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Re: e-wrap & knitting

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  • Lynn Carpenter
    ... I think you inadvertently touched a very, very sore nerve. Many people have picked up Knifty Knitters after literally years of struggling to knit with
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 1 4:28 PM
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      "meilynne" <meilynne@...> wrote:
      >
      >By posting this same message in a Knifty Knitter group, I got
      >blasted by got a huge wave of anger from members who thought I was
      >demeaning the art of looming. I do not think that looming is fake,
      >and I give it as much artistic crediblity as any other method of
      >turning yarn into fabric.

      I think you inadvertently touched a very, very sore nerve. Many people
      have picked up Knifty Knitters after literally years of struggling to knit
      with needles, and are delighted to find that they "can, too, knit!" So to
      be told "e-wrap is not really knitting" is a repeat of a slam that they've
      been hurt by before.

      And to be truthful, I would say that while e-wrap does have the yarn
      crossing at the bottom of the loop, a textile researcher looking at an
      e-wrapped fabric would label it "knitting".

      Mary Thomas, in "Mary Thomas's Knitting Book", calls e-wrap "Knit Stitch -
      Crossed" (pages 53 and 54). The "Reader's Digest Complete Guide to
      Needlework" calls it "the twisted stitch". ("Variations on elementary
      stitch patterns", page 281.) Therese de Dillmont, in my 1955 copy of the
      "Encyclopedia of Needlework" calls this "knitting into the back of the
      stitch".

      With such a wide variety of knitting books that call "e-wrap" knitting, I
      feel pretty safe also calling it knitting.

      Lynn Carpenter in SW Michigan, USA
      alwen at i2k dot com
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