpful as an fun, inexpensive and highly nutritious living source. 

            It is important that we remain positive and focus on the change that we want to see/create for the future.  Our thoughts create our reality and together we create out future.  A new world is on it's way and it is going to be better than we have ever known.   Sticking to our dreams and values are key, as is keeping positive. 

            Thank You,
            Stacey

            --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Shannon Lundberg <shannacht@...> wrote:
            From: Shannon Lundberg <shannacht@...>
            Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis
            To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 9:24 AM

            So far I have found New Seasons to be overall more affordable (and with nicer produce) than whole foods. Fred Meyers has the most affordable OG bananas (usually 0.79 per lb) And i find to be our local co-op (Alberta, in our case) to have the best produce prices.

            Not quite sure how the subscription farms work during the winter times, and am looking forward to trying them out this growing season. And of course, growing your own food is wonderful and connecting as well.


            good luck and enjoy!



            From: staroseltseva <staroseltseva@ gmail.com>
            To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Sunday, February 1, 2009 11:40:59 PM
            Subject: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis

            Dear Community Members,

            I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
            raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
            job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
            anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

            Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
            and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
            Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
            boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
            between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
            the buck?

            Thanks a bunch!


          • Pamela Melcher
            WILD FOOD USUALLY HAS MORE VITAMINS AND MINERALS, AND LOTS MORE BIOPHOTONS, WHICH ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE ASIMILATE FROM OUR FOOD, THAN ANY OTHER FOOD.
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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              WILD FOOD USUALLY HAS MORE VITAMINS AND MINERALS, AND LOTS MORE BIOPHOTONS, WHICH ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WE ASIMILATE FROM OUR FOOD, THAN ANY OTHER FOOD.
               
              DANDELIONS
              CHICKWEED
              PLANTAIN
              LAMBS QUARTERS.
              NETTLES
              AMARANTH
              CLEAVERS
              WILD LETTUCE
              THISTLES !!!!!!!!!!!! (IN GREEN SMOOTHIES THEY ARE DELICIOUS)
              ETC.

              YOU CAN EVEN EAT GRASS, JUST STRAIN OUT THE FIBER.  OUR DIGESTIVE SYSTEMS CANNOT HANDLE THE FIBER IN GRASS.LAWN GRASS. ANY KIND OF GRASS.

              AND IT IS FREE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              JUST AVOID WHERE IT IS, OR WAS RECENTLY, SPRAYED AND WHERE THE DOGGIES FERTILIZE IT.

              MAYBE SOMEONE WILL PAY YOU TO REMOVE THEM FROM THEIR YARD.

              I LOST A COMMUNITY GARDEN PLOT FOR GROWING WILD FOOD IN THERE.  FLY UNDER THE RADAR THERE IF YOU WANT TO BE SURE TO KEEP YOUR PLOT.

              DR JOHN SWITZER, M.D., A FANTASTICALLY HEALTHY RAW FOODIST WHO SPOKE AT OUR RAW AND LIVING SPIRIT RETREAT LAST YEAR SAID THAT IN GERMANY IN WORLD WAR II WHEN THEY HAD NO FOOD IN THE STORES PEOPLE FORAGED FOR WILD FOOD AND THERE WERE NO NEW INSTANCES OF CANCER, DIABETES,STROKE, HEART DISEASE OR CANCER.

              HIS MOTHER WAS ALIVE IN GERMANY AT THAT TIME.  IT IS THE TRUTH.

              HAPPINESS, HEALTH AND ABUNDANCE FOR ALL!

              PAMELA MELCHER



              --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Ericha Clare <erichabonkers@...> wrote:
              From: Ericha Clare <erichabonkers@...>
              Subject: RE: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis
              To: "Raw Portland" <rawportland@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 11:13 AM

              Dear Star
              turn that frown upside down! that's a start.
              You can still make mindful choices even in hard times.  It may be spendier to be a raw gourmet - all the nuts and fresh coconut etc.  you might still have them, but less often.  Consider being a raw simpleton instead.
               
              Yes Whole foods can be more expensive than Fred Meyer.  I like the Hollywood Fredmeyer because they have a decent organic section, and usually some good prices - on seasonal stuff anyway.  have found bananas 79/lb, apples and oranges 99-149/lb.  yes good tomatoes are still 3-4/lb, but it's not really their season and maybe i just don't get them.   I also like the co-op for good prices, uglier fruit but tastier!  No place with good food is "cheap", but you can still operate on a budget.
               
              No one is going to judge you (except youself) if you color outside the lines of your raw vegan values.  all of us have made choices for different reasons at different times.  There's no need to go to Mcdonalds or shop exclusively at Winco because of tough times, and i don't hear you saying that. 
               
              Nourishing food may cost more at the checkout (but not in longrun or in big picture), and if you don't have enough money, then do what you can to stick to whole plant based food.  if you are going to have cooked food, for example, go for the beans and rice or millet or quinoa or lentils, that you can get in bulk, rather than bread.  They are less processed and more nourishing. And some of it you can still eat raw if soaked, like lentils or quinoa. or oats, (whole, steel cut, or rolled) are all good, soaked overnight.
               
              Have miso soup - it's alive, full of nutrition, and can be a really filling snack or round out a meal.

              Start sprouting - get some seeds (alfalfa, clover, radish, sunflower, etc.) and grow your nutrition at your kitchen sink.  sprouts are loaded with nutrition, as you may know - if not, read up, it's fascinating!

              Consider the principles of food combining - or not combining, meaning eating more mono-meals - i find i am less hungry if i eat one type of food at a time.  If i graze on lots of foods, i want to keep eating and i want stronger flavors. 
               
              Each of us has various reasons/values that we ascribe to why we eat what we eat.  sometimes in all of our cares for the planet and the animals and other people and our own striving toward perfection, the idea that we need to nourish our body gets lost.  It can really be that simple - what can we eat (that we can afford) that will nourish us, while doing the least harm to us and everyone else etc.  we can find pros and cons to every food if we look close enough. 
               
              And sometimes it turns out that we are hungry for other things, when we really take a look inward- maybe excitement or stimulus because we are bored, love, distraction, whatever - many of us have taken on the habit of eating to fill other voids.  and we can observe, with compassion, that part within ourselves, breathe into it, and maybe brainstorm some other strategies.. .
               
              Going (or staying) raw/vegan is usually a personal growth/spritual path as much as a menu choice, and as such, there are no mistakes on the path.  Worry and guilt don't help.  Kindness and compassion are key. Just try to do the most good (MO-GO) while still being mindful and grateful. 
               
              Hope that helps,
               
              Ericha Clare
               
              Conscious Eating Coach
              Simply Nourishing
              2428 NE Broadway
              Portland, OR 97232
              (503)331-9999
               



              To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
              From: staroseltseva@ gmail.com
              Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2009 07:40:59 +0000
              Subject: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis


              Dear Community Members,

              I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
              raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
              job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
              anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

              Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
              and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
              Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
              boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
              between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
              the buck?

              Thanks a bunch!




              Windows Live™ Hotmail®…more than just e-mail. See how it works.

            • Stacey Fassino
              Hi All, I hope that I didn t come across in my reply like Mary Sunshine.   I too, am experiencing financial challenges.  I feel that there is a reason for
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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                Hi All,

                I hope that I didn't come across in my reply like "Mary Sunshine."  I too, am experiencing financial challenges.  I feel that there is a reason for everything and that out of our challenges comes good....and creativity.   It is important for us to continue to simplify our lives, stick together and help one another.  I feel that these things are going to be more commonplace in the future (the new world.)  What is important for us now is to have faith and feel gratitude (for all that we do have.)

                Thank Again.


                Much Love, Joy, & Abundance for All,
                Stacey



                --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Stacey Fassino <sfassino@...> wrote:
                From: Stacey Fassino <sfassino@...>
                Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis
                To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 11:24 AM

                Yes, New Seasons and the local co-ops have beautiful produce for good prices.   And sprouting is always helpful as an fun, inexpensive and highly nutritious living source. 

                It is important that we remain positive and focus on the change that we want to see/create for the future.  Our thoughts create our reality and together we create out future.  A new world is on it's way and it is going to be better than we have ever known.   Sticking to our dreams and values are key, as is keeping positive. 

                Thank You,
                Stacey

                --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Shannon Lundberg <shannacht@yahoo. com> wrote:
                From: Shannon Lundberg <shannacht@yahoo. com>
                Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis
                To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 9:24 AM

                So far I have found New Seasons to be overall more affordable (and with nicer produce) than whole foods. Fred Meyers has the most affordable OG bananas (usually 0.79 per lb) And i find to be our local co-op (Alberta, in our case) to have the best produce prices.

                Not quite sure how the subscription farms work during the winter times, and am looking forward to trying them out this growing season. And of course, growing your own food is wonderful and connecting as well.


                good luck and enjoy!



                From: staroseltseva <staroseltseva@ gmail.com>
                To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Sunday, February 1, 2009 11:40:59 PM
                Subject: [RawPortland] Surviving in the Times of Crisis

                Dear Community Members,

                I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
                raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
                job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
                anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.

                Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
                and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
                Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
                boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
                between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
                the buck?

                Thanks a bunch!


              • brion.oliver
                Of the larger local alternative supermarkets, I recommend New Seasons, even though I no longer work there. Of all of the chains, they are doing the most to
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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                  Of the larger local 'alternative' supermarkets, I recommend New
                  Seasons, even though I no longer work there. Of all of the chains,
                  they are doing the most to support the local farmer and local
                  community, and the money that they make is invested locally in jobs
                  and community endeavors. In supporting local farmers (whether it is a
                  grocery chain or an individual buyer such as ourselves), we are
                  ensuring that our food supplies will remain stronger in times of
                  turmoil, when dependence on products shipped hundreds or thousands of
                  miles can become a very pricey endeavor. Many New Seasons stores have
                  an area for culled product -- produce certainly, but even other
                  expired goods -- for customers and local community members looking for
                  free food. Just ask at the store.

                  I think you will find that New Seasons' prices are, for the most part,
                  cheaper than Whole Foods, especially if you buy with an eye towards
                  weekly specials -- which they advertise both online and in stores.
                  There are other, political, reasons to not support Whole Foods with
                  your all-important dollar, but this isn't the forum for delving
                  further into that conversation.

                  For $30/year. you can become a member/owner at People's Food Co-Op in
                  SE Portland. You can shop there without being a member, but members
                  have the amount of all of their purchases logged and receive member
                  rebates once or twice a year, which is a percentage of individual
                  total purchases. Member/owners also receive community-oriented
                  discounts at other local establishments in Portland, so you can save
                  money other places as well. If you have the time you can be a Hands-On
                  Owner volunteer worker and earn a discount on all shopping of anywhere
                  from 5-15%. 12 hours a month gets you the 15% discount; 8 hours each
                  month gets you the 10%. People's does not stock any commercially grown
                  produce and is a completely vegetarian store -- they have buying
                  practices set by the member/owners that do not allow them to buy any
                  meat (though they do sell eggs and dairy products). Produce prices at
                  People's can sometimes be higher, as they do not have the buying power
                  of other stores, but they also have phenomenal weekly prices (small
                  organic avocados for $.50 each, organic apples for $.99/lb, etc.) and
                  a discounted bin of overly ripe produce that is $.59/lb (the best
                  times to get culled produce is in the morning, probably 8-10am).Their
                  prices on non-produce items are cheaper than other natural foods
                  stores in the city, pretty much across the board -- this is because
                  the Co-Op isn't out to make profits, but to support their community
                  and the member/owners. Their bulk section is quite well-priced with
                  clearly labeled raw and sproutable items, and they have the largest
                  and cheapest selection of bulk organic raw nuts in town. People's also
                  has a free box of expired food.

                  The year-round Farmer's Market outside of People's is on Wednesdays
                  from 2pm - 7pm, and features only local farmers selling local goods.
                  Farmer's Market prices in Portland tend to be higher than in other
                  states, but if you develop a relationship with the farmers, you can
                  often get special pricing; some may even do barter/exchange. You can
                  also time your purchases towards the close of the market, when many
                  farmers will agree to sell their remaining product for lower prices
                  they they asked earlier in the day. There are one or two other
                  year-round Markets in Portland, and the full season will start again soon.

                  Uncle Paul's Produce Market (http://www.unclepaulsproduce.com/) is on
                  SE Hawthorne at 23rd, and features very low produce prices on
                  primarily commercial produce. Uncle Paul stocks second-tier produce
                  that other stores won't take, so the produce may not last as long in
                  your frig or may have more blemishes than what you would find at NSM,
                  Whole Foods, or Fred Meyer's, but it is a lot cheaper. His organic
                  selection varies day-to-day.

                  I'm not as familiar with Alberta Food Co-Op and Food Front, but both
                  are local, community-oriented co-ops that may have discount plans for
                  member/owners, and most likely have free boxes. Alberta is on NE
                  Alberta around 15th; Food Front is in NW Portland near 23rd and Vaughn.

                  Asian markets are an option for cheap produce and seaweed, but you'd
                  have to be willing to give up organics. Fubonn, on 82nd near SE
                  Powell, is th eone I am most aware of.

                  With regards to organic produce, it may be worth researching which
                  vegetables and fruits are least inclined to absorb chemicals from
                  commercial farming practices. Some fruits and vegetable will have a
                  higher toxicity than others, and you may be able to buy some
                  commercial produce without overly compromising your values, at least
                  with regards to your personal health.

                  There are also some local folks in the raw community endeavoring to
                  provide us with access to high-quality raw foods at better prices.
                  Ericha Clare, who responded earlier, is one; she has a boutique in NE
                  Portland. I'm another; I sell high-quality superfoods for super-cheap,
                  though my distributor recently raised my prices due to my low sales
                  volume so I've had to raise prices a bit. I've got raw nori sheets (50
                  for $18), cacao, and the like. Nora Lenz supplies raw produce and nuts
                  in bulk quantities, and advertises her availability here on the
                  RawPortland list; her website is http://www.rawtreasure.com/, though
                  the website doesn't list her seasonal produce picks.

                  I'll echo others' comments on sprouting. I purchased a lovely tiered
                  green plastic sprouting tray at Mirador for $35 (before a 5% discount
                  for being a People's Food Co-Op member) and have sprouting steadily
                  for almost two months now. It's extremely cheap, it's easy, and it's
                  completely alive!

                  Oh... here's another trick you can do -- you can buy produce in bulk
                  from New Seasons Market for only a 25% markup. You'd have to go in
                  with others (a case of anything is hard to eat on your own without
                  spoilage), but produce tends to have a high retail markup because of
                  spoilage. When I was doing this in the fall, I was getting cases of
                  organic kale for $1.50/head (vs. $2.29) and organic avocados for
                  something like $1.75 each (versus $2.50). Then again, avocados are on
                  sale right now for either $1.50 or $1.95 each at NSM, and kale was
                  recently $1.50/head, retail.

                  I live in a neighborhood with a couple of different markets, and I
                  shop at many of them throughout the week, which allows me to compare
                  and contrast prices on specific items, ensuring that I get the best
                  pricing possible. I don't shop at the large chains for political
                  reasons, but one additional advantage of this is that the local stores
                  often have extraordinary customer service that can often save me
                  money. New Seasons, for instance, will refund you the price of an
                  avocado that was spoiled when you took it home, and they will accept
                  other forms of return without hassle.

                  Good luck!

                  -Brion

                  --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, "staroseltseva"
                  <staroseltseva@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Community Members,
                  >
                  > I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
                  > raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
                  > job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
                  > anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.
                  >
                  > Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
                  > and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
                  > Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
                  > boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
                  > between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
                  > the buck?
                  >
                  > Thanks a bunch!
                  >
                • Ekaterina Staroseltseva
                  Greetings, All! Thanks a lot for your contribution and support! I will definitely try to apply your advice in my journey. It s extremely uplifting to realize
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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                    Greetings, All!

                    Thanks a lot for your contribution and support! 
                    I will definitely try to apply your advice in my journey. 
                    It's extremely uplifting to realize that you are not alone in this endeavor. 
                    Special thanks to Brion for the very thorough and helpful information. 
                    This challenge is turning into a great learning experience! Thank you!

                    On Mon, Feb 2, 2009 at 7:01 PM, brion.oliver <brion@...> wrote:

                    Of the larger local 'alternative' supermarkets, I recommend New
                    Seasons, even though I no longer work there. Of all of the chains,
                    they are doing the most to support the local farmer and local
                    community, and the money that they make is invested locally in jobs
                    and community endeavors. In supporting local farmers (whether it is a
                    grocery chain or an individual buyer such as ourselves), we are
                    ensuring that our food supplies will remain stronger in times of
                    turmoil, when dependence on products shipped hundreds or thousands of
                    miles can become a very pricey endeavor. Many New Seasons stores have
                    an area for culled product -- produce certainly, but even other
                    expired goods -- for customers and local community members looking for
                    free food. Just ask at the store.

                    I think you will find that New Seasons' prices are, for the most part,
                    cheaper than Whole Foods, especially if you buy with an eye towards
                    weekly specials -- which they advertise both online and in stores.
                    There are other, political, reasons to not support Whole Foods with
                    your all-important dollar, but this isn't the forum for delving
                    further into that conversation.

                    For $30/year. you can become a member/owner at People's Food Co-Op in
                    SE Portland. You can shop there without being a member, but members
                    have the amount of all of their purchases logged and receive member
                    rebates once or twice a year, which is a percentage of individual
                    total purchases. Member/owners also receive community-oriented
                    discounts at other local establishments in Portland, so you can save
                    money other places as well. If you have the time you can be a Hands-On
                    Owner volunteer worker and earn a discount on all shopping of anywhere
                    from 5-15%. 12 hours a month gets you the 15% discount; 8 hours each
                    month gets you the 10%. People's does not stock any commercially grown
                    produce and is a completely vegetarian store -- they have buying
                    practices set by the member/owners that do not allow them to buy any
                    meat (though they do sell eggs and dairy products). Produce prices at
                    People's can sometimes be higher, as they do not have the buying power
                    of other stores, but they also have phenomenal weekly prices (small
                    organic avocados for $.50 each, organic apples for $.99/lb, etc.) and
                    a discounted bin of overly ripe produce that is $.59/lb (the best
                    times to get culled produce is in the morning, probably 8-10am).Their
                    prices on non-produce items are cheaper than other natural foods
                    stores in the city, pretty much across the board -- this is because
                    the Co-Op isn't out to make profits, but to support their community
                    and the member/owners. Their bulk section is quite well-priced with
                    clearly labeled raw and sproutable items, and they have the largest
                    and cheapest selection of bulk organic raw nuts in town. People's also
                    has a free box of expired food.

                    The year-round Farmer's Market outside of People's is on Wednesdays
                    from 2pm - 7pm, and features only local farmers selling local goods.
                    Farmer's Market prices in Portland tend to be higher than in other
                    states, but if you develop a relationship with the farmers, you can
                    often get special pricing; some may even do barter/exchange. You can
                    also time your purchases towards the close of the market, when many
                    farmers will agree to sell their remaining product for lower prices
                    they they asked earlier in the day. There are one or two other
                    year-round Markets in Portland, and the full season will start again soon.

                    Uncle Paul's Produce Market (http://www.unclepaulsproduce.com/) is on
                    SE Hawthorne at 23rd, and features very low produce prices on
                    primarily commercial produce. Uncle Paul stocks second-tier produce
                    that other stores won't take, so the produce may not last as long in
                    your frig or may have more blemishes than what you would find at NSM,
                    Whole Foods, or Fred Meyer's, but it is a lot cheaper. His organic
                    selection varies day-to-day.

                    I'm not as familiar with Alberta Food Co-Op and Food Front, but both
                    are local, community-oriented co-ops that may have discount plans for
                    member/owners, and most likely have free boxes. Alberta is on NE
                    Alberta around 15th; Food Front is in NW Portland near 23rd and Vaughn.

                    Asian markets are an option for cheap produce and seaweed, but you'd
                    have to be willing to give up organics. Fubonn, on 82nd near SE
                    Powell, is th eone I am most aware of.

                    With regards to organic produce, it may be worth researching which
                    vegetables and fruits are least inclined to absorb chemicals from
                    commercial farming practices. Some fruits and vegetable will have a
                    higher toxicity than others, and you may be able to buy some
                    commercial produce without overly compromising your values, at least
                    with regards to your personal health.

                    There are also some local folks in the raw community endeavoring to
                    provide us with access to high-quality raw foods at better prices.
                    Ericha Clare, who responded earlier, is one; she has a boutique in NE
                    Portland. I'm another; I sell high-quality superfoods for super-cheap,
                    though my distributor recently raised my prices due to my low sales
                    volume so I've had to raise prices a bit. I've got raw nori sheets (50
                    for $18), cacao, and the like. Nora Lenz supplies raw produce and nuts
                    in bulk quantities, and advertises her availability here on the
                    RawPortland list; her website is http://www.rawtreasure.com/, though
                    the website doesn't list her seasonal produce picks.

                    I'll echo others' comments on sprouting. I purchased a lovely tiered
                    green plastic sprouting tray at Mirador for $35 (before a 5% discount
                    for being a People's Food Co-Op member) and have sprouting steadily
                    for almost two months now. It's extremely cheap, it's easy, and it's
                    completely alive!

                    Oh... here's another trick you can do -- you can buy produce in bulk
                    from New Seasons Market for only a 25% markup. You'd have to go in
                    with others (a case of anything is hard to eat on your own without
                    spoilage), but produce tends to have a high retail markup because of
                    spoilage. When I was doing this in the fall, I was getting cases of
                    organic kale for $1.50/head (vs. $2.29) and organic avocados for
                    something like $1.75 each (versus $2.50). Then again, avocados are on
                    sale right now for either $1.50 or $1.95 each at NSM, and kale was
                    recently $1.50/head, retail.

                    I live in a neighborhood with a couple of different markets, and I
                    shop at many of them throughout the week, which allows me to compare
                    and contrast prices on specific items, ensuring that I get the best
                    pricing possible. I don't shop at the large chains for political
                    reasons, but one additional advantage of this is that the local stores
                    often have extraordinary customer service that can often save me
                    money. New Seasons, for instance, will refund you the price of an
                    avocado that was spoiled when you took it home, and they will accept
                    other forms of return without hassle.

                    Good luck!

                    -Brion

                    --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, "staroseltseva"


                    <staroseltseva@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Community Members,
                    >
                    > I am sitting here thinking about how am I going to stay devoted to my
                    > raw vegan values during these hard times. The combination of low-paid
                    > job, need to continue my studies, instability, and fear doesn't leave
                    > anything else to do but starve, in order to pursue my dreams.
                    >
                    > Anyways, I was wandering if you guys have any advice on how to eat raw
                    > and organic on tight budget. I used to buy everything from Whole
                    > Foods, but I suspect it's not the cheapest way to go. Anyone ordered
                    > boxed produce directly from farmers? Anyone made a price comparison
                    > between, say, Whole Foods and Fred Meyer? What are you doing to save
                    > the buck?
                    >
                    > Thanks a bunch!
                    >




                    --
                    (503)747-9582
                  • Elizabeth
                    I m new to this group and new to the Raw lifestyle.  I m already feeling much better physically and mentally.  Thank you for the informative posts.    Are
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 3, 2009
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                      I'm new to this group and new to the Raw lifestyle.  I'm already feeling much better physically and mentally.  Thank you for the informative posts. 
                       
                      Are there any local Raw cooking prep/education classes?
                       
                      Thank You!
                       
                      ~Elizabeth 
                       

                       

                    • Gabrielle
                      Welcome, Elizabeth, and all newcomers! My spiritual community, Christ the Healer UCC, sponsors the annual Raw and Living Spirit Retreat
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 3, 2009
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                        Welcome, Elizabeth, and all newcomers! My spiritual community, Christ
                        the Healer UCC, sponsors the annual Raw and Living Spirit Retreat
                        (www.rawandlivingspirit.org), occasional raw events, and a weekly raw
                        food prep class before our Sunday Supper gathering each week at Kairos
                        UCC, 4790 SE Logus Rd., Milwaukie. We meet in the church kitchen from
                        4:30-5:30 to help the weekly chef finish a 3 course menu that varies
                        each time, so you can have hands on experience of many dishes if you
                        become a regular. For table conversation, we share our personal
                        experiences in response to a weekly theme. After dinner, those who wish
                        are welcome to go deeper into the theme with a story-discussion, closing
                        prayer circle and raw communion.
                        This Sunday Tashi Rana is our chef, making two Thai dishes--Coconut
                        Curry Soup and Raw Pad Thai--to accompany green smoothies and cookies
                        for dessert. Donation for the class and dinner is only $10-$20, sliding
                        scale. Please RSVP if you possibly can by reply email or a message at
                        503-650-4447 so we can plan accordingly.
                        Love,
                        Gabrielle Chavez


                        Elizabeth wrote:
                        >
                        > I'm new to this group and new to the Raw lifestyle. I'm already
                        > feeling much better physically and mentally. Thank you for the
                        > informative posts.
                        >
                        > Are there any local Raw cooking prep/education classes?
                        >
                        > Thank You!
                        >
                        > ~Elizabeth
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > __________ NOD32 3704 (20081218) Information __________
                        >
                        > This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
                        > http://www.eset.com
                        >
                        >
                        > __________ NOD32 3704 (20081218) Information __________
                        >
                        > This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
                        > http://www.eset.com
                      • brion.oliver
                        Elizabeth -- Welcome! Congratulations on enjoying improved health! You might find Oregon Raw Resource to be a helpful website for you as you venture into the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 3, 2009
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                          Elizabeth --

                          Welcome! Congratulations on enjoying improved health!

                          You might find Oregon Raw Resource to be a helpful website for you as
                          you venture into the raw foods community. It has a listing of local
                          classes, groups, restaurants, and special events, and you can elect to
                          join the mailing list to receive announcements when the list is
                          updated with new events or other entries. http://OregonRawResource.org/

                          There are a number of active groups in town through which you can get
                          access to much information and community support.

                          Be well!

                          -Brion

                          --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, Elizabeth <whitewater20060303@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > I'm new to this group and new to the Raw lifestyle.  I'm already
                          feeling much better physically and mentally.  Thank you for the
                          informative posts. 
                          >  
                          > Are there any local Raw cooking prep/education classes?
                          >  
                          > Thank You!
                          >  
                          > ~Elizabeth 
                          >  
                          >
                          >  
                          >
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