Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Newbie introduction

Expand Messages
  • Heidi Strauch
    I m glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by any means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that most people eat (fruit
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 19, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by any
      means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that most
      people eat (fruit and veggies) I had not experienced raw food until I
      ate at Cafe Gratitude in Berkeley this summer. My daughter is celiac
      and we went there because it is gluten-free. I realized as I looked
      at the menu that it was raw as well. The food was out-of-this world
      fabulous. Although I was open, I did not expect it to be so
      delicious. I bought their recipe book and everything in it has turned
      out great on my first try. Am itching to get a food dehydrater, but
      our condo kitchen is small.

      Anyway in a nutshell: my husband has Type I Diabetes (but is extremely
      healthy) and vegan (cheats on the eggs sometimes), gluten-free,
      soy-free, yeast-free, sucrose-free. My daughter (almost 6) is
      gluten-intolerant and sensitive to dairy, soy, & walnuts. I am
      sensitive to dairy, soy, most oils. Yikes. So far we aren't aware of
      any sensitivities in our twin boys (almost 3). We eat yummy food but
      it is expensive.

      Question: does anyone know of a good substitute for lecithin or miso?
      It's out for most of my family and is a key ingredient in many of the
      raw foods recipes I've seen.

      I look forward to learning from all of you.

      Heidi.
    • Cori Barth
      Hi- wow, you guys have some challenges!  Maybe research red miso as a sub for white miso- it s barley.  I assume you re trying to avoid the soy?  I can t
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 20, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi- wow, you guys have some challenges!  Maybe research red miso as a sub for white miso- it's barley.  I assume you're trying to avoid the soy?  I can't really be sure this would work for you, but I do know that red miso is stronger than white, so you should use less of it than you would white miso.  If you live in Portland, have you been to the Blossoming Lotus?  They have lotsa glutenless and raw foods- super yummy.  Happy fooding!

        --- On Wed, 11/19/08, Heidi Strauch <heidistrauch@...> wrote:
        From: Heidi Strauch <heidistrauch@...>
        Subject: [RawPortland] Newbie introduction
        To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 10:27 PM

        I'm glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by any
        means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that most
        people eat (fruit and veggies) I had not experienced raw food until I
        ate at Cafe Gratitude in Berkeley this summer. My daughter is celiac
        and we went there because it is gluten-free. I realized as I looked
        at the menu that it was raw as well. The food was out-of-this world
        fabulous. Although I was open, I did not expect it to be so
        delicious. I bought their recipe book and everything in it has turned
        out great on my first try. Am itching to get a food dehydrater, but
        our condo kitchen is small.

        Anyway in a nutshell: my husband has Type I Diabetes (but is extremely
        healthy) and vegan (cheats on the eggs sometimes), gluten-free,
        soy-free, yeast-free, sucrose-free. My daughter (almost 6) is
        gluten-intolerant and sensitive to dairy, soy, & walnuts. I am
        sensitive to dairy, soy, most oils. Yikes. So far we aren't aware of
        any sensitivities in our twin boys (almost 3). We eat yummy food but
        it is expensive.

        Question: does anyone know of a good substitute for lecithin or miso?
        It's out for most of my family and is a key ingredient in many of the
        raw foods recipes I've seen.

        I look forward to learning from all of you.

        Heidi.


      • victorianova
        Hi Heidi: I ve found that many recipes that call for miso do just fine without it. Taste it and if you think it needs some salt just try a little Celtic salt
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 20, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Heidi: I've found that many recipes that call for miso do just
          fine without it. Taste it and if you think it needs some salt just
          try a little Celtic salt or RealSalt (brand.) Re: gluten
          intolerance: Make sure to avoid nama shoyu(contains roasted wheat),
          kamut crackers and all misos from Japan due to barley flour thrown
          on the fermenting koji. I hope you and your husband have been
          tested for celiac disease. Helen

          (100% raw foods since 1999, cured my breast cancer and everything
          else in 1999 with raw foods and in perfect health still today!) Eat
          RAW!

          http://www.RecipesRaw.com

          --- In RawPortland@yahoogroups.com, "Heidi Strauch"
          <heidistrauch@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by
          any
          > means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that
          most
          > people eat (fruit and veggies) I had not experienced raw food
          until I
          > ate at Cafe Gratitude in Berkeley this summer. My daughter is
          celiac
          > and we went there because it is gluten-free. I realized as I
          looked
          > at the menu that it was raw as well. The food was out-of-this
          world
          > fabulous. Although I was open, I did not expect it to be so
          > delicious. I bought their recipe book and everything in it has
          turned
          > out great on my first try. Am itching to get a food dehydrater,
          but
          > our condo kitchen is small.
          >
          > Anyway in a nutshell: my husband has Type I Diabetes (but is
          extremely
          > healthy) and vegan (cheats on the eggs sometimes), gluten-free,
          > soy-free, yeast-free, sucrose-free. My daughter (almost 6) is
          > gluten-intolerant and sensitive to dairy, soy, & walnuts. I am
          > sensitive to dairy, soy, most oils. Yikes. So far we aren't
          aware of
          > any sensitivities in our twin boys (almost 3). We eat yummy food
          but
          > it is expensive.
          >
          > Question: does anyone know of a good substitute for lecithin or
          miso?
          > It's out for most of my family and is a key ingredient in many of
          the
          > raw foods recipes I've seen.
          >
          > I look forward to learning from all of you.
          >
          > Heidi.
          >
        • Marcus
          Hi there Heidi, I think you ll find people of varying degrees of raw in this group. If your listening to your body and giving it what it needs then you can do
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 20, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi there Heidi, I think you'll find people of varying degrees of raw in this group. If your listening to your body and giving it what it needs then you can do no wrong!

            Me personally I've maintained about a 80/20 ratio of Living/Cooked for several years. It all comes down to doing what is right for you and your body. Especially during transition If your body is craving something that might not be 100% living, it's a better bet to give your body what it's asking for. I recommend anyone wanting to go 100% living to make sure they have all there ducks in a row and get your blood checked out, also be prepared to take super-foods to supplement your body and get blood-work done regularly. I've known people in the last few years that ended up in the emergency room because they were not keeping tabs on their bodies needs and ended up being deficient in some way. For me I am not into giving blood so I eat a few things off the Living Foods category that keep my body happy and in good health. Bottom line is give your body what it's asking for. Otherwise putting eating regime or idealism ahead of your bodies needs is can result in some unpleasant consequences. 

             You will find some people find labels and status such as 100% or "vegan" or whatever very important to them and, some can be very uncomfortable with others who do things differently. It's up to each of us to develop a 2 way communication with our bodies so we can act and react in accordance to our bodies needs. This is much easier when you go inside and listen to yourself instead of listening to what others are doing or, say you should be doing. In the end all our bodies are unique and only we can judge for ourselves what is right or wrong for us. 

            I always liked what Paul Nison told me once: He said that he doesn't think the focus should be on whether your eating raw living foods or not. The focus should be on giving your body what it's asking for and, make the food you give your body, cooked or not, the very best you can afford. 

            Follow these simple rules of co-creation with your body and you should do great! 

            M



            On Nov 19, 2008, at 10:27 PM, Heidi Strauch wrote:

            I'm glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by any
            means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that most
            people eat (fruit and veggies) I had not experienced raw food until I
            ate at Cafe Gratitude in Berkeley this summer. My daughter is celiac
            and we went there because it is gluten-free. I realized as I looked
            at the menu that it was raw as well. The food was out-of-this world
            fabulous. Although I was open, I did not expect it to be so
            delicious. I bought their recipe book and everything in it has turned
            out great on my first try. Am itching to get a food dehydrater, but
            our condo kitchen is small.

            Anyway in a nutshell: my husband has Type I Diabetes (but is extremely
            healthy) and vegan (cheats on the eggs sometimes), gluten-free,
            soy-free, yeast-free, sucrose-free. My daughter (almost 6) is
            gluten-intolerant and sensitive to dairy, soy, & walnuts. I am
            sensitive to dairy, soy, most oils. Yikes. So far we aren't aware of
            any sensitivities in our twin boys (almost 3). We eat yummy food but
            it is expensive.

            Question: does anyone know of a good substitute for lecithin or miso?
            It's out for most of my family and is a key ingredient in many of the
            raw foods recipes I've seen.

            I look forward to learning from all of you.

            Heidi.





          • Stacey Fassino
            Hi Heidi, Are you familiar with South River Miso Company?  They make an Azuki Bean Miso, that is soy and gluten free.  Their misos are so wonderful and come
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 20, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Heidi,

              Are you familiar with South River Miso Company?  They make an Azuki Bean Miso, that is soy and gluten free.  Their misos are so wonderful and come in glass jars.  Here is a link for the Azuki Bean: http://www.southrivermiso.com/store/p/3-Azuki-Bean-Miso.html. Although it is available through the website only during certain times of the year, stores seem to carry it year round.  I know that Alberta Co-op has it.

              Best Wishes,
              Stacey


              --- On Wed, 11/19/08, Heidi Strauch <heidistrauch@...> wrote:
              From: Heidi Strauch <heidistrauch@...>
              Subject: [RawPortland] Newbie introduction
              To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 10:27 PM

              I'm glad to have found this group. We are not completely raw, by any
              means, but experimenting. Other than the standard raw foods that most
              people eat (fruit and veggies) I had not experienced raw food until I
              ate at Cafe Gratitude in Berkeley this summer. My daughter is celiac
              and we went there because it is gluten-free. I realized as I looked
              at the menu that it was raw as well. The food was out-of-this world
              fabulous. Although I was open, I did not expect it to be so
              delicious. I bought their recipe book and everything in it has turned
              out great on my first try. Am itching to get a food dehydrater, but
              our condo kitchen is small.

              Anyway in a nutshell: my husband has Type I Diabetes (but is extremely
              healthy) and vegan (cheats on the eggs sometimes), gluten-free,
              soy-free, yeast-free, sucrose-free. My daughter (almost 6) is
              gluten-intolerant and sensitive to dairy, soy, & walnuts. I am
              sensitive to dairy, soy, most oils. Yikes. So far we aren't aware of
              any sensitivities in our twin boys (almost 3). We eat yummy food but
              it is expensive.

              Question: does anyone know of a good substitute for lecithin or miso?
              It's out for most of my family and is a key ingredient in many of the
              raw foods recipes I've seen.

              I look forward to learning from all of you.

              Heidi.

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.