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Beginning a hat!!

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  • Wolf Walker
    After two false starts and spending time debating untangling the mess I made or just snipping it, I think I m getting the hang of it. Problems I encountered.
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 18, 2004
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      After two false starts and spending time debating
      untangling the mess I made or just snipping it, I
      think I'm getting the hang of it.

      Problems I encountered.

      My right hand pinkie keeps getting stuck between the
      pegs and each time I try to take it out the same way
      it went in, my knuckle gets stuck.

      I really need a third hand at the moment . . . my
      stitching is still tight -- use to crocheting -- and
      I'm to the point of actually using my foot to hold it
      in place while I complete the take it off stage.

      I don't know the terms of what the heck I'm
      doing...roundloom, pick, pegs, am I knit one pearl
      two-ing?

      I had to get away from it for a moment and try to
      relax a little. I started out relaxed, leaning back on
      the couch and ended up hunched over the thing and
      about as tightly wound as the stitches I was
      attempting to pry from the pegs.


      Anyway, I think it's going good. <optimist at play
      here>. When I get to the end of the hat, how do I end
      it? I mean take it off the loom? Or am I doomed to
      continue this one long peice until I run out of yarn.
      And if I run out of yarn in the middle of the hat, how
      do I add the next skein?

      I'm gonna be a nervous wreck before I get it done.

      BUT, on the bright side, I did take a photo of the
      little bit I got done. I'll stick it in the photo
      section under Del.


      Del



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    • Hathaway Shoshana
      Kelly, welcome to looming, and to the list. There are 2 methods you can use to remove a scarf. I tend to use the open removal method, which gives you a tube
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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        Kelly, welcome to looming, and to the list.

        There are 2 methods you can use to remove a scarf. I tend to use the open
        removal method, which gives you a tube (or are you doing a flat piece?) with
        the ends open. All you do is:
        When you have made you last row, you will have (depending on the stitch you
        use) 2 loops on your loom. Lift the bottom loop(s) over the top loop so
        that you have only one loop on each peg. Now, working from the end where
        your working yarn is, wrap a loop around a crochet hook. Remove the first 2
        loops from the first 2 pegs and put them on you hook. Bring the back loop
        over the front (the loop nearest the hook). Now make a chain stitch. Take
        the nest loop off the loom and on to the hook, yarn over. Repeat until you
        have 1 loop remaining Cut your yarn, carefully remove last loop, pull it
        out a bit, run the end of your yarn through it and pull tight, then weave in
        ends.

        You can also gather both ends by running a piece of yarn through the
        stitches on the loom removing the stitches (on the yarn) from the loom and
        pulling tight, then securing and weaving ends, then going to the other end
        of the scarf, run a piece of yarn through the end stitches and gathering
        them, then weaving in ends.

        Hope this helps,
        Shoshana
      • Hathaway Shoshana
        Well, Del, first things first. I had the exact problem you are ...I was a crocheter and I kept trying to achieve the same tension. So, first rule of thumb
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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          Well, Del, first things first. I had the exact problem you are ...I was a
          crocheter and I kept trying to achieve the same tension. So, first rule of
          thumb ...if it doesn't feel too loose when you're winding the loom, it's too
          tight. You don't really *wrap* the loom, you just guide the thread gently
          around the pegs.

          Another thing I found that helped tremendously was holding the loom edge on
          to my lap, so that it looks like a wheel. Then I wrapped toward me, turning
          the loom with the left hand and wrapping with the right. Not sure how you
          got your fingers between the pegs ...never did that one ...but, believe it
          not, once you get the rhythm and the tension down, it will feel like second
          nature. That took about, um, 3 weeks for me ...and we don't even want to
          discuss my first hat, LOL!

          As to removing it, there are a couple of ways, which we can talk about when
          you get to that point.

          For more help, try going to:

          www.knittingboard.com
          and
          www.decoraccentsinc.com

          Both sites have excellent instructions and mini movies that show you what to
          do.

          Shoshana;na
        • TIMOTHY GRIMES
          I have a round and a flat loom I would like know if there are a different type of stitch or stitches that can be used ... From: Hathaway
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 20, 2004
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            I have a round and a flat loom I would like know if there are a different type of stitch or stitches that can be used
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 7:09 PM
            Subject: Re: [ROUNDLOOMS] Beginning a hat!!


            Well, Del, first things first.  I had the exact problem you are ...I was a
            crocheter and I kept trying to achieve the same tension.  So, first rule of
            thumb ...if it doesn't feel too loose when you're winding the loom, it's too
            tight.  You don't really *wrap* the loom, you just guide the thread gently
            around the pegs.

            Another thing I found that helped tremendously was holding the loom edge on
            to my lap, so that it looks like a wheel.  Then I wrapped toward me, turning
            the loom with the left hand and wrapping with the right.  Not sure how you
            got your fingers between the pegs ...never did that one ...but, believe it
            not, once you get the rhythm and the tension down, it will feel like second
            nature.  That took about, um, 3 weeks for me ...and we don't even want to
            discuss my first hat, LOL!

            As to removing it, there are a couple of ways, which we can talk about when
            you get to that point.

            For more help, try going to:

            www.knittingboard.com
            and
            www.decoraccentsinc.com

            Both sites have excellent instructions and mini movies that show you what to
            do.

            Shoshana;na






          • Cindy Curell
            Hi! My name is Cindy and I am new to looming as well. I have a question --How do I keep the edges of my scarf that I knit on a round loom from rolling
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 20, 2004
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              Hi!  My name is Cindy and I am new to "looming"as well.  I have a question --How do I keep the edges of my scarf that I knit on a round loom from rolling towards the center.  I want to be able to do this on a round loom, but every time I try, the edges roll to the center and boy is that frustrating.  Thanks for any help you can give.
               
              Cindy
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Kelly
              Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 8:47 PM
              Subject: [ROUNDLOOMS] Help! I'm new with a question!


              Hello all!  My name is Kelly and I'm 36 years old.  I live in Maryland
              and have formed an instant addiction to knitting on looms!
              I was so excited to find this group yesterday after purchasing my
              first set of round looms.  I've already completed three hats (boy
              those things go fast!) and am working on a scarf, but I have a
              question.  How do I get it off of the loom and finish the end so it
              won't unravel?  I'm clueless!
              Thanks in advance for any help with this, and I look forward to
              sharing with others who have been bitten by the loom knitting bug like
              me!

              Kelly




            • Carolyn Ranker
              Cindy, If you knit one row, purl one row, or knit a few stitches and purl a few stitches, it really keeps it from curling. Also, you can crochet around the
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 20, 2004
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                Cindy,
                If you knit one row, purl one row, or knit a few stitches and purl a few stitches, it really keeps it from curling.  Also, you can crochet around the scarf when it's done.
                Carolyn
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, December 20, 2004 11:05 PM
                Subject: Re: [ROUNDLOOMS] Help! I'm new with a question!

                Hi!  My name is Cindy and I am new to "looming"as well.  I have a question --How do I keep the edges of my scarf that I knit on a round loom from rolling towards the center.  I want to be able to do this on a round loom, but every time I try, the edges roll to the center and boy is that frustrating.  Thanks for any help you can give.
                 
                Cindy
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Kelly
                Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 8:47 PM
                Subject: [ROUNDLOOMS] Help! I'm new with a question!


                Hello all!  My name is Kelly and I'm 36 years old.  I live in Maryland
                and have formed an instant addiction to knitting on looms!
                I was so excited to find this group yesterday after purchasing my
                first set of round looms.  I've already completed three hats (boy
                those things go fast!) and am working on a scarf, but I have a
                question.  How do I get it off of the loom and finish the end so it
                won't unravel?  I'm clueless!
                Thanks in advance for any help with this, and I look forward to
                sharing with others who have been bitten by the loom knitting bug like
                me!

                Kelly





              • Hathaway Shoshana
                Cindy, there are a couple of ways to handle the curling sides. I like to do a row or 2 of crochet around the entire scarf when it s off the loom, which adds
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 20, 2004
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                  Cindy, there are a couple of ways to handle the curling sides. I like to do
                  a row or 2 of crochet around the entire scarf when it's off the loom, which
                  adds flair to the finished product, and takes care of the curl. You can
                  also purl the final couple of stitches on each row, or rather, the first 2
                  or so and the last 2 or stitches, or you can knit one row, and do the purls
                  on the next row as described above. Until you learn to purl, though, the
                  crochet trim is best.

                  Also, I rather expect that you could dampen the finished scarf and block it
                  by laying it flat and covering it with a towel then putting something heavy
                  on it, although if it's a long scarf, that could take up a fair amount of
                  space.

                  But you aren't doing anything wrong ...flat pieces on round looms do that,
                  unless you work in garter stitch which, on a loom is knit one row, purl one
                  row.

                  Shoshana
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