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National "Tea Parties" and "Town Hall Meetings" are proving a boon to GOP

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  • Nasir Muhammad
    Cornyn: Public anger on healthcare a good opportunity for GOP By Reid Wilson Posted: 08/05/09 05:34 PM [ET] Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) claims the anger shown
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 6, 2009
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      Cornyn: Public anger on healthcare a good opportunity for GOP
      By Reid Wilson
      Posted: 08/05/09 05:34 PM [ET]
      Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) claims the anger shown by demonstrators at town hall meetings across the country will make his job of electing GOP senators all the more easy.

      Several Democratic lawmakers, back in their districts for August recess, have had events disrupted by protesters on healthcare reform.

      Democrats say House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) and other Republicans are encouraging the protests, while Republicans accuse Democrats of seeking to silence legitimate opposition by highlighting a few extreme examples.

      "Despite the headline-grabbing nature of these angry mobs and their disruptions of events, they are not reflective of where the American people are on the issues," Democratic National Committee (DNC) spokesman Brad Woodhouse said Tuesday.

      The DNC released an online video Wednesday claiming that Republicans "have no plan for moving our country forward, so they've called out the mob."

      But Cornyn, the head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), defended the protesters.

      "They're American citizens exercising their First Amendment rights. I don't know of any reason to try to demonize them," he said Wednesday.

      And he insinuated that the anger at Democrats is part of the natural process for a Republican Party that had to drag itself off the mat after the 2008 elections.

      "Fear, I would say, precedes anger, and I think there are a lot of people who tell me they are scared of what they see coming out of Washington in terms of spending and the debt and muscular federal intervention on everything from financial institutions to healthcare," Cornyn said. "It's almost like a part of the grieving process."

      What's more, he said, disappointment — whether driven by fear, anger or any other emotion — with the Democratic agenda has given Republicans a better platform from which to launch their assault on the Democratic majority in the Senate.

      "No one would have ever thought six months ago we would be where we are today. I see real opportunities for us," Cornyn said at a meeting with reporters. "2010 did not look like it was going to be a particularly friendly year for us."

      Cornyn said the GOP would "continue to offer solutions" to problems facing the nation's economy, but he said he thinks unemployment is likely to "get worse before it gets better."

      Though seven Republican senators have said they will retire at the end of the 111th Congress, Cornyn said the GOP is well-positioned in states where it initially was worried.

      In Ohio, Republicans have coalesced behind former Rep. Rob Portman as Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher and Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner fight for the Democratic nomination.

      In Kentucky, Secretary of State Trey Grayson is the early Republican favorite while Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo and Attorney General Jack Conway already have the long knives out on the other side of the aisle.

      Even in Missouri, New Hampshire and Florida, where conservative resistance to favored Republican candidates — Rep. Roy Blunt, ex-Attorney General Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Charlie Crist, respectively — has bubbled to the surface, Republicans have recruited strong candidates for three of their open seats.

      Along with the competitive Democratic primaries in some states, the White House has a spotty track record on picking candidates to run for office, Cornyn noted.

      "While we've had, I think, good successes in candidate recruitment, the Democrats have had some notable failures," he said, pointing to Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan (D) and North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (D), both of whom declined Democratic entreaties to get into Senate contests.

      But Cornyn acknowledged there are some states where recruiting has not gone as well as the GOP hoped. Even with dismal poll numbers, Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) has yet to attract a major challenger. With similarly low approval ratings, Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) will face the winner of a crowded Republican field.

      "The Republican strategy of stopping every effort to fix the economy and stopping every effort to lower healthcare costs shows that not only have they not learned any lessons from past elections, but also that they may be a bit presumptuous to start singing `Happy Days are Here Again,' " Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee spokesman Eric Schultz said.

      Despite an NRSC-sponsored poll that showed Gov. John Hoeven (R) easily beating Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Cornyn has not been able to convince the popular three-term governor to get in the race.

      And though Republicans have touted former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina (R) as a credible candidate against Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), the GOP has yet to attract anything passing for a credible candidate against Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.) or Russ Feingold (D-Wis.).
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    • DGHarrison
      I object to the characterization of concerned citizens as being a mob. In Minnesota, the questions were presented in a very civil manner to Rep. Keith Ellison
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 6, 2009
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        I object to the characterization of concerned citizens as being a mob.
        In Minnesota, the questions were presented in a very civil manner to
        Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN 5th CD). There were many who applauded those
        who opposed ObamaCare and few to none applauding those supporting
        ObamaCare. There was no mob. There were no rioters. There was no
        disrespect or disturbance of the peace. I don't know what others might
        have experienced around the nation, but anyone claiming that we are
        shills for the insurance and drug companies is lying. See for yourself:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8VU_dS_3OU

        Doug Harrison
        Minnesota


        > Cornyn: Public anger on healthcare a good opportunity for GOP
        > By Reid Wilson
        > Posted: 08/05/09 05:34 PM [ET]
        > Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) claims the anger shown by demonstrators at town hall meetings across the country will make his job of electing GOP senators all the more easy.
        >
        > Several Democratic lawmakers, back in their districts for August recess, have had events disrupted by protesters on healthcare reform.
        >
        > Democrats say House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) and other Republicans are encouraging the protests, while Republicans accuse Democrats of seeking to silence legitimate opposition by highlighting a few extreme examples.
        >
        > "Despite the headline-grabbing nature of these angry mobs and their disruptions of events, they are not reflective of where the American people are on the issues," Democratic National Committee (DNC) spokesman Brad Woodhouse said Tuesday.
        >
        > The DNC released an online video Wednesday claiming that Republicans "have no plan for moving our country forward, so they've called out the mob."
        >
        > But Cornyn, the head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), defended the protesters.
        >
        > "They're American citizens exercising their First Amendment rights. I don't know of any reason to try to demonize them," he said Wednesday.
        >
        > And he insinuated that the anger at Democrats is part of the natural process for a Republican Party that had to drag itself off the mat after the 2008 elections.
        >
        > "Fear, I would say, precedes anger, and I think there are a lot of people who tell me they are scared of what they see coming out of Washington in terms of spending and the debt and muscular federal intervention on everything from financial institutions to healthcare," Cornyn said. "It's almost like a part of the grieving process."
        >
        > What's more, he said, disappointment — whether driven by fear, anger or any other emotion — with the Democratic agenda has given Republicans a better platform from which to launch their assault on the Democratic majority in the Senate.
        >
        > "No one would have ever thought six months ago we would be where we are today. I see real opportunities for us," Cornyn said at a meeting with reporters. "2010 did not look like it was going to be a particularly friendly year for us."
        >
        > Cornyn said the GOP would "continue to offer solutions" to problems facing the nation's economy, but he said he thinks unemployment is likely to "get worse before it gets better."
        >
        > Though seven Republican senators have said they will retire at the end of the 111th Congress, Cornyn said the GOP is well-positioned in states where it initially was worried.
        >
        > In Ohio, Republicans have coalesced behind former Rep. Rob Portman as Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher and Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner fight for the Democratic nomination.
        >
        > In Kentucky, Secretary of State Trey Grayson is the early Republican favorite while Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo and Attorney General Jack Conway already have the long knives out on the other side of the aisle.
        >
        > Even in Missouri, New Hampshire and Florida, where conservative resistance to favored Republican candidates — Rep. Roy Blunt, ex-Attorney General Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Charlie Crist, respectively — has bubbled to the surface, Republicans have recruited strong candidates for three of their open seats.
        >
        > Along with the competitive Democratic primaries in some states, the White House has a spotty track record on picking candidates to run for office, Cornyn noted.
        >
        > "While we've had, I think, good successes in candidate recruitment, the Democrats have had some notable failures," he said, pointing to Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan (D) and North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (D), both of whom declined Democratic entreaties to get into Senate contests.
        >
        > But Cornyn acknowledged there are some states where recruiting has not gone as well as the GOP hoped. Even with dismal poll numbers, Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) has yet to attract a major challenger. With similarly low approval ratings, Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) will face the winner of a crowded Republican field.
        >
        > "The Republican strategy of stopping every effort to fix the economy and stopping every effort to lower healthcare costs shows that not only have they not learned any lessons from past elections, but also that they may be a bit presumptuous to start singing `Happy Days are Here Again,' " Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee spokesman Eric Schultz said.
        >
        > Despite an NRSC-sponsored poll that showed Gov. John Hoeven (R) easily beating Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Cornyn has not been able to convince the popular three-term governor to get in the race.
        >
        > And though Republicans have touted former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina (R) as a credible candidate against Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), the GOP has yet to attract anything passing for a credible candidate against Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.) or Russ Feingold (D-Wis.).
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