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Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

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  • David R. Hassall
    Dear John, I know you re the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of the PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
      Dear John,

      I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
      the
      PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
      feeling
      from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
      keyboard
      to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
      activity
      has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
      be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

      Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

      expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
      they
      are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
      even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
      disappeared
      as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

      I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
      Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
      experimentation
      using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
      others
      don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
      that
      will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

      and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
      really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
      for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
      adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

      Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
      software
      writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

      Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
      and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
      existing
      packet networks here in New Mexico. I am still running an old and tired MFJ
      1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
      packet
      racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

      a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

      73 Dave
      David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
      WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/
    • John Wiseman
      Dave, If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the Keyboard to Keyboard Connections section of the TNCPI manual
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014

        Dave,

        If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the " Keyboard to Keyboard Connections" section of the TNCPI manual for instructions on setting it up.

        If you want others to be able to connect to you things are a little more complicated. BPQ isn't a BBS program, it is a Node with optional BBS and Chat server programs, and can be configured to allow you to make terminal-terminal calls, and others to connect to you.

        73,

        John

         

         


        From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David R. Hassall
        Sent: 12 February 2014 14:40
        To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

         

         

        Dear John,

        I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
        the
        PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
        feeling
        from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
        keyboard
        to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
        activity
        has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
        be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

        Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

        expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
        they
        are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
        even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
        disappeared
        as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

        I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
        Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
        experimentation
        using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
        others
        don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
        that
        will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

        and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
        really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
        for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
        adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

        Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
        software
        writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

        Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
        and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
        existing
        packet networks here in New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
        1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
        packet
        racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

        a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

        73 Dave
        David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
        WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/

      • Tadd Torborg
        Dave, I have been looking into the lack of infrastructure and activity on terrestrial VHF/UHF packet radio, especially keyboarding, here in North Carolina.
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
          Dave,
            I have been looking into the lack of infrastructure and activity on terrestrial VHF/UHF packet radio, especially keyboarding, here in North Carolina.  There does seem to be a complete lack of even medium distance radio linked packet except for APRS.  Most everything has moved off to Internet.  The packet radio that does exist seems to be a last-mile run from users to and from the Internet supported servers and that includes APRS and conference nodes.  While that is fine for many, it is boring to me.  I like to see radio networks and I miss the days of the North East Digital Association when I could line up dozens of radios in a row to connect to a distant station.  NEDA died when half of the node ops decided ham radio was unnecessary now that they had cable modems.  

          I’m trying to find a growth formula to boost terrestrial Amateur Radio networking again.  My take on why packet radio has died down and why no network has sprung up is that the proponents are focussing on providing capability which is trivially duplicated on the Internet, and they are thinking in terms of putting up packet stations, instead of putting up radio links.  I suggest a change in focus.  I’m thinking of calling it TARPN (Terrestrial Amateur Radio Packet Network). The point of TARPN isn’t passing digital traffic, it is using Amateur Radio to make a packet network.  What if we disallowed all automated data transactions to and from the Internet.  How crazy is that?  Manual data transactions, yes.  Automated, no.  

           I too like the Raspberry PI and TNC-PI combination.  John helped me last week to set up a Raspberry PI/TNC PI combo for keyboarding.  I’m working on documentation and scripting to make it possible for an unskilled person to build a G8BPQ Node and use it for keyboarding on a TARPN.  

            What I’m doing is taking advantage of the multiple-radio capabilities of the TNC-PI and G8BPQ node code to permit the use of dedicated links between the packet users.  This works much better than telling users to all show up on the same frequency.  Hidden Transmitter problems are done away with.   

          The solution I've put together, partially on this reflector and with lots of John’s help both on-line and documentation, is to create packet radio links between one-or-more port BPQ nodes using TNC-PIs in I2C mode.  I2C mode gives us the ability to have up to 30 ports if we want it but works with one port.  The links are on dedicated frequencies per link where frequencies are only used by a 3rd and 4th station out of range of the 1st and 2nd station.  The math works out where each station has slightly more than 2 radios involved in the system, on average.  The goodness is that the throughput available to each user is 80 characters per second on a 1200 baud network, with reducing throughput the further the user connects into the network, on average, and depending on how much traffic is flowing through.  This compares rather well to the old days when users were dividing up an 8 character per second channel (because of HTS) or worse.  The network will be full of short house-to-house hops. 

           The individual station can be stand-alone on the PI with Minicom and the HTTP interface in concert.  Minicom is used for incoming packet calls.  It even rings like a telephone out of the speaker jack on the Raspberry PI when somebody connects in (thanks John!).  Outgoing connects can be made in several ways including by launching browser windows.  You can have many.  This solution works with a stand-alone Raspberry PI with a monitor, keyboard and mouse plugged in, or with the PI serving as the packet radio accessory and using a desktop PC or laptop as the command device.  The PI still does the ringing when somebody connects to the operator, however.  

            I’m test-driving my documentation right now and working with a few local hams to generate Linux scripting to automatically set up the code on the Raspberry PI.  My documentation is rather large at this time because of the specific details that have to be played with to set up the G8BPQ node and TNC-PIs.  When I’m done I think the documentation can be brought down to a half dozen pages and success will be a little more assured. 

          I’m basing our first deployment on available off-the-shelf hardware and some things (like TNC<==> radio cables) which are hand made.  We have a few vapor-ware ideas but those are for later.  

           When I started talking about this on the repeaters the response has been very positive.  

          Feel free to contact me directly.  

             Tadd, KA2DEW, Raleigh NC.  

          Tadd Torborg



          On Feb 12, 2014, at 11:36 AM, John Wiseman <john.wiseman@...> wrote:


          Dave,

          If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the " Keyboard to Keyboard Connections" section of the TNCPI manual for instructions on setting it up.

          If you want others to be able to connect to you things are a little more complicated. BPQ isn't a BBS program, it is a Node with optional BBS and Chat server programs, and can be configured to allow you to make terminal-terminal calls, and others to connect to you.

          73,

          John

           

           


          From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf OfDavid R. Hassall
          Sent: 12 February 2014 14:40
          To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

           

           

          Dear John,

          I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
          the 
          PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
          feeling
          from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
          keyboard
          to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
          activity
          has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not 
          be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

          Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the  USA are extremely

          expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
          they
          are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
          even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
          disappeared
          as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation. 

          I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the 
          Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
          experimentation
          using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
          others
          don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
          that
          will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

          and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that 
          really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position 
          for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an 
          adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful. 

          Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
          software
          writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one. 

          Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi 
          and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
          existing 
          packet networks here in  New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
          1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
          packet
          racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

          a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

          73 Dave
          David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
          WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/



        • Simon Thompson
          The keyboard network is what I am interested. I thought I had asked for John s help with this, but I have not had specific direction yet. ... The keyboard
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
            The keyboard network is what I am interested. I thought I had asked for John's help with this, but I have not had specific direction yet.

            On Feb 12, 2014, at 9:49, Tadd Torborg <tadd@...> wrote:

             

            Dave,

              I have been looking into the lack of infrastructure and activity on terrestrial VHF/UHF packet radio, especially keyboarding, here in North Carolina.  There does seem to be a complete lack of even medium distance radio linked packet except for APRS.  Most everything has moved off to Internet.  The packet radio that does exist seems to be a last-mile run from users to and from the Internet supported servers and that includes APRS and conference nodes.  While that is fine for many, it is boring to me.  I like to see radio networks and I miss the days of the North East Digital Association when I could line up dozens of radios in a row to connect to a distant station.  NEDA died when half of the node ops decided ham radio was unnecessary now that they had cable modems.  

            I’m trying to find a growth formula to boost terrestrial Amateur Radio networking again.  My take on why packet radio has died down and why no network has sprung up is that the proponents are focussing on providing capability which is trivially duplicated on the Internet, and they are thinking in terms of putting up packet stations, instead of putting up radio links.  I suggest a change in focus.  I’m thinking of calling it TARPN (Terrestrial Amateur Radio Packet Network). The point of TARPN isn’t passing digital traffic, it is using Amateur Radio to make a packet network.  What if we disallowed all automated data transactions to and from the Internet.  How crazy is that?  Manual data transactions, yes.  Automated, no.  

             I too like the Raspberry PI and TNC-PI combination.  John helped me last week to set up a Raspberry PI/TNC PI combo for keyboarding.  I’m working on documentation and scripting to make it possible for an unskilled person to build a G8BPQ Node and use it for keyboarding on a TARPN.  

              What I’m doing is taking advantage of the multiple-radio capabilities of the TNC-PI and G8BPQ node code to permit the use of dedicated links between the packet users.  This works much better than telling users to all show up on the same frequency.  Hidden Transmitter problems are done away with.   

            The solution I've put together, partially on this reflector and with lots of John’s help both on-line and documentation, is to create packet radio links between one-or-more port BPQ nodes using TNC-PIs in I2C mode.  I2C mode gives us the ability to have up to 30 ports if we want it but works with one port.  The links are on dedicated frequencies per link where frequencies are only used by a 3rd and 4th station out of range of the 1st and 2nd station.  The math works out where each station has slightly more than 2 radios involved in the system, on average.  The goodness is that the throughput available to each user is 80 characters per second on a 1200 baud network, with reducing throughput the further the user connects into the network, on average, and depending on how much traffic is flowing through.  This compares rather well to the old days when users were dividing up an 8 character per second channel (because of HTS) or worse.  The network will be full of short house-to-house hops. 

             The individual station can be stand-alone on the PI with Minicom and the HTTP interface in concert.  Minicom is used for incoming packet calls.  It even rings like a telephone out of the speaker jack on the Raspberry PI when somebody connects in (thanks John!).  Outgoing connects can be made in several ways including by launching browser windows.  You can have many.  This solution works with a stand-alone Raspberry PI with a monitor, keyboard and mouse plugged in, or with the PI serving as the packet radio accessory and using a desktop PC or laptop as the command device.  The PI still does the ringing when somebody connects to the operator, however.  

              I’m test-driving my documentation right now and working with a few local hams to generate Linux scripting to automatically set up the code on the Raspberry PI.  My documentation is rather large at this time because of the specific details that have to be played with to set up the G8BPQ node and TNC-PIs.  When I’m done I think the documentation can be brought down to a half dozen pages and success will be a little more assured. 

            I’m basing our first deployment on available off-the-shelf hardware and some things (like TNC<==> radio cables) which are hand made.  We have a few vapor-ware ideas but those are for later.  

             When I started talking about this on the repeaters the response has been very positive.  

            Feel free to contact me directly.  

               Tadd, KA2DEW, Raleigh NC.  

            Tadd Torborg



            On Feb 12, 2014, at 11:36 AM, John Wiseman <john.wiseman@...> wrote:


            Dave,

            If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the " Keyboard to Keyboard Connections" section of the TNCPI manual for instructions on setting it up.

            If you want others to be able to connect to you things are a little more complicated. BPQ isn't a BBS program, it is a Node with optional BBS and Chat server programs, and can be configured to allow you to make terminal-terminal calls, and others to connect to you.

            73,

            John

             

             


            From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf OfDavid R. Hassall
            Sent: 12 February 2014 14:40
            To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

             

             

            Dear John,

            I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
            the 
            PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
            feeling
            from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
            keyboard
            to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
            activity
            has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not 
            be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

            Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the  USA are extremely

            expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
            they
            are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
            even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
            disappeared
            as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation. 

            I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the 
            Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
            experimentation
            using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
            others
            don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
            that
            will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

            and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that 
            really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position 
            for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an 
            adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful. 

            Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
            software
            writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one. 

            Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi 
            and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
            existing 
            packet networks here in  New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
            1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
            packet
            racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

            a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

            73 Dave
            David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
            WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/



          • Simon Thompson
            I have never seen this section of the tnc Pi manual. Where can I find it?
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
              I have never seen this section of the tnc Pi manual. Where can I find it?

              On Feb 12, 2014, at 8:36, John Wiseman <john.wiseman@...> wrote:

               

              Dave,

              If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the " Keyboard to Keyboard Connections" section of the TNCPI manual for instructions on setting it up.

              If you want others to be able to connect to you things are a little more complicated. BPQ isn't a BBS program, it is a Node with optional BBS and Chat server programs, and can be configured to allow you to make terminal-terminal calls, and others to connect to you.

              73,

              John

               

               


              From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David R. Hassall
              Sent: 12 February 2014 14:40
              To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

               

               

              Dear John,

              I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
              the
              PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
              feeling
              from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
              keyboard
              to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
              activity
              has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
              be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

              Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

              expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
              they
              are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
              even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
              disappeared
              as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

              I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
              Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
              experimentation
              using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
              others
              don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
              that
              will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

              and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
              really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
              for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
              adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

              Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
              software
              writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

              Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
              and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
              existing
              packet networks here in New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
              1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
              packet
              racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

              a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

              73 Dave
              David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
              WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/

            • John Guillory
              I was under the impression you used minicom -- KF5QEO John Guillory westlakegeek@yahoo.com Cell: 601-754-9233 Pinger: 337-240-7890 Google Voice: 601-265-1307
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
                I was under the impression you used minicom

                --
                KF5QEO
                John Guillory
                Cell: 601-754-9233
                Pinger: 337-240-7890
                Google Voice: 601-265-1307

              • John Wiseman
                Dave, http://tnc-x.com/TNCPi.pdf John _____ From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Simon
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014

                  Dave,

                   

                  http://tnc-x.com/TNCPi.pdf

                   

                  John

                   


                  From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Simon Thompson
                  Sent: 12 February 2014 18:08
                  To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

                   

                   

                  I have never seen this section of the tnc Pi manual. Where can I find it?


                  On Feb 12, 2014, at 8:36, John Wiseman <john.wiseman@...> wrote:

                   

                  Dave,

                  If you just want to connect to another station or BBS, then you can use axcall. See the " Keyboard to Keyboard Connections" section of the TNCPI manual for instructions on setting it up.

                  If you want others to be able to connect to you things are a little more complicated. BPQ isn't a BBS program, it is a Node with optional BBS and Chat server programs, and can be configured to allow you to make terminal-terminal calls, and others to connect to you.

                  73,

                  John

                   

                   


                  From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David R. Hassall
                  Sent: 12 February 2014 14:40
                  To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

                   

                   

                  Dear John,

                  I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one of
                  the
                  PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
                  feeling
                  from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
                  keyboard
                  to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
                  activity
                  has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
                  be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

                  Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

                  expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
                  they
                  are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
                  even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
                  disappeared
                  as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

                  I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
                  Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
                  experimentation
                  using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
                  others
                  don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
                  that
                  will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

                  and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
                  really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
                  for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
                  adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

                  Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
                  software
                  writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

                  Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
                  and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
                  existing
                  packet networks here in New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
                  1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
                  packet
                  racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

                  a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

                  73 Dave
                  David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
                  WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/

                • David R. Hassall
                  Dear Tadd and group, All of that sounds interesting an somewhat complicated for what I am trying to do. We have existing most of our old packet 1200 baud
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 12, 2014
                    Dear Tadd and group,

                    All of that sounds interesting an somewhat complicated for what I am trying
                    to do. We have existing most of our old packet 1200 baud network covering
                    most of New Mexico's major cities. We are lucky in this state as they are
                    all on high mountain tops and with a good antenna and about 30 watts or so
                    you can jump from node to node and go across the state in minutes. This
                    existing network is not being utilized very much and most of the reason is
                    finding inexpensive TNC's. I really wish TAPR would reinvent the TNC-2...
                    You can probably put it in a matchbox.

                    To use the Raspberry PI and TNCPi combination on this network we need a KISS
                    terminal program for the PI. By using this little computer board as the
                    packet engine with KISS software it can be used with ANY packet existing
                    packet network. There are windows KISS programs but so far I have found
                    nothing for the Raspberry Pi.

                    So, you end up using the TNCPi KISS Modem for APRS While it could also be
                    used for KEYBOARD to KEYBOARD COMMUNICATIONS or for data communications in
                    an emergency with very little effort. When I was working in North Carolina
                    back in the 1980's I remember a Hurricane that ran up the coast and a whole
                    bunch of Emergency Managers were very glad that a simple Ad Hoc packet
                    network
                    existed. For quite a few days that was their only link into and out of some
                    of those remote counties. It is a technology we need to keep active and
                    alive
                    in case of other either local or national disasters come to pass and somehow
                    the INTERNET suddenly doesn't work. With a simple NODE, an antenna and a
                    drive
                    to a mountain top and suddenly lots of people can talk again. something
                    that
                    isn't possible with the one-liners on APRS.

                    Sorry for the soapbox....I just think we are missing a bet....We just need
                    a KISS modem software for the PI and the TNCPi and Raspberry pi could be
                    a simple fantastic keyboard to keyboard Amateur Radio communications device.

                    73 Dave

                    David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
                    WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/
                  • Tadd Torborg
                    I wonder if this TNC: http://www.argentdata.com/products/tracker3.html would work? ItÆs $45. This one is quite interesting. http://www.mobilinkd.com It seems
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 13, 2014
                      I wonder if this TNC:
                       would work?  It’s $45.  

                      This one is quite interesting.  
                        It seems to want a computer with BlueTooth Serial protocol which means an Android Tablet or phone, I think.  
                          Tadd

                      Tadd Torborg



                      On Feb 12, 2014, at 6:31 PM, David R. Hassall <dhassall@...> wrote:

                      Dear Tadd and group, 

                      All of that sounds interesting an somewhat complicated for what I am trying 
                      to do. We have existing most of our old packet 1200 baud network covering 
                      most of New Mexico's major cities. We are lucky in this state as they are
                      all on high mountain tops and with a good antenna and about 30 watts or so 
                      you can jump from node to node and go across the state in minutes. This 
                      existing network is not being utilized very much and most of the reason is
                      finding inexpensive TNC's. I really wish TAPR would reinvent the TNC-2...
                      You can probably put it in a matchbox. 

                      To use the Raspberry PI and TNCPi combination on this network we need a KISS
                      terminal program for the PI. By using this little computer board as the 
                      packet engine with KISS software it can be used with ANY packet existing 
                      packet network. There are windows KISS programs but so far I have found 
                      nothing for the Raspberry Pi. 

                      So, you end up using the TNCPi KISS Modem for APRS While it could also be 
                      used for KEYBOARD to KEYBOARD COMMUNICATIONS or for data communications in 
                      an emergency with very little effort. When I was working in North Carolina
                      back in the 1980's I remember a Hurricane that ran up the coast and a whole
                      bunch of Emergency Managers were very glad that a simple Ad Hoc packet
                      network
                      existed. For quite a few days that was their only link into and out of some
                      of those remote counties. It is a technology we need to keep active and
                      alive
                      in case of other either local or national disasters come to pass and somehow
                      the INTERNET suddenly doesn't work. With a simple NODE, an antenna and a
                      drive
                      to a mountain top and suddenly lots of people can talk again. something
                      that
                      isn't possible with the one-liners on APRS.

                      Sorry for the soapbox....I just think we are missing a bet....We just need 
                      a KISS modem software for the PI and the TNCPi and Raspberry pi could be
                      a simple fantastic keyboard to keyboard Amateur Radio communications device.

                      73 Dave

                      David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
                      WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/


                    • Simon Thompson
                      I have got Linbpq running. I enter the command TALK at the prompt, VE7SXS-1}, and the program says, Sorry, all TALK ports are in use - Please try later.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 16, 2014
                        I have got Linbpq running. I enter the command "TALK" at the prompt, VE7SXS-1}, and the program says, "Sorry, all TALK ports are in use - Please try later. 00:34:10T VE7SXS-1<1D Port=1 <UI C>:"

                        And then the prompt comes back and says, "Sorry, all TALK ports are in use - Please try later. 00:34:22T VE7SXS-1<1D Port=1 <UI C>:"

                        Can anyone tell me what this means?
                        On Feb 12, 2014, at 6:40, "David R. Hassall" <dhassall@...> wrote:

                         

                        Dear John,

                        I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one
                        the
                        PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
                        feeling
                        from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
                        keyboard
                        to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
                        activity
                        has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
                        be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

                        Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

                        expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
                        they
                        are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
                        even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
                        disappeared
                        as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

                        I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
                        Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
                        experimentation
                        using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
                        others
                        don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
                        that
                        will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

                        and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
                        really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
                        for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
                        adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

                        Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
                        software
                        writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

                        Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
                        and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
                        existing
                        packet networks here in New Mexico. I am still running an old and tired MFJ
                        1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
                        packet
                        racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

                        a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

                        73 Dave
                        David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
                        WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/

                      • John Wiseman
                        It means that there isn t a free terminal to connect to. If you want to connect to yourself you must have at least two terminal sessions available with CONOK
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 17, 2014

                          It means that there isn't a free terminal to connect to. If you want to connect to yourself you must have at least two terminal sessions available with CONOK set - one to connect from and one to connect to. To receive calls, the session must also not be connected to the node (ie it must be at the cmd: prompt).

                           

                          73, John

                           


                          From: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Simon Thompson
                          Sent: 17 February 2014 00:47
                          To: Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: What program do I use to do keyboard to keyboard packet radio wi

                           

                           

                          I have got Linbpq running. I enter the command "TALK" at the prompt, VE7SXS-1}, and the program says, "Sorry, all TALK ports are in use - Please try later. 00:34:10T VE7SXS-1<1D Port=1 <UI C>:"

                           

                          And then the prompt comes back and says, "Sorry, all TALK ports are in use - Please try later. 00:34:22T VE7SXS-1<1D Port=1 <UI C>:"

                           

                          Can anyone tell me what this means?

                          On Feb 12, 2014, at 6:40, "David R. Hassall" <dhassall@...> wrote:

                           

                          Dear John,

                          I know you're the inventor of the BBS program BPQ and that is also one
                          the
                          PI challenges for me to try in the near future. But I am getting the
                          feeling
                          from the returns I am getting from the group is that there isn't a KISS
                          keyboard
                          to keyboard packet terminal program in Linux. Since most of the packet
                          activity
                          has gone to the APRS side... Keyboard to Keyboard AX.25 packet seems to not
                          be supported by anyone. How are we going to get customers into your BBS's?

                          Since most of the existing AX.25 Packet controllers in the USA are extremely

                          expensive for what they do or have so many different built in modes that
                          they
                          are so complicated to operate that it turns many Amateurs OFF and they don't
                          even try to get it going. The inexpensive (Less than $100) have also
                          disappeared
                          as those companies have gone on to other things or ceased operation.

                          I was hoping that there was a Keyboard to Keyboard packet program for the
                          Raspberry PI/TNCPi combination that could be used to rekindle both
                          experimentation
                          using a inexpensive computer platform and 1200 baud VHF Packet. Maybe
                          others
                          don't see this opportunity or the Massive hole in our needs for software
                          that
                          will allow folks to buy a TNCPi and a Raspberry Pi and hook it up to a radio

                          and start exploring. Sort of a updated replacement for the TAPR TNC-2 that
                          really changed Amateur Radio in the 1980's and still has a viable position
                          for building emergency communications data networks on the FLY. Even an
                          adaptation of the BAYCOM software would be really helpful.

                          Well, I will keep begging for something.... Maybe some young enterprising
                          software
                          writer is working away in his dungeon, trying to build one.

                          Thanks for your answer and for your influence in the Raspberry Pi and TNCPi
                          and all that it has presently become. I see your BBS's on some of the
                          existing
                          packet networks here in New Mexico . I am still running an old and tired MFJ
                          1274 on VHF Packet and remember the good old days when there was lots of
                          packet
                          racket on 145.01 MHz. Maybe those days could come back with a Cheap TNC and

                          a Bao Feng hand held and maybe not. In any case, I will be here waiting.

                          73 Dave
                          David R. Hassall WA5DJJ
                          WEBSITE: http://www.zianet.com/dhassall/

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