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Re: [RTrak] Re: RTrak-HAB antenna thoughts

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  • Tom Hayward
    ... The fanciest digipeater filtering I m aware of is hop-limiting, where the digipeater will ignore hope requests with numbers greater than 3 (or whatever the
    Message 1 of 36 , Sep 6 9:50 AM
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      On Thu, Sep 6, 2012 at 10:11 AM, airsix73 <ben.messinger@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks James & Jason,
      > Here is a cut and paste of a packet (pulled from aprs.fi)
      >
      > 2012-09-01 18:32:09 UTC:
      > KC7PUC-1>APOTC1,WIDE2-1,qAR,KF7VZR-1:!4632.56N/11931.92WO322/019/A=124524
      > 07.4 13C M&M Space Prog.
      >
      > So "WIDE2-1" should have been a good 1-hop path, right? Thank you for
      > correcting me on that as well as the repeater/digipeater slip up. I did
      > notice right from the get-go aprs.fi was flagging it with a path warning due
      > to the path/altitude combination (even at very low altitude). Are
      > digipeaters filtering out packets they think have a bad path?

      The fanciest digipeater filtering I'm aware of is hop-limiting, where
      the digipeater will ignore hope requests with numbers greater than 3
      (or whatever the owner has configured). Your path of WIDE2-1 would not
      be caught by that. I'm not aware of any digipeater software that can
      read and act on an altitude limit.

      My question is, why are you concerned about digipeaters if you found
      that you could receive it direct the whole time? This tells me that
      the best path to use next time is no path.

      Tom KD7LXL
    • Keith VE7GDH
      Ben KF7VZR (got that from a June 22 message) wrote... ... Deviation is important. If it s too high (within limits) nearby stations may still be able to decode
      Message 36 of 36 , Sep 6 2:35 PM
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        Ben KF7VZR (got that from a June 22 message) wrote...

        > My documentation says nothing about TX audio level...
        > They've both been played with...

        Deviation is important. If it's too high (within limits) nearby stations
        may still be able to decode the tones. Distant ones where your signal
        is weaker may not be able to. You have probably heard this on a voice
        repeater or even on simplex. A distant and noisy station can be copied
        via a repeater if he backs off from the mic. If he starts shouting, the
        deviation goes up. More energy is outside the passband of the receiver
        and eventually the signal is too noisy to copy or the squelch might
        even close. If you are simplex, you can try opening your squelch. If
        you are on a repeater, you're out of luck. It's the same with packet.
        You are better off having the deviation set properly. It can be done
        by ear, but a deviation meter or service monitor would be better.
        Lacking one, just crank the deviation all of the way up and then
        start turning it down. When it starts to sound quieter, turn it down
        some more. It will get you in the ballpark, but checking the actual
        deviation would be better.

        Perhaps you could check the actual deviation before you change
        anything. So... could over-deviation explain why only one iGate
        heard you?

        73 es cul - Keith VE7GDH
        --
        "I may be lost, but I know exactly where I am!"
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