Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Cashews

Expand Messages
  • Annalise Jones
    Try substituting brazil nuts for those recipes with cashews - they are in the recipe because they are creamy, and brazil nuts are also great for that. What you
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 20, 2007
      Try substituting brazil nuts for those recipes with cashews - they are in the recipe because they are creamy, and brazil nuts are also great for that.
       
      What you said is so profound - that as the meal planner/preparer, it's in your hands whether or not your family eats raw. I am also a homemaker, but I have found for me, right now, I can't try to control my husband's diet. It's too much of a burden on me. He will join me when he cares. (If I made raw for him, he would nibble at it and then cook his own food anyway. And his raw preferences are completely different from mine, so I wouldn't be eating the way I like to either.)  I hope eventually we'll have a raw family where we just eat what we feel like, without making big recipes or lots of shopping trips. Like right now, I don't really do meals or make recipes. I just eat fruit, goat's milk, veggie juice, etc. snacking all day.
    • Mike Snyder
      Hi Elizabeth, There is no need to worry about the quality of nuts and seeds here in Portland. We have the best in the world! All the Portland area natural food
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 19, 2009
        Hi Elizabeth,

        There is no need to worry about the quality of nuts and seeds here in Portland. We have the best in the world!

        All the Portland area natural food stores and co-ops, including People's, Food Front, Alberta Co-op, Whole Foods, New Seasons, etc... have high quality, raw, organic nuts and seeds.

        The article about "most cashews labeled raw aren't really" is referring to the cashews sold at supermarkets like Safeway. I don't purchase nuts and seeds from Safeway.

        Also, Trader Joe's is another store that has raw nuts and seeds which may or may not be raw. I occasionally purchase their raw pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds.

        If you are going to store macadamia nuts for a long time, it is better to purchase them in the shell, but you need a heavy duty nut cracker. I think Mirador has them.

        Because Macs are real expensive, I purchase them out of the shell, only a small quantity at a time required for the specific recipe, and I don't store them.

        I hope this helps! Take care,

        Mike


        From: Elizabeth <whitewater20060303@...>
        To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2009 9:55:45 AM
        Subject: [RawPortland] Cashews

        Me again with another question as I continue to educate myself on the raw lifestyle.
         
        I have just read that most cashews labeled raw aren't really.  They are steamed to remove them from their shells and also to remove the oil that is found on the inside of the shells that is toxic to humans. 
         
        Is there are good way to find out how nuts are processed?  Is there a local resource, instead of ordering from the web.
         
        and speaking of nuts...macadamia' s.  I've also read they should only be purchased in the shell because out of them they go rancid quickly.
         
        How do you tell if a nut has gone rancid?  Does it have a weird smell?
         
        Lots of questions... I'm beginning to feel bogged down in the details and frustrated that things labeled one way really aren't.
         
        Elizabeth

         

      • Lizz bommarito
        Actually all cashews are heat treated even if labeled raw even the really really raw ones must be otherwise they would burn your mouth. I have heard of
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 19, 2009
          Actually all cashews are heat treated even if labeled "raw" even the really really raw ones must be otherwise they would burn your mouth. I have heard of "really raw" companies getting their cashews from Indonesian producers that shell the cashew nut from the fruit with a machete but this still is not logical since the fact remains that cashews are toxic and burn your mouth terrible in their natural form (trust me I've tried) The cashew tree fruit on the other hand in delicious and nutritious. Indigenous people eat the fruit and then plant the nut to get more trees for fruit. That being said what we eat once in awhile has negligible effects on our overall health as long as our daily habits are good. So eating small amounts of cashews on an infrequent basis regardless of whether or not they are truly raw is irrelevant. I strongly urge you if your are just getting into the raw lifestyle to treat the recipes that call for lots of nuts (as well as salt, refined sugars like agave and honey, spices etc.) as transitional recipes to help you let go of cooked food. I suggest that you do not treat the recipes in gourmet raw cookbooks as the end all be all of a healthy diet, but as a step on the path to a simple raw diet of abundant fruits and vegetables with small amounts or quality plant fat. Be well! and have a fruitful day!
          Lizz 

          --- On Thu, 2/19/09, Mike Snyder <mike@...> wrote:
          From: Mike Snyder <mike@...>
          Subject: [RawPortland] Re: Cashews
          To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, February 19, 2009, 11:45 AM

          Hi Elizabeth,

          There is no need to worry about the quality of nuts and seeds here in Portland. We have the best in the world!

          All the Portland area natural food stores and co-ops, including People's, Food Front, Alberta Co-op, Whole Foods, New Seasons, etc... have high quality, raw, organic nuts and seeds.

          The article about "most cashews labeled raw aren't really" is referring to the cashews sold at supermarkets like Safeway. I don't purchase nuts and seeds from Safeway.

          Also, Trader Joe's is another store that has raw nuts and seeds which may or may not be raw. I occasionally purchase their raw pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds.

          If you are going to store macadamia nuts for a long time, it is better to purchase them in the shell, but you need a heavy duty nut cracker. I think Mirador has them.

          Because Macs are real expensive, I purchase them out of the shell, only a small quantity at a time required for the specific recipe, and I don't store them.

          I hope this helps! Take care,

          Mike


          From: Elizabeth <whitewater20060303@ yahoo.com>
          To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2009 9:55:45 AM
          Subject: [RawPortland] Cashews

          Me again with another question as I continue to educate myself on the raw lifestyle.
           
          I have just read that most cashews labeled raw aren't really.  They are steamed to remove them from their shells and also to remove the oil that is found on the inside of the shells that is toxic to humans. 
           
          Is there are good way to find out how nuts are processed?  Is there a local resource, instead of ordering from the web.
           
          and speaking of nuts...macadamia' s.  I've also read they should only be purchased in the shell because out of them they go rancid quickly.
           
          How do you tell if a nut has gone rancid?  Does it have a weird smell?
           
          Lots of questions... I'm beginning to feel bogged down in the details and frustrated that things labeled one way really aren't.
           
          Elizabeth

           


        • Stacey Fassino
          Also, according to Gabriel Cousens, cashews have a notably high fungal and mycotoxin count.  Mycotoxins are compounds that are produced by molds; they are
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 19, 2009
            Also, according to Gabriel Cousens, cashews have a notably high fungal and mycotoxin count.  Mycotoxins are compounds that are produced by molds; they are disruptive to our bodies.  

            http://books.google.com/books?id=7NQYFlwT56QC&pg=PA25&lpg=PA25&dq=cashews+mycotoxic&source=web&ots=aTRGo9ue_x&sig=TkHpnJi2fuQkrDq6hIX3sGJMJiI

            --- On Thu, 2/19/09, Lizz bommarito <circleakitchen@...> wrote:
            From: Lizz bommarito <circleakitchen@...>
            Subject: Re: [RawPortland] Re: Cashews
            To: RawPortland@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, February 19, 2009, 2:23 PM

            Actually all cashews are heat treated even if labeled "raw" even the really really raw ones must be otherwise they would burn your mouth. I have heard of "really raw" companies getting their cashews from Indonesian producers that shell the cashew nut from the fruit with a machete but this still is not logical since the fact remains that cashews are toxic and burn your mouth terrible in their natural form (trust me I've tried) The cashew tree fruit on the other hand in delicious and nutritious. Indigenous people eat the fruit and then plant the nut to get more trees for fruit. That being said what we eat once in awhile has negligible effects on our overall health as long as our daily habits are good. So eating small amounts of cashews on an infrequent basis regardless of whether or not they are truly raw is irrelevant. I strongly urge you if your are just getting into the raw lifestyle to treat the recipes that call for lots of nuts (as well as salt, refined sugars like agave and honey, spices etc.) as transitional recipes to help you let go of cooked food. I suggest that you do not treat the recipes in gourmet raw cookbooks as the end all be all of a healthy diet, but as a step on the path to a simple raw diet of abundant fruits and vegetables with small amounts or quality plant fat. Be well! and have a fruitful day!
            Lizz 

            --- On Thu, 2/19/09, Mike Snyder <mike@therawdiet. com> wrote:
            From: Mike Snyder <mike@therawdiet. com>
            Subject: [RawPortland] Re: Cashews
            To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Thursday, February 19, 2009, 11:45 AM

            Hi Elizabeth,

            There is no need to worry about the quality of nuts and seeds here in Portland. We have the best in the world!

            All the Portland area natural food stores and co-ops, including People's, Food Front, Alberta Co-op, Whole Foods, New Seasons, etc... have high quality, raw, organic nuts and seeds.

            The article about "most cashews labeled raw aren't really" is referring to the cashews sold at supermarkets like Safeway. I don't purchase nuts and seeds from Safeway.

            Also, Trader Joe's is another store that has raw nuts and seeds which may or may not be raw. I occasionally purchase their raw pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds.

            If you are going to store macadamia nuts for a long time, it is better to purchase them in the shell, but you need a heavy duty nut cracker. I think Mirador has them.

            Because Macs are real expensive, I purchase them out of the shell, only a small quantity at a time required for the specific recipe, and I don't store them.

            I hope this helps! Take care,

            Mike


            From: Elizabeth <whitewater20060303@ yahoo.com>
            To: RawPortland@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2009 9:55:45 AM
            Subject: [RawPortland] Cashews

            Me again with another question as I continue to educate myself on the raw lifestyle.
             
            I have just read that most cashews labeled raw aren't really.  They are steamed to remove them from their shells and also to remove the oil that is found on the inside of the shells that is toxic to humans. 
             
            Is there are good way to find out how nuts are processed?  Is there a local resource, instead of ordering from the web.
             
            and speaking of nuts...macadamia' s.  I've also read they should only be purchased in the shell because out of them they go rancid quickly.
             
            How do you tell if a nut has gone rancid?  Does it have a weird smell?
             
            Lots of questions... I'm beginning to feel bogged down in the details and frustrated that things labeled one way really aren't.
             
            Elizabeth

             


          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.