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Re: Poll: computing background of people starting of with the RasPi

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  • Brian
    ... Nothing. The first computer I programmed used paper tape. It also used valves (tubes). It was 1968 or so, when I was in my early years at Grammar school.
    Message 1 of 24 , Apr 24, 2013
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      --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Dave Cochran <dave@...> wrote:
      >
      > What was wrong with the paper tapes? Lol


      Nothing.

      The first computer I programmed used paper tape. It also used valves (tubes). It was 1968 or so, when I was in my early years at Grammar school. Out school have been donated a Ferantti Pegasus computer, it filled a classroom. Even when I started University in 1976 (after a 'gap year' to earn some money), one of the machines we used there (a Data General Nova) used paper tape for some tasks. We also used 'punch cards' (with Fortran) when using the central University Computers. I think the first microprocessor development system I used (for the 6100, not a common beast it had the PDP instruction set) may have had a tape reader on it. That would have been Summer 1977, when I secured 'plum' vacation job saw me though both the 'long' vacs.


      When I started in industry (1979), paper tape was still in use on defence projects supporting older kit (although I wasn't working those myself) up until I left for change of direction in 2003 or so.

      Conversing, 8" disks came an went, as I recall a colleague observing when a youngster scoffed at paper tape. As did punch cards and various other drives, zip, 3", 5.25". You still see 3.5 drives.

      That has made me feel very old....

      73
      Brian
      G8OSN/W8OSN
      www.g8osn.net
    • Rick Simpson
      In 1963 the electrical engineering department at Lehigh University got its first computer -- a Singer-Freiden LGP-30 complete with 512 bytes of drum memory.
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 24, 2013
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        In 1963 the electrical engineering department at Lehigh University got its first computer -- a Singer-Freiden LGP-30 complete with 512 bytes of drum memory. Input was by punch cards giving the absolute address and hex code for each program step. Needless to say, programs were short and debugging was long and tedious (no assembler). Later I punched paper tape on a teletype model 33 and fed it to a PDP-8.
         
        Rick
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Brian
        Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 6:18 PM
        Subject: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] Re: Poll: computing background of people starting of with the RasPi

         



        --- In Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO@yahoogroups.com, Dave Cochran <dave@...> wrote:
        >
        > What was wrong with the paper tapes? Lol


        Nothing.

        The first computer I programmed used paper tape. It also used valves (tubes). It was 1968 or so, when I was in my early years at Grammar school. Out school have been donated a Ferantti Pegasus computer, it filled a classroom. Even when I started University in 1976 (after a 'gap year' to earn some money), one of the machines we used there (a Data General Nova) used paper tape for some tasks. We also used 'punch cards' (with Fortran) when using the central University Computers. I think the first microprocessor development system I used (for the 6100, not a common beast it had the PDP instruction set) may have had a tape reader on it. That would have been Summer 1977, when I secured 'plum' vacation job saw me though both the 'long' vacs.

        When I started in industry (1979), paper tape was still in use on defence projects supporting older kit (although I wasn't working those myself) up until I left for change of direction in 2003 or so.

        Conversing, 8" disks came an went, as I recall a colleague observing when a youngster scoffed at paper tape. As did punch cards and various other drives, zip, 3", 5.25". You still see 3.5 drives.

        That has made me feel very old....

        73
        Brian
        G8OSN/W8OSN
        www.g8osn.net

      • John Ferrell
        I suppose the IBM 402 was my first computer. It was definitely solid state weighing in at about 2600 pounds with the attached carriage. No vacuum tubes or
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 27, 2013
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          I suppose the IBM 402 was my first computer. It was definitely solid
          state weighing in at about 2600 pounds with the attached carriage. No
          vacuum tubes or transistors but lots of relays. It did have "one way
          wires" that were essentially diodes (sometimes selenium rectifiers). It
          worked in decimal with mechanical counters. It was the fore runner of
          the COBOL programming language.
          I was pleasantly surprised when Slashdot led me to this article earlier
          this week:

          http://www.pcworld.com/article/249951/if_it_aint_broke_dont_fix_it_ancient_computers_in_use_today.html

          --
          John Ferrell W8CCW
          That which can be destroyed by the truth should be.
          P.C. HODGELL
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