Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Psalms 104:9

Expand Messages
  • Richard Deem
    I would like to get back to the scriptures, since I think that there are many areas in which we can agree if we really examine the issues from the Bible. I
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      I would like to get back to the scriptures, since I think that there are
      many areas in which we can agree if we really examine the issues from the
      Bible.

      I never got a consensus on the interpretation of Psalms 104:9. Alexis
      implied that it was referring to the waters of the flood, whereas all the
      commentaries I could find tied it to the original creation.

      What do YEC do with this verse? Danny? Kurt?

      I am getting almost no feedback to my questions about scripture. I have a
      lot more to go over, but if nobody is willing to respond, what's the point?
      Are YEC afraid of the scriptures?

      Rich

      --
      The parallels between Psalms 104 and Genesis 1 are obvious!

      Psa 104:2 He wraps himself in light as with a garment; he stretches out the
      heavens like a tent (Gen 1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and
      the earth. Gen 1:3 And God said, "Let there be light," and there was
      light.)
      Psa 104:3 and lays the beams of his upper chambers on their waters. He
      makes the clouds his chariot and rides on the wings of the wind. (Gen 1:7
      So God made the expanse and separated the water under the expanse from the
      water above it. And it was so.)
      Psa 104:4 He makes winds his messengers, flames of fire his servants.
      Psa 104:5 He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be moved.
      Psa 104:6 You covered it with the deep as with a garment; the waters stood
      above the mountains.(Gen 1:2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness
      was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over
      the waters.)
      Psa 104:7 But at your rebuke the waters fled, at the sound of your thunder
      they took to flight; (Gen 1:9 And God said, "Let the water under the sky be
      gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear." And it was so.)
      Psa 104:8 they flowed over the mountains, they went down into the valleys,
      to the place you assigned for them. (Gen 1:10 God called the dry ground
      "land," and the gathered waters he called "seas." And God saw that it was
      good.)
      Psa 104:9 You set a boundary they cannot cross; never again will they cover
      the earth.

      I am not the first person to notice the parallels between Psalms 104 and
      Genesis 1. Take a look at the following commentaries. They all say that the
      beginning of Psalms 104 is referring to Genesis 1! Maybe all these people
      are wrong and you are right?

      John Wesley's interpretation of Psalms 104
      http://www.studylight.org/com/wen/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=104
      CLARKE'S COMMENTARY - PSALMS 104
      http://www.godrules.net/index.html?http://www.godrules.net/library/topics/to
      pic441.htm&2
      Matthew Henry's Commentary
      http://www.htmlbible.com/kjv30/henry/H19C104.htm
    • Jonathan
      Rich, I think answers were given regarding Ps. 104. You just don t not like them. I don t think anyone has a fear of scripture on this point (albeit, some
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 3, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Rich,

        I think answers were given regarding Ps. 104. You just don't not
        like them. I don't think anyone has a fear of scripture on this
        point (albeit, some perhaps may have a fear of man). if is the Flood
        you wnat to know about, I think we need to deal with the Historical
        record of the Flood in Genesis 6-9 (3 chapters written in clear
        historical narrative format) that tells us about the nature of the
        Flood being global and not local.

        Consider the following thoughts: Rossites think the Flood of Noah day
        was only a local event, confined to somewhere around Mesopotamia.
        This idea comes NOT from Genesis, but from the notion of 'billions of
        years' of earth history forced into the text.

        However look at the problems this compromised concept involves:

        If the Flood was local, why did Noah have to build an Ark? He could
        have walked to the other side of the mountains and missed it.

        If the Flood was local, why did God send the animals to the Ark so
        they would escape death? There would have been other animals to
        reproduce that kind if these particular ones had died.

        If the Flood was local, why was the Ark big enough to hold all kinds
        of land vertebrate animals that have ever existed? If only
        Mesopotamian animals were aboard, the Ark could have been much
        smaller.1

        If the Flood was local, why would birds have been sent on board?
        These could simply have winged across to a nearby mountain range.

        If the Flood was local, how could the waters rise to 15 cubits (8
        metres) above the mountains (Genesis 7:20)? Water seeks its own
        level. It couldn't rise to cover the local mountains while leaving
        the rest of the world untouched.2

        If the Flood was local, people who did not happen to be living in the
        vicinity would not be affected by it. They would have escaped God's
        judgment on sin.3 If this happened, what did Christ mean when He
        likened the coming judgment of all men to the judgment of 'all' men
        (Matthew 24:37–39) in the days of Noah? A partial judgment in Noah's
        day means a partial judgment to come.

        If the Flood was local, God would have repeatedly broken His promise
        never to send such a flood again.

        Belief in a world-wide Flood, as Scripture clearly indicates, has the
        backing of common sense, science, and Christ Himself.

        FOLKS Please SEE:
        http://www.christiananswers.net/q-eden/edn-c005.html
        Does the Bible really claim that the Flood covered the ENTIRE Earth?
        "Nine Biblical Evidences that the Flood was Global"


        --- In RTB_Discussion_Group@y..., "Richard Deem" <rich@G...> wrote:
        > I would like to get back to the scriptures, since I think that
        there are
        > many areas in which we can agree if we really examine the issues
        from the
        > Bible.
        >
        > I never got a consensus on the interpretation of Psalms 104:9.
        Alexis
        > implied that it was referring to the waters of the flood, whereas
        all the
        > commentaries I could find tied it to the original creation.
        >
        > What do YEC do with this verse? Danny? Kurt?
        >
        > I am getting almost no feedback to my questions about scripture. I
        have a
        > lot more to go over, but if nobody is willing to respond, what's
        the point?
        > Are YEC afraid of the scriptures?
        >
        > Rich
        >
        > --
        > The parallels between Psalms 104 and Genesis 1 are obvious!
        >
        > Psa 104:2 He wraps himself in light as with a garment; he
        stretches out the
        > heavens like a tent (Gen 1:1 In the beginning God created the
        heavens and
        > the earth. Gen 1:3 And God said, "Let there be light," and there
        was
        > light.)
        > Psa 104:3 and lays the beams of his upper chambers on their
        waters. He
        > makes the clouds his chariot and rides on the wings of the wind.
        (Gen 1:7
        > So God made the expanse and separated the water under the expanse
        from the
        > water above it. And it was so.)
        > Psa 104:4 He makes winds his messengers, flames of fire his
        servants.
        > Psa 104:5 He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be
        moved.
        > Psa 104:6 You covered it with the deep as with a garment; the
        waters stood
        > above the mountains.(Gen 1:2 Now the earth was formless and empty,
        darkness
        > was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was
        hovering over
        > the waters.)
        > Psa 104:7 But at your rebuke the waters fled, at the sound of your
        thunder
        > they took to flight; (Gen 1:9 And God said, "Let the water under
        the sky be
        > gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear." And it was so.)
        > Psa 104:8 they flowed over the mountains, they went down into the
        valleys,
        > to the place you assigned for them. (Gen 1:10 God called the dry
        ground
        > "land," and the gathered waters he called "seas." And God saw that
        it was
        > good.)
        > Psa 104:9 You set a boundary they cannot cross; never again will
        they cover
        > the earth.
        >
        > I am not the first person to notice the parallels between Psalms
        104 and
        > Genesis 1. Take a look at the following commentaries. They all say
        that the
        > beginning of Psalms 104 is referring to Genesis 1! Maybe all these
        people
        > are wrong and you are right?
        >
        > John Wesley's interpretation of Psalms 104
        > http://www.studylight.org/com/wen/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=104
        > CLARKE'S COMMENTARY - PSALMS 104
        > http://www.godrules.net/index.html?
        http://www.godrules.net/library/topics/to
        > pic441.htm&2
        > Matthew Henry's Commentary
        > http://www.htmlbible.com/kjv30/henry/H19C104.htm
      • archomai
        ... Flood ... day ... of ... kinds ... the ... Noah s ... promise ... the ... I ... empty, ... your ... the ... that ... say ... these
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 5, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In RTB_Discussion_Group@y..., "Jonathan" <x-evolutionist@m...>
          wrote:

          > Rich,
          >
          > I think answers were given regarding Ps. 104. You just don't not
          > like them. I don't think anyone has a fear of scripture on this
          > point (albeit, some perhaps may have a fear of man). if is the
          Flood
          > you wnat to know about, I think we need to deal with the Historical
          > record of the Flood in Genesis 6-9 (3 chapters written in clear
          > historical narrative format) that tells us about the nature of the
          > Flood being global and not local.
          >
          > Consider the following thoughts: Rossites think the Flood of Noah
          day
          > was only a local event, confined to somewhere around Mesopotamia.
          > This idea comes NOT from Genesis, but from the notion of 'billions
          of
          > years' of earth history forced into the text.
          >
          > However look at the problems this compromised concept involves:
          >
          > If the Flood was local, why did Noah have to build an Ark? He could
          > have walked to the other side of the mountains and missed it.
          >
          > If the Flood was local, why did God send the animals to the Ark so
          > they would escape ? There would have been other animals to
          > reproduce that kind if these particular ones had died.
          >
          > If the Flood was local, why was the Ark big enough to hold all
          kinds
          > of land vertebrate animals that have ever existed? If only
          > Mesopotamian animals were aboard, the Ark could have been much
          > smaller.1
          >
          > If the Flood was local, why would birds have been sent on board?
          > These could simply have winged across to a nearby mountain range.
          >
          > If the Flood was local, how could the waters rise to 15 cubits (8
          > metres) above the mountains (Genesis 7:20)? Water seeks its own
          > level. It couldn't rise to cover the local mountains while leaving
          > the rest of the world untouched.2
          >
          > If the Flood was local, people who did not happen to be living in
          the
          > vicinity would not be affected by it. They would have escaped God's
          > judgment on sin.3 If this happened, what did Christ mean when He
          > likened the coming judgment of all men to the judgment of 'all' men
          > (Matthew 24:37–39) in the days of Noah? A partial judgment in
          Noah's
          > day means a partial judgment to come.
          >
          > If the Flood was local, God would have repeatedly broken His
          promise
          > never to send such a flood again.
          >
          > Belief in a world-wide Flood, as Scripture clearly indicates, has
          the
          > backing of common sense, science, and Christ Himself.
          >
          > FOLKS Please SEE:
          > http://www.christiananswers.net/q-eden/edn-c005.html
          > Does the Bible really claim that the Flood covered the ENTIRE Earth?
          > "Nine Biblical Evidences that the Flood was Global"
          >
          >
          > --- In RTB_Discussion_Group@y..., "Richard Deem" <rich@G...> wrote:
          > > I would like to get back to the scriptures, since I think that
          > there are
          > > many areas in which we can agree if we really examine the issues
          > from the
          > > Bible.
          > >
          > > I never got a consensus on the interpretation of Psalms 104:9.
          > Alexis
          > > implied that it was referring to the waters of the flood, whereas
          > all the
          > > commentaries I could find tied it to the original creation.
          > >
          > > What do YEC do with this verse? Danny? Kurt?
          > >
          > > I am getting almost no feedback to my questions about scripture.
          I
          > have a
          > > lot more to go over, but if nobody is willing to respond, what's
          > the point?
          > > Are YEC afraid of the scriptures?
          > >
          > > Rich
          > >
          > > --
          > > The parallels between Psalms 104 and Genesis 1 are obvious!
          > >
          > > Psa 104:2 He wraps himself in light as with a garment; he
          > stretches out the
          > > heavens like a tent (Gen 1:1 In the beginning God created the
          > heavens and
          > > the earth. Gen 1:3 And God said, "Let there be light," and there
          > was
          > > light.)
          > > Psa 104:3 and lays the beams of his upper chambers on their
          > waters. He
          > > makes the clouds his chariot and rides on the wings of the wind.
          > (Gen 1:7
          > > So God made the expanse and separated the water under the expanse
          > from the
          > > water above it. And it was so.)
          > > Psa 104:4 He makes winds his messengers, flames of fire his
          > servants.
          > > Psa 104:5 He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be
          > moved.
          > > Psa 104:6 You covered it with the deep as with a garment; the
          > waters stood
          > > above the mountains.(Gen 1:2 Now the earth was formless and
          empty,
          > darkness
          > > was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was
          > hovering over
          > > the waters.)
          > > Psa 104:7 But at your rebuke the waters fled, at the sound of
          your
          > thunder
          > > they took to flight; (Gen 1:9 And God said, "Let the water under
          > the sky be
          > > gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear." And it was so.)
          > > Psa 104:8 they flowed over the mountains, they went down into
          the
          > valleys,
          > > to the place you assigned for them. (Gen 1:10 God called the dry
          > ground
          > > "land," and the gathered waters he called "seas." And God saw
          that
          > it was
          > > good.)
          > > Psa 104:9 You set a boundary they cannot cross; never again will
          > they cover
          > > the earth.
          > >
          > > I am not the first person to notice the parallels between Psalms
          > 104 and
          > > Genesis 1. Take a look at the following commentaries. They all
          say
          > that the
          > > beginning of Psalms 104 is referring to Genesis 1! Maybe all
          these
          > people
          > > are wrong and you are right?
          > >
          > > John Wesley's interpretation of Psalms 104
          > > http://www.studylight.org/com/wen/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=104
          > > CLARKE'S COMMENTARY - PSALMS 104
          > > http://www.godrules.net/index.html?
          > http://www.godrules.net/library/topics/to
          > > pic441.htm&2
          > > Matthew Henry's Commentary
          > > http://www.htmlbible.com/kjv30/henry/H19C104.htm
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.