Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Raspberry Pi/What OS To Use

Expand Messages
  • gespillman
    John, I would suggest that for whichever OS you use, that you download the current version and load it on a SD card. It is likely that the preloaded SD cards
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      John,

      I would suggest that for whichever OS you use, that you download the current version and load it on a SD card. It is likely that the preloaded SD cards have an older version of the OS.

      Jerry
      N6HFR

      --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, "John" <n0meq@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a DVap and want to use a Raspberry pi. I want to use it as a portable unit. At home it would be connected via Ethernet to a router, I was also thinking wifi on the Pi as well. This might be a large open question for debate but what would be the best OS to use? I have seen many using raspbian Wheezy. I have also seen preloaded sd cards.... Any suggestions would be helpful!
      >
      > John
      > N0MEQ
      >
    • pmooney22
      The current version of Rasbian is based upon (and named after) the latest version of Debian Linux which uses the characters from the film Toy Story i.e.
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        The current version of Rasbian is based upon (and named after) the latest version of Debian Linux which uses the characters from the film 'Toy Story' i.e. 'Raspbian Wheezy'.

        The next version, which may take up to two years to release, is named 'Jessie'

        HTH

        Paul
        5B8BA

        --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Max Harper <kg4pid@...> wrote:
        >
        > John, you said "Most people use Raspbian or Wheezy from http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads" I don't understand the Raspbian or Wheezy as I thought it was just Raspbian Wheezy. You make it sound as though it is two different OSs but I only see "Raspbian Wheezy" as a download. This a been an area of confusion as I have seen it printed like this before. So which is it?
        >  
        > A. Raspbian
        > B. Wheezy
        > C. Raspbian Wheezy 
        >
      • John Ferrell
        Is the OS that runs on the Pi written in the ARM language or something else? In working with the port interfaces it appears that programming in c is OK for
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Is the OS that runs on the Pi written in the ARM language or something else?

          In working with the port interfaces it appears that programming in 'c'
          is OK for those apps.

          On 6/16/2013 6:42 AM, pmooney22 wrote:
          > The current version of Rasbian is based upon (and named after) the
          > latest version of Debian Linux which uses the characters from the film
          > 'Toy Story' i.e. 'Raspbian Wheezy'.
          >
          > The next version, which may take up to two years to release, is named
          > 'Jessie'
          >
          > HTH
          >
          > Paul
          > 5B8BA

          --
          John Ferrell W8CCW
          "The pessimist complains about the wind;
          The optimist expects it to change;
          The realist adjusts the sails."
          William A. Ward
        • John D. Hays
          In runs the code built from Linux sources (mostly C ) compiled for ARM processor. You simply load the images from the download site and run from them, you
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            In runs the code built from Linux sources (mostly 'C') compiled for ARM processor.   You simply load the images from the download site and run from them, you don't need to worry about the language or processor language.  If you want to compile your own programs a large number of languages are available, e.g.  C/C++, Python, Pascal, Fortran, Cobol, Lisp, Assembly, Ruby, PHP, ...  all of which will run under Linux on ARM. 



            John D. Hays
            K7VE
            PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
              


            On Sun, Jun 16, 2013 at 6:35 AM, John Ferrell <jferrell13@...> wrote:
             

            Is the OS that runs on the Pi written in the ARM language or something else?

            In working with the port interfaces it appears that programming in 'c'
            is OK for those apps.



            On 6/16/2013 6:42 AM, pmooney22 wrote:
            > The current version of Rasbian is based upon (and named after) the
            > latest version of Debian Linux which uses the characters from the film
            > 'Toy Story' i.e. 'Raspbian Wheezy'.
            >
            > The next version, which may take up to two years to release, is named
            > 'Jessie'
            >
            > HTH
            >
            > Paul
            > 5B8BA

            --
            John Ferrell W8CCW
            "The pessimist complains about the wind;
            The optimist expects it to change;
            The realist adjusts the sails."
            William A. Ward


          • John Ferrell
            Thanks, I thought that was the way things were working. I have problems enough staying on the Linux side of things. Bringing up Wheezy with an xfce desktop
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks, I thought that was the way things were working. I have problems enough staying on the Linux side of things.  Bringing up Wheezy with an xfce  desktop on an ordinary PC  has not proven to be a simple task!
                   
              On 6/16/2013 8:16 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
              In runs the code built from Linux sources (mostly 'C') compiled for ARM processor.   You simply load the images from the download site and run from them, you don't need to worry about the language or processor language.  If you want to compile your own programs a large number of languages are available, e.g.  C/C++, Python, Pascal, Fortran, Cobol, Lisp, Assembly, Ruby, PHP, ...  all of which will run under Linux on ARM. 



              John D. Hays
              K7VE

              -- 
              John Ferrell W8CCW
              "The pessimist complains about the wind;
              The optimist expects it to change;
              The realist adjusts the sails."
                   William A. Ward 
            • John D. Hays
              If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu. http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop -- its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu.http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop -- its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for the desktop user. 

                If you are running Windows on a PC, try xrdp  (apt-get install xrdp) and use Window's remote desktop. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/connect-to-another-computer-using-remote-desktop-connection



                John D. Hays
                K7VE
                PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
                  





                On Sun, Jun 16, 2013 at 5:41 PM, John Ferrell <jferrell13@...> wrote:
                 

                Thanks, I thought that was the way things were working. I have problems enough staying on the Linux side of things.  Bringing up Wheezy with an xfce  desktop on an ordinary PC  has not proven to be a simple task!


                     
                On 6/16/2013 8:16 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
                In runs the code built from Linux sources (mostly 'C') compiled for ARM processor.   You simply load the images from the download site and run from them, you don't need to worry about the language or processor language.  If you want to compile your own programs a large number of languages are available, e.g.  C/C++, Python, Pascal, Fortran, Cobol, Lisp, Assembly, Ruby, PHP, ...  all of which will run under Linux on ARM. 



                John D. Hays
                K7VE

                -- 
                John Ferrell W8CCW
                "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                The optimist expects it to change;
                The realist adjusts the sails."
                     William A. Ward 

              • John Ferrell
                I think I tried that and had problems, but I will try it again. I am working hard and learning fast. I bought 10 HDD s on EBAY to work with so I don t have to
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  I think I tried that and had problems, but I will try it again. I am working hard and learning fast. I bought 10 HDD's on EBAY to work with so I don't have to destroy anything to try something different.  Gnome 3 is not likely to ever work with Windows Remote Desktop.
                  That is why I was working with xfce.

                  On 6/16/2013 9:06 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
                  If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu.http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop -- its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for the desktop user. 

                  If you are running Windows on a PC, try xrdp  (apt-get install xrdp) and use Window's remote desktop. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/connect-to-another-computer-using-remote-desktop-connection



                  John D. Hays
                  K7VE

                  -- 
                  John Ferrell W8CCW
                  "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                  The optimist expects it to change;
                  The realist adjusts the sails."
                       William A. Ward 
                • Ray Wells
                  The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it s a rolling release so you don t have to reinstall every year or three as new releases arrive. Just
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it's a rolling release so you don't have to reinstall every year or three as new releases arrive. Just keep doing apt-get update and apt-get upgrade. Admittedly, Ubuntu avoids most "Debianisms".

                    Ray vk2tv


                    On 17/06/13 11:32, John Ferrell wrote:
                     

                    I think I tried that and had problems, but I will try it again. I am working hard and learning fast. I bought 10 HDD's on EBAY to work with so I don't have to destroy anything to try something different.  Gnome 3 is not likely to ever work with Windows Remote Desktop.
                    That is why I was working with xfce.

                    On 6/16/2013 9:06 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
                    If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu.http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop --its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for the desktop user. 

                    If you are running Windows on a PC, try xrdp  (apt-get install xrdp) and use Window's remote desktop. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/connect-to-another-computer-using-remote-desktop-connection



                    John D. Hays
                    K7VE

                    -- 
                    John Ferrell W8CCW
                    "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                    The optimist expects it to change;
                    The realist adjusts the sails."
                         William A. Ward 

                • wa5bdu
                  I think versions of the Linux OS are just about always written in C. In this case, it was probably compiled on the gcc compiler. It comes with the Raspian OS
                  Message 9 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I think versions of the Linux OS are just about always written in C. In this case, it was probably compiled on the gcc compiler. It comes with the Raspian OS installation, BTW, and compiles down to ARM code.

                    73-

                    Nick, WA5BDU
                  • Matthew Pitts
                    You don t have to reinstall unless you want to; do apt-get dist-upgrade , change the repository entries to the new version, then do apt-get update apt-get
                    Message 10 of 20 , Jun 16, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment

                      You don't have to reinstall unless you want to; do "apt-get dist-upgrade", change the repository entries to the new version, then do "apt-get update" "apt-get upgrade". This method is actually the best way to get the latest release of Raspian as well, though I'm not sure if there are separate repository entries for that.

                      Matthew Pitts
                      N8OHU

                      Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



                      From: Ray Wells <vk2tv@...>;
                      To: <Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com>;
                      Cc: John Ferrell <jferrell13@...>;
                      Subject: Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: Raspberry Pi/What OS To Use
                      Sent: Mon, Jun 17, 2013 1:41:09 AM

                       

                      The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it's a rolling release so you don't have to reinstall every year or three as new releases arrive. Just keep doing apt-get update and apt-get upgrade. Admittedly, Ubuntu avoids most "Debianisms".

                      Ray vk2tv


                      On 17/06/13 11:32, John Ferrell wrote:
                       

                      I think I tried that and had problems, but I will try it again. I am working hard and learning fast. I bought 10 HDD's on EBAY to work with so I don't have to destroy anything to try something different.  Gnome 3 is not likely to ever work with Windows Remote Desktop.
                      That is why I was working with xfce.

                      On 6/16/2013 9:06 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
                      If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu.http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop --its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for the desktop user. 

                      If you are running Windows on a PC, try xrdp  (apt-get install xrdp) and use Window's remote desktop. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/connect-to-another-computer-using-remote-desktop-connection



                      John D. Hays
                      K7VE

                      -- 
                      John Ferrell W8CCW
                      "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                      The optimist expects it to change;
                      The realist adjusts the sails."
                           William A. Ward 

                    • pmooney22
                      Much of Linux is written in C, and compiled ARM for the Pi. The most common compiler is gcc Paul 5B8BA
                      Message 11 of 20 , Jun 19, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Much of Linux is written in C, and compiled ARM for the Pi.

                        The most common compiler is gcc

                        Paul
                        5B8BA
                      • pmooney22
                        Sorry Ray, have to disagree. Debian Stable (wheezy) most definately is not a rolling release. Debian testing (Jessie) is a rolling relese in that have been
                        Message 12 of 20 , Jun 19, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Sorry Ray, have to disagree.

                          Debian Stable (wheezy) most definately is not a rolling release.

                          Debian testing (Jessie) is a rolling relese in that have been (fairly) thoroughly tested in Debian unstable (Sid). In a year or two 'Jessie' will replace 'Wheezy' as the stable release.

                          I would not recommend Jessie or Sid (especially the latter) to anybody who does not have a fairly extensive knowledge of Linux.

                          Linux Mint Debian Edition takes updates from Jessie, so could be described as a rolling release.

                          Ubuntu have stated their intention to move back towards Debian. They have the unfortuante tendency to put dates on their releases and get them out on time, 100% ready or not.

                          paul 5B8BA



                          --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it's a rolling
                          > release so you don't have to reinstall every year or three as new
                          > releases arrive. Just keep doing apt-get update and apt-get upgrade.
                          > Admittedly, Ubuntu avoids most "Debianisms".
                          >
                          > Ray vk2tv
                        • rosswebmail
                          I would never bother with getting a preloaded SD card. I go with the fabulous NOOBS installation, which lets you easily try different OSs and HTPCs.
                          Message 13 of 20 , Jun 19, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I would never bother with getting a preloaded SD card. I go with the fabulous "NOOBS" installation, which lets you easily try different OSs and HTPCs.

                            http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/tag/noobs (see the "downloads" link in the 3rd paragraph).

                            Ross NN5RR



                            --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, "John" <n0meq@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I have a DVap and want to use a Raspberry pi. I want to use it as a portable unit. At home it would be connected via Ethernet to a router, I was also thinking wifi on the Pi as well. This might be a large open question for debate but what would be the best OS to use? I have seen many using raspbian Wheezy. I have also seen preloaded sd cards.... Any suggestions would be helpful!
                            >
                            > John
                            > N0MEQ
                            >
                          • Ray Wells
                            Thanks Paul, I stand corrected. If you want to experience the ultimate confusion regarding rolling releases take a look here ...
                            Message 14 of 20 , Jun 19, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Thanks Paul, I stand corrected.

                              If you want to experience the ultimate confusion regarding "rolling" releases take a look here ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_release

                              Ray vk2tv


                              On 19/06/13 19:42, pmooney22 wrote:
                               

                              Sorry Ray, have to disagree.

                              Debian Stable (wheezy) most definately is not a rolling release.

                              Debian testing (Jessie) is a rolling relese in that have been (fairly) thoroughly tested in Debian unstable (Sid). In a year or two 'Jessie' will replace 'Wheezy' as the stable release.

                              I would not recommend Jessie or Sid (especially the latter) to anybody who does not have a fairly extensive knowledge of Linux.

                              Linux Mint Debian Edition takes updates from Jessie, so could be described as a rolling release.

                              Ubuntu have stated their intention to move back towards Debian. They have the unfortuante tendency to put dates on their releases and get them out on time, 100% ready or not.

                              paul 5B8BA

                              --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it's a rolling
                              > release so you don't have to reinstall every year or three as new
                              > releases arrive. Just keep doing apt-get update and apt-get upgrade.
                              > Admittedly, Ubuntu avoids most "Debianisms".
                              >
                              > Ray vk2tv


                            • Ray Wells
                              My mistake got the better of me. Looks like I missed Wheezy going from testing to stable just a few weeks back .... From http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/
                              Message 15 of 20 , Jun 20, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                My mistake got the better of me.

                                Looks like I missed Wheezy going from testing to stable just a few weeks back ....

                                From http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/

                                "Debian 7.1 was released June 15th, 2013. Debian 7.0 was initially released on May 4th, 2013. "

                                I run vanilla Debian testing on my "radio" computers and Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE, which is their version of Debian testing) on my laptop. The desktop is still an older Ubuntu based Linux Mint (12 from memory) but this will move to LMDE when its time expires.

                                Ray vk2tv

                                On 20/06/13 08:59, Ray Wells wrote:
                                 

                                Thanks Paul, I stand corrected.

                                If you want to experience the ultimate confusion regarding "rolling" releases take a look here ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_release

                                Ray vk2tv


                                On 19/06/13 19:42, pmooney22 wrote:
                                 

                                Sorry Ray, have to disagree.

                                Debian Stable (wheezy) most definately is not a rolling release.

                                Debian testing (Jessie) is a rolling relese in that have been (fairly) thoroughly tested in Debian unstable (Sid). In a year or two 'Jessie' will replace 'Wheezy' as the stable release.

                                I would not recommend Jessie or Sid (especially the latter) to anybody who does not have a fairly extensive knowledge of Linux.

                                Linux Mint Debian Edition takes updates from Jessie, so could be described as a rolling release.

                                Ubuntu have stated their intention to move back towards Debian. They have the unfortuante tendency to put dates on their releases and get them out on time, 100% ready or not.

                                paul 5B8BA

                                --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Ray Wells <vk2tv@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > The advantage that vanilla Debian has over Ubuntu is it's a rolling
                                > release so you don't have to reinstall every year or three as new
                                > releases arrive. Just keep doing apt-get update and apt-get upgrade.
                                > Admittedly, Ubuntu avoids most "Debianisms".
                                >
                                > Ray vk2tv



                              • John Ferrell
                                FWIW: Debian 7/ Gnome Classic Desktop, I choose this combination to learn Linux so that I would be better prepared to work with Raspberry Wheezy. Here is the
                                Message 16 of 20 , Jun 23, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  FWIW: Debian 7/ Gnome Classic Desktop, I choose this combination to learn Linux so that I would be better prepared to work with Raspberry Wheezy.
                                  Here is the report ...
                                  Project:
                                  Debian 7.0.0    i386
                                  Net Install
                                  {curly braces are comments}
                                  {whenever asked, choose classic Gnome}
                                  Parameters:
                                      Debian Desk
                                      Print service
                                      SSH
                                      Standard System Utilities
                                  visudo:    john        ALL=(ALL:ALL)     NOPASSWD=ALL
                                  ssh -X        {I don't think this neccessary}

                                  {UltraVNC would log in from Win 7, but  no sound and required host permission}
                                  Install xrdp

                                  {Now Win7 Remote Desktop works including sound. No indication on the Host}

                                  {a 20G drive was used and indicated  14G free at this point}

                                  On 6/16/2013 9:32 PM, John Ferrell wrote:
                                   

                                  I think I tried that and had problems, but I will try it again. I am working hard and learning fast. I bought 10 HDD's on EBAY to work with so I don't have to destroy anything to try something different.  Gnome 3 is not likely to ever work with Windows Remote Desktop.
                                  That is why I was working with xfce.

                                  On 6/16/2013 9:06 PM, John D. Hays wrote:
                                  If you are doing a native Linux desktop on a PC, try Ubuntu.http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop --its a derivative of Debian but much better developed for the desktop user. 

                                  If you are running Windows on a PC, try xrdp  (apt-get install xrdp) and use Window's remote desktop. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/connect-to-another-computer-using-remote-desktop-connection



                                  John D. Hays
                                  K7VE

                                  -- 
                                  John Ferrell W8CCW
                                  "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                                  The optimist expects it to change;
                                  The realist adjusts the sails."
                                       William A. Ward 

                                  -- 
                                  John Ferrell W8CCW
                                  "The pessimist complains about the wind;
                                  The optimist expects it to change;
                                  The realist adjusts the sails."
                                       William A. Ward 
                                • Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.