Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

1687Re: [Raspberry_Pi_4-Ham_RADIO] framework for self-starting ham application images on Raspberry pi

Expand Messages
  • Jim Thisdale
    May 13, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Note, dos/windows (older versions at least) generally don't mount partitions after any partition it
      can't read... 1st is fat 16, 2nd is linux ext4 which windows won't mount, 3rd or more won't be
      mounted, so creating a 3rd partition for config files is probably not going to work for most windows
      users. However, there is no reason a small configuration file couldn't be added to the first (FAT16)
      partition.


      Ideas for framework of small computer board:

      Eliminate the SDcard completely and have on board flash memory, lets go for a gigabyte....

      connections for programmer?

      open source firmware/OS if possible

      include a basic http interface, much like a consumer wifi router has... with backup/load capability.

      do all configuration/loading over Ethernet.

      hit the reset button and be up and running....

      should have a few usb host slots... (sound fobs, memory stick)

      would be good to have it powered by 12-15vdc like our radios, makes for easy reliable power source.

      expansion connector for modem board(s)

      some basic led indicators. (ability to disable lights to conserve power use)

      some basic I/O would be handy:
      - few channels of A/D input say 0 - 5vdc range
      - maybe a few channels of D/A output, 0 - 5vdc?
      - microphone input
      - speaker output
      - digital inputs, +5 vdc with optional internal pull-ups to make for easy switch hookup.
      - digital outputs, +5 vdc, with optional internal pull-ups, probably open collector to ground
      suitable for radio ptt or relay sinking.
      - ???

      Any other suggestions ?

      -Jim- N1JMM, KB1YPL_B
      Visit my Pi running ircddb, dvrptr, Apache & many other things:
      http://n1jmm.no-ip.org

      On 5/13/13 5:54 PM, Kristoff Bonne wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      >
      > I am now working on the "build your own echolink node with a raspberry
      > pi" project.
      > The final goal would be to come to a system that is as easy as possible
      > to use. Something as simple as "insert a SD card in the Raspberry pi,
      > connect the cables, boot and go".
      >
      >
      > But, I guess this would not only be usefull for my project. In fact,
      > this probably applies to all "headless" applications (i.e. applications
      > that do not need user input/output via keyboard or screen) and quite a
      > number of the ham-projects are like that: D-STAR repeaters/hotspots,
      > APRS nodes, WSPR listeners, repeater controllers, APRS weather stations,
      > c2gmsk modem, etc.
      > In all these cases, we just need a radio, some butons, (in some cases)
      > an IP connection (read: ethernet) and ... a configuration file for the
      > application; but no screen or keyboard.
      >
      >
      >
      > So, would it not be usefull to create a generic framework for this, or
      > an overall document that describes how to build such a setup? This could
      > be usefull for a lot of different projects.
      >
      >
      >
      > My idea would be this:
      > - a SD card with three partitions: the two normal partitions (boot +
      > system) and an additional FAT partition.
      > - the addition partition would contain the configuration files for the
      > application involved and (perhaps) some system configurations.
      > - The diskimage can be directly copied to a SD card (as you would do to
      > install raspbian).
      > - The user would then just need to modify the files on the extra
      > partition. As it FAT formatted, it can be read on any computer that has
      > a SD card reader (even windows. :-) )
      > - Then, insert the SDcard in the pi and boot it. A startup application
      > will read and/or copy the configuration files from the FAT partition to
      > the system disk, do some preconfiguration work and then the pi can start
      > doing its thing.
      >
      >
      > I guess this would be a setup that is pretty generic for a lot of
      > different applications.
      >
      >
      > Concerning the preconfiguration scripts, most of them would be pretty
      > specific for the application, but there are some that might be generic
      > and reusable. (I'm thinking of scripts to configure a fixed ip-address
      > on a pi; which is pretty important if you have an application that
      > depends on portforwarding on the router).
      >
      >
      >
      > Any ideas of comments? Is there who already has experience with this?
      > Any pointers to existing documentation on how to do this?
      >
      >
      >
      > 73
      > kristoff - ON1ARF
    • Show all 17 messages in this topic