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How to know how many pegs per project...and more

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  • loombee
    Not sure where I got this... Re: knitting... I found this formula: The knitting on the pegs is stretched tightly. When the knitting is removed from the pegs,
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 31, 2006
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      Not sure where I got this...
      Re: knitting...
      I found this formula:

      "The knitting on the pegs is stretched tightly. When the knitting
      is removed from the pegs, the yarn relaxes and the knitting
      becomes smaller and denser.

      For example, using 8 pegs measures 3 inches wide and you want to
      make a hat that is 24 inches in diameter.

      You divide the width of your sample [3 inches] by the number of
      pegs used to make that 3" sample [8 pegs].

      In this sample, the snswer is .375. Let's call this number the
      Peg
      to "Inches of Knitting Ratio"

      This means that we are knitting on one peg to get .375 inches of
      finished knitting. If you want a hat that is 24 inches around,
      you
      need to knit on 64 pegs.

      You get this number by dividing the diameter of your project [a
      24
      inch hat in this example]. 24 inches divided by .375 inches is 64
      -- the number of pegs you will need for your project."
      ------------------------------------------------------

      HERE IS ANOTHER THING I FOUND:

      To create a project one size smaller than the loom is designed
      for: You can craft items slightly smaller than the size of the
      loom by skipping 4-8 pegs on the loom "equilaterly."

      To size down one inch: you need to skip "8" pegs - 1 peg each at
      the North, South, East, & West compass positions on the loom.

      To size down 2 inches: Skip "8" pegs - 1 peg each at the North,
      Northesat, East, Southeast, South, Southwest, West, & Northwest
      compass points on the loom.

      At the completion of the project, stretch the project lengthwise
      and then width wise, to set the stitches. This will take up any
      loose stitching caused by skipped pegs.

      To decrease the size dramatically, skip every other peg around
      the
      loom, throughout the project.

      If you loom has an odd number of pegs: At your starting position,
      designate 2 pegs together to be used throughout the project.
      Warm Regards,
      Loom Bee
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