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Re: [RI_Ancestors] Scituate Reservoir ~~~ More History from the Projo

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  • Linda Peloquin
    OMG...I ve got to wear waterproof mascara and have an oxygen bottle handy when I read some of these!! How come I m never in the library when these things
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 30, 2008
      OMG...I've got to wear waterproof mascara and have an oxygen bottle handy when I read some of these!!

      How come I'm never in the library when these things happen?? that must have been a riot !! Too bad they weren't the RIGHT Indians with the High Stakes Indian Bingo cause you might be rich by now!!
      Linda

      Donald Taylor <dtaylor120@...> wrote: I remember, yes it was her and it was you that almost got us kicked out. You kept yelling "they were indians, they were indians"!
      Don

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Sheila Stewart <SLS91750@...>
      To: RI Ancestors <RI_Ancestors@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 9:30:24 PM
      Subject: Re: [RI_Ancestors] Scituate Reservoir ~~~ More History from the Projo

      Hey Don,

      Wasn¹t it Shirley Arnold who¹s mentioned in the article below that we met in
      Scituate that day you almost got me kicked out of the Scituate Library? I
      think it was. I was laughing so much at the fact I had found your Taylor
      folk were ³po white and half Indian² and lived in the middle of the Pine
      Swamp on an island. And, don¹t forget that my Harris ancestors brought the
      wool for the Taylor gals to spin while the men did nothing!! I do remember
      meeting her there. Do you remember meeting her or where you too much in
      shock? LOL

      Cuz Sheila

      On 4/30/08 11:50 AM, "Linda" <miyukichan0987@ yahoo.com> wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      > Here are a couple more articles that have appeared in the Projo
      > regarding Scituate history & Reservoir history that might new to some
      > & of interest to some of the Group with roots in Scituate.
      >
      > Reservoir dead; [Northwest Edition]
      > NEIL SHEA Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.:
      > Sep 19, 2002. pg. D.01
      >
      > ProQuest document ID: 187428571
      > Document URL:
      > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId= 77194&RQT= 30
      > 9&VName=PQD
      > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3& amp;clientId
      > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
      >
      > Full Text (836 words)
      >
      > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Sep 19, 2002
      >
      > * A dozen or more small burial plots, abandoned when the Scituate
      > Reservoir was filled, are hidden on the land around the water supply.
      >
      > * * *
      >
      > SCITUATE - The graveyards are islands of memory sinking in a sea of
      > green foliage.
      >
      > Some embrace the bones of Revolutionary War heroes. Some shelter the
      > stacked coffins of infant brothers and sisters who died during hard
      > winters.
      >
      > All are disappearing under blankets of moss, leaves and broken branches.
      >
      > There are a dozen or more small burial plots hidden in the 11,600
      > acres of forest surrounding the Scituate Reservoir. Most are filled
      > with several generations of the same family. They were abandoned when
      > the reservoir was filled in the early 1920s, drowning almost 1,000
      > houses, farms, schools, churches and stores.
      >
      > Since the reservoir was built and the land around it closed off to the
      > public, only relatives of the dead have been allowed to visit the
      > graveyards, and sometimes, be buried in them. While all of the graves
      > were carefully mapped and names of the dead recorded in state files,
      > the graveyards stand unshielded from the seasons.
      >
      > For Shirley Arnold, historian of the Scituate Preservation Society,
      > the plots are personal: several of her maternal ancestors, members of
      > the Knight family, are buried around the reservoir.
      >
      > The Knights settled in the area in 1706, 24 years before the town was
      > founded.
      >
      > One of them, Joseph Knight, became a colonel in the Continental Army,
      > commander of the second company of Scituate minutemen formed to fight
      > the British. He fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and now lies in
      > Rhode Island Historical Cemetery Number 59, under a cool forest canopy.
      >
      > In the dimly lit past, behind seven generations of Knights and as many
      > repetitions of the word great, the colonel was a grandfather of Arnold's.
      >
      > Arnold, 67, has visited his grave three times, cleaning and tidying up
      > around the plot. An official from the Providence Water Supply Board,
      > the agency that owns the land, accompanied her during each visit.
      >
      > Knight is buried beside his wife and first cousin, Elizabeth. Other
      > family members rest nearby.
      >
      > The first time Arnold visited Knight, a metal marker adorned his
      > grave. It was a proud decoration, placed there sometime in the last
      > century to announce his military service. The marker later
      > disappeared. It was taken, Arnold thinks, by a vandal, or maybe a
      > souvenir hunter.
      >
      > While Arnold has visited and tended to her relatives' plot, others go
      > unnoticed for decades.
      >
      > At Historical Cemetery No. 51, wildflowers and blueberries are the
      > only decorations.
      >
      > The cemetery lies along an old road not far from the banks of the
      > reservoir. It is surrounded by waist-high stonewalls that are thick
      > and wide, built to an old standard, without concrete. An iron gate,
      > rusted shut, seals the yard.
      >
      > There, saluted by chirping crickets and wheezing cicadas, 19 members
      > of the Battey and Page families are buried. The bloodline there begins
      > with Dr. Owen Battey, born in 1773 on the eve of the Revolution.
      >
      > Battey was a physician and also a postmaster and justice of the peace.
      > He and his wife Ruth, who is buried beside him, had 10 children.
      >
      > In a nearby grave, three of them are buried together. None lived much
      > longer than a year. The briefest life etched into the faded marble
      > stone belonged to Sarah Battey, who died in December 1817, 11 days
      > old. Dr. Battey lived to see the start of the Civil War, and died at
      > 90 in 1862.
      >
      > Most of the headstones are gray and mottled, stained with lichens and
      > roughened by years of rain, snow and heat.
      >
      > But one stone stands out as a relatively recent addition to the yard.
      > A couple, related to the Pages and Batteys by blood and marriage, was
      > buried here in 1981 and 1982.
      >
      > Arnold said the Water Supply Board allows some relatives of the old
      > dead to be buried in family plots if they can prove ancestry.
      > Officials at the water board confirmed the practice. A water board
      > official who knew of Arnold's blood ties to her ancestor's city- owned
      > plot once good-naturedly offered her a spot.
      >
      > There's still plenty of room in there, he said.
      >
      > Arnold declined.
      >
      > Who'll visit my grave? she asked.
      >
      > As a historian, Arnold helped write a book about Scituate and its Lost
      > Villages, the towns that were inundated by the reservoir.
      >
      > She knows first hand how the enormous project disturbed lives, and
      > sometimes wrecked them she has documented eight cases where residents
      > committed suicide rather than leave their land.
      >
      > Above all, she said, history was treasured. That history was embodied
      > in the family boneyards.
      >
      > The thing that bothered people the most, if they had to move, was
      > moving their family burial plots, Arnold said. Eventually they're all
      > going to be forgotten. But I think they would have liked being left there.
      >
      > * * *
      >
      > * A GRAVE TRAIL: Richard Blodgett, environmental manager for the
      > Providence Water Supply Board, walks past a grave on land around the
      > Scituate Reservoir.
      >
      > JOURNAL PHOTO / BOB BREIDENBACH
      >
      > COMMENTARY - Scituate's deep reservoir of history; [All Edition]
      > DAVID BRUSSAT. The Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.: Aug 11, 2005.
      > pg. B.05
      >
      > ProQuest document ID: 882780351
      > Document URL:
      > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId= 77194&RQT= 30
      > 9&VName=PQD
      > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3& amp;clientId
      > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
      >
      > Full Text (837 words)
      > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Aug 11, 2005
      >
      > SCITUATE - ROMANTICS might be disappointed that the lost villages of
      > Scituate are not standing at the bottom of the Scituate Reservoir.
      > Adventurers in diving bells will not find schools of fish swimming in
      > and out of the old houses and mills of Elmdale, Glen Rock, Ashland,
      > Richmond, Kent, South Scituate or parts of Ponagansett, Harrisdale,
      > Rockland and Saundersville. Drain their watery grave and you will find
      > no Atlantis, Rhode Island-style. Sorry. Everything was demolished
      > before the flood.
      >
      > In 1915, the General Assembly created a Water Supply Board, which took
      > 23.1 of Scituate's 55 square miles by eminent domain, and then,
      > according to the Supply Board's voluminous records, tore down "1,195
      > buildings, including 375 houses, 233 barns, 7 schools, 6 churches, 6
      > mills, 30 dairy farms, 11 ice houses, 5 halls, post offices, taverns,
      > general stores, blacksmith and wheelwright shops, cider mills, two
      > fire stations, and an electric-railway system (the Providence and
      > Danielson Railroad)."
      >
      > By 1926, construction of the reservoir was complete. The northern
      > branch of the Pawtuxet River took a year to fill it up. Even when it's
      > full, the 39 billion gallons of water cover only 5.3 of the 23.1
      > square miles of the land taken by the state. The remaining 17.8 square
      > miles were designated as watershed, flooded with 7 million newly
      > planted evergreen trees, and barred to development.
      >
      > A large portion of the architecture that bit the dust between 1915 and
      > 1926 was not in the area submerged in water, but on land protected to
      > keep the water pure. Just imagine seeing your house demolished, yet
      > the land on which it sat forever high and dry. Cleanliness may be next
      > to godliness, but, ah! the frustration!
      >
      > In 1869, half a century before that reservoir was built, Providence
      > voters agreed to build the city's first modern water- supply system.
      > Its source was the Pawtuxet River. It fed Sockanosset Reservoir, in
      > Cranston, and then flowed downhill by pipe to Providence, into the
      > Hope Reservoir, built in 1875 at Hope and Olney streets. That
      > reservoir was rendered obsolete by the Scituate Reservoir, in 1926.
      > Hope High School was built on filled land at the Hope Reservoir site,
      > in 1938.
      >
      > But aren't we getting a bit far from Scituate? Not as far as Scituate,
      > Mass., for which the town was named. Anyway, it was the rise of mills
      > on the Pawtuxet that polluted its waters, forcing Providence to dam
      > its northern leg and create the Scituate Reservoir.
      >
      > Scituate, Glocester and Smithfield - part of territory called "the
      > Providence Woods," or "the Outlands" -- were split off from Providence
      > and incorporated as towns on Feb. 20, 1730-31 (the calendar shifted
      > that year), becoming Rhode Island's 13th, 14th and 15th jurisdictions
      > (not necessarily in that order). In 1781, Foster split off from Scituate.
      >
      > On Monday, I was driven through Scituate by Shirley Arnold and Fred
      > Faria, respectively historian and former president of the Scituate
      > Preservation Society. Mr. Faria's forest-green 1970 Malibu convertible
      > was the perfect platform from which to view the town's landscapes of
      > green and blue.
      >
      > Most of the 158 historic sites listed in the Rhode Island Historical
      > Preservation & Heritage Commission's 1980 survey of Scituate were, it
      > seems to me, painted white. Of these, the most impressive is the
      > Smithville Institute, with its imposing portico, its pediment upheld
      > by four massive Ionic columns. Designed by Russell Warren, it was
      > completed about a decade after he contributed his half of the design
      > for the Providence Arcade (1828).
      >
      > Much of Scituate's 18th and 19th Century architecture clusters at the
      > crossroads of its remaining villages. The best-preserved stretches of
      > streetscape are, it seems to me, in Hope, Clayville and North
      > Scituate. Few modern structures squat in their midst to erode the
      > ambiance of history. And so far as I could tell, only one major slash
      > of crudscape has been inflicted upon the town. True, beyond the
      > village centers and the watershed, the forest is dotted with housing
      > of recent vintage, but much of it ducks behind lush roadside verdure
      > with becoming modesty.
      >
      > Indeed, so fully have woods and water replaced Scituate's old rural
      > landscapes of farmland, pasture and meadow that one could almost say
      > its historic character has not been preserved at all, but radically
      > transformed . . . Nah. Too pretty for that.
      >
      > Speaking of radical transformation, consider this headline from The
      > Providence Journal of Jan. 24, 1946: "Chopmist Hill District is Rated
      > One of Top Potential Locations for UNO Headquarters by Committee."
      > This was news to me! The United Nations in Rhode Island! Seems that
      > Scituate's highest hill was a major post in World War II for
      > electronic eavesdropping on enemy radio transmissions. Such a capacity
      > was a factor in choosing a U.N. site.
      >
      > Well, it never happened. Manhattan got the nod instead, and thankfully
      > so. Unpaid official parking tickets and low-numbered diplomat license
      > plates would've scandalized Rhode Island. Our restaurant scene might
      > have blossomed sooner, but Scituate's historic charm would've been
      > history.
      >
      > David Brussat is a member of The Journal's editorial board. His e-
      > mail is: dbrussat@projo. com <mailto:dbrussat% 40projo.com> .
      >
      > Cultivating the town's roots-; [Northwest Edition]
      > RAGHURAM VADAREVU Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal.
      > Providence, R.I.: Jan 27, 2000. pg. C.01
      >
      > ProQuest document ID: 48455593
      > Document URL:
      > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId= 77194&RQT= 309
      > &VName=PQD
      > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3& amp;clientId=
      > 77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
      >
      > Full Text (920 words)
      > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Jan 27, 2000
      >
      > * In a town where entire villages were lost to make way for a
      > reservoir, the Scituate Preservation Society has had its work cut out
      > for it as it seeks to protect the past.
      >
      > ***
      >
      > SCITUATE - It was the 1970s when a handful of residents began talking
      > about preserving the town's rapidly vanishing history.
      >
      > Old buildings were being torn down and there wasn't much information
      > on the town's history. The reservoir had long since drowned the
      > stories of the town's oldest families.
      >
      > On Sept. 17, 1975, Barbara and Carl H. Stetson Jr. mailed postcards to
      > the entire town calling for an old-fashioned town meeting.
      >
      > Young and old alike, help form the Scituate Preservation Society, the
      > postcards read, Barbara Stetson explained recently.
      >
      > Why a society? To preserve Scituate memorabilia and to provide
      > activities related to preservation and restoration, she said.
      >
      > About 100 people showed up in the junior and senior high school and 60
      > formed the group, which was named the Preservation and Heritage
      > Society of Scituate.
      >
      > This year, the group, now called the Scituate Preservation Society,
      > celebrates its 25th anniversary. It boasts membership of more than 100
      > and has helped preserve the town's rich Colonial and agricultural
      > heritage.
      >
      > The community really came together, Barbara Stetson said.
      >
      > NEARLY EVERYTHING the Preservation Society has been involved in - from
      > where the group meets at Grange 39 to the one-room school house in
      > Potterville - has been touched with history.
      >
      > The group began meeting at the North Scituate Community House, but
      > then moved in the late 1980s into Grange 39, at the corner of Gleaner
      > Chapel Road and Hartford Pike.
      >
      > Ask archivist Shirley Arnold or past president Fred Faria about the
      > Grange's history and they'll offer up dozens of interesting tidbits.
      >
      > The Grange building was first inhabited by the Wayside Gleaners, a
      > religious group that lived a simple life and went into the fields
      > after farmers' harvests to glean leftover produce so it wasn't wasted,
      > Faria said.
      >
      > The Grange, a society of farmers, took over the building in the 1930s
      > and used it as a gathering place, where they held minstrel shows,
      > suppers and regular meetings. The society moved in during the late 1980s.
      >
      > During its more than two decades in existence, the society has helped
      > restore many structures, including Grange 39. The group has received
      > about $5,000 in grants to rehabilitate the Grange in the last two years.
      >
      > The group also restored the old Potterville school, one of 19 one-
      > room schoolhouses in town, and its outhouse.
      >
      > Both structures are used for elementary school tours, Faria said, so
      > the kids can also see and understand how people had to go to the bathroom.
      >
      > In 1996, the society helped build a replica bell tower between the Old
      > Congregational Church and the North Scituate Community House. The
      > original bell from the Richmond Mill was put in the tower, Arnold said.
      >
      > Arnold and the society helped establish the Heritage Room at the North
      > Scituate Public library in 1988. The room holds many artifacts and
      > memorabilia of old Scituate.
      >
      > ONE RECENT FRIDAY, Faria and Arnold sifted through a small room at
      > Grange 39, searching for relics of old Scituate.
      >
      > Arnold leaned into a display case near a window and pulled out a
      > potato ricer that was used around 1900. Dusty books rested on the
      > shelves alongside folders and rolled-up maps.
      >
      > Faded-brown tax notices lay in another display case. In 1885, the tax
      > rate was 70 cents per $100 of property value.
      >
      > Arnold said she hopes one day to transform the Grange into a small
      > museum featuring photos and memorabilia from Scituate. She said, We
      > got our work cut out for us.
      >
      > And who better to take on the task than Arnold, whose ancestors, the
      > Knights, settled in Scituate in the 1700s.
      >
      > She picked up an old map book from 1870 by D.G. Beers & Co. It showed
      > the town the way it had been before several villages were submerged to
      > create the Scituate Reservoir.
      >
      > Arnold searched for the Knight family name on the map. Her finger ran
      > across the Burnt Hill district in the southern section of town until
      > she found them: L.S. Knight, L.A. Knight and Joseph Knight.
      >
      > Although Arnold knows her family history, there are many in town who
      > don't know the town's history.
      >
      > Faria said, We are trying to look at everything that has existed. The
      > stuff that is gone, we try to bring back. You have to keep your roots.
      > If you lose your roots, you lose your heritage.
      >
      > The 25-year-old Preservation Society will meet tonight at the Grange,
      > where members will elect new officers and cut the anniversary cake.
      >
      > Barbara Stetson, one of the founders, said, I think it will continue
      > to last a long, long time because people are interested in where they
      > live and they are wiling to participate in their heritage.
      >
      > * * *
      >
      > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
      >
      > CENTURY-OLD SOUVENIRS: Shirley Arnold, an archivist with the Scituate
      > Preservation Society, shows off a potato ricer last used around 1900
      > that was donated to the group and is now stored with other artifacts
      > at Grange 39. Below, Fred Faria, a past president of the society,
      > stands next to town tax notices dating back to 1885.
      >
      > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
      >
      > REMEMBERING THE PAST: Shirley Arnold and Fred Faria, members of the
      > Scituate Preservation Society, look through historical periodicals,
      > including a World War II-era Providence Evening Bulletin at Grange 39.
      > Below, Arnold points to where her relatives lived in the Burnt Hill
      > section of town on a 130-year-old map.
      >
      >
      >

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    • Sheila Stewart
      Linda, I never laughed so much and so hard in all my life. We were looking through some folders and Don says there is nothing on the Taylors. I pick one up and
      Message 2 of 6 , May 1, 2008
        Linda,

        I never laughed so much and so hard in all my life. We were looking through
        some folders and Don says there is nothing on the Taylors. I pick one up and
        find that bit on the ³Po White and Half Indian Taylors² and thought this is
        typical man who can¹t see right in front of his eyes! Then I started
        reading, then aloud and that was it for me. I couldn¹t stop laughing. I
        think that was why Shirley Arnold came over to us. She wanted to see what we
        were doing that was so much fun!

        But, this was several hours AFTER Don called me at 7:30 AM telling me he was
        already in Scituate, had knocked on some doors on Brandy Brook Rd. looking
        for his Taylor Lot! He woke up half the town!! He found one woman who had
        gone to the grocery store and followed her there. I was ready to kill him. I
        had NEVER met him and only chatting with him online and was going to help
        him find his Taylor Lot. So, I told him to behave, meet me at the library
        that doesn¹t open til 10 and to behave himself in the meantime! I had time
        to shower, dress, stop for coffee at Dunkin and we still had plenty of time
        to waste before the library opened. :)

        It was a fun day. We¹ll call you next time he comes to Scituate! He found
        his Taylor Lot but it is a mess. It is so sad. You¹d never know it is a
        cemetery if you were walking through the woods. All the railings are gone,
        many stones are down, and it needs a lot of work.

        So, he needs to get up here, tell us when he¹s coming and post a request for
        volunteers. We can all put out the word and bring as many as we can and as
        much heavy machinery, too! Not all can do a lot of physical work...cousin
        Jean and I will be serving coffee, donuts, etc!

        Sheila


        On 5/1/08 12:33 AM, "Linda Peloquin" <miyukichan0987@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > OMG...I've got to wear waterproof mascara and have an oxygen bottle handy
        > when I read some of these!!
        >
        > How come I'm never in the library when these things happen?? that must have
        > been a riot !! Too bad they weren't the RIGHT Indians with the High Stakes
        > Indian Bingo cause you might be rich by now!!
        > Linda
        >
        > Donald Taylor <dtaylor120@... <mailto:dtaylor120%40yahoo.com> > wrote:
        > I remember, yes it was her and it was you that almost got us kicked out. You
        > kept yelling "they were indians, they were indians"!
        > Don
        >
        > ----- Original Message ----
        > From: Sheila Stewart <SLS91750@... <mailto:SLS91750%40COX.NET> >
        > To: RI Ancestors <RI_Ancestors@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:RI_Ancestors%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 9:30:24 PM
        > Subject: Re: [RI_Ancestors] Scituate Reservoir ~~~ More History from the
        > Projo
        >
        > Hey Don,
        >
        > Wasn¹t it Shirley Arnold who¹s mentioned in the article below that we met in
        > Scituate that day you almost got me kicked out of the Scituate Library? I
        > think it was. I was laughing so much at the fact I had found your Taylor
        > folk were ³po white and half Indian² and lived in the middle of the Pine
        > Swamp on an island. And, don¹t forget that my Harris ancestors brought the
        > wool for the Taylor gals to spin while the men did nothing!! I do remember
        > meeting her there. Do you remember meeting her or where you too much in
        > shock? LOL
        >
        > Cuz Sheila
        >
        > On 4/30/08 11:50 AM, "Linda" <miyukichan0987@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > Here are a couple more articles that have appeared in the Projo
        >> > regarding Scituate history & Reservoir history that might new to some
        >> > & of interest to some of the Group with roots in Scituate.
        >> >
        >> > Reservoir dead; [Northwest Edition]
        >> > NEIL SHEA Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.:
        >> > Sep 19, 2002. pg. D.01
        >> >
        >> > ProQuest document ID: 187428571
        >> > Document URL:
        >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
        >> 77194&RQT= 30
        >> > 9&VName=PQD
        >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
        >> amp;clientId
        >> > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
        >> >
        >> > Full Text (836 words)
        >> >
        >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Sep 19, 2002
        >> >
        >> > * A dozen or more small burial plots, abandoned when the Scituate
        >> > Reservoir was filled, are hidden on the land around the water supply.
        >> >
        >> > * * *
        >> >
        >> > SCITUATE - The graveyards are islands of memory sinking in a sea of
        >> > green foliage.
        >> >
        >> > Some embrace the bones of Revolutionary War heroes. Some shelter the
        >> > stacked coffins of infant brothers and sisters who died during hard
        >> > winters.
        >> >
        >> > All are disappearing under blankets of moss, leaves and broken branches.
        >> >
        >> > There are a dozen or more small burial plots hidden in the 11,600
        >> > acres of forest surrounding the Scituate Reservoir. Most are filled
        >> > with several generations of the same family. They were abandoned when
        >> > the reservoir was filled in the early 1920s, drowning almost 1,000
        >> > houses, farms, schools, churches and stores.
        >> >
        >> > Since the reservoir was built and the land around it closed off to the
        >> > public, only relatives of the dead have been allowed to visit the
        >> > graveyards, and sometimes, be buried in them. While all of the graves
        >> > were carefully mapped and names of the dead recorded in state files,
        >> > the graveyards stand unshielded from the seasons.
        >> >
        >> > For Shirley Arnold, historian of the Scituate Preservation Society,
        >> > the plots are personal: several of her maternal ancestors, members of
        >> > the Knight family, are buried around the reservoir.
        >> >
        >> > The Knights settled in the area in 1706, 24 years before the town was
        >> > founded.
        >> >
        >> > One of them, Joseph Knight, became a colonel in the Continental Army,
        >> > commander of the second company of Scituate minutemen formed to fight
        >> > the British. He fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and now lies in
        >> > Rhode Island Historical Cemetery Number 59, under a cool forest canopy.
        >> >
        >> > In the dimly lit past, behind seven generations of Knights and as many
        >> > repetitions of the word great, the colonel was a grandfather of Arnold's.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold, 67, has visited his grave three times, cleaning and tidying up
        >> > around the plot. An official from the Providence Water Supply Board,
        >> > the agency that owns the land, accompanied her during each visit.
        >> >
        >> > Knight is buried beside his wife and first cousin, Elizabeth. Other
        >> > family members rest nearby.
        >> >
        >> > The first time Arnold visited Knight, a metal marker adorned his
        >> > grave. It was a proud decoration, placed there sometime in the last
        >> > century to announce his military service. The marker later
        >> > disappeared. It was taken, Arnold thinks, by a vandal, or maybe a
        >> > souvenir hunter.
        >> >
        >> > While Arnold has visited and tended to her relatives' plot, others go
        >> > unnoticed for decades.
        >> >
        >> > At Historical Cemetery No. 51, wildflowers and blueberries are the
        >> > only decorations.
        >> >
        >> > The cemetery lies along an old road not far from the banks of the
        >> > reservoir. It is surrounded by waist-high stonewalls that are thick
        >> > and wide, built to an old standard, without concrete. An iron gate,
        >> > rusted shut, seals the yard.
        >> >
        >> > There, saluted by chirping crickets and wheezing cicadas, 19 members
        >> > of the Battey and Page families are buried. The bloodline there begins
        >> > with Dr. Owen Battey, born in 1773 on the eve of the Revolution.
        >> >
        >> > Battey was a physician and also a postmaster and justice of the peace.
        >> > He and his wife Ruth, who is buried beside him, had 10 children.
        >> >
        >> > In a nearby grave, three of them are buried together. None lived much
        >> > longer than a year. The briefest life etched into the faded marble
        >> > stone belonged to Sarah Battey, who died in December 1817, 11 days
        >> > old. Dr. Battey lived to see the start of the Civil War, and died at
        >> > 90 in 1862.
        >> >
        >> > Most of the headstones are gray and mottled, stained with lichens and
        >> > roughened by years of rain, snow and heat.
        >> >
        >> > But one stone stands out as a relatively recent addition to the yard.
        >> > A couple, related to the Pages and Batteys by blood and marriage, was
        >> > buried here in 1981 and 1982.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold said the Water Supply Board allows some relatives of the old
        >> > dead to be buried in family plots if they can prove ancestry.
        >> > Officials at the water board confirmed the practice. A water board
        >> > official who knew of Arnold's blood ties to her ancestor's city- owned
        >> > plot once good-naturedly offered her a spot.
        >> >
        >> > There's still plenty of room in there, he said.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold declined.
        >> >
        >> > Who'll visit my grave? she asked.
        >> >
        >> > As a historian, Arnold helped write a book about Scituate and its Lost
        >> > Villages, the towns that were inundated by the reservoir.
        >> >
        >> > She knows first hand how the enormous project disturbed lives, and
        >> > sometimes wrecked them she has documented eight cases where residents
        >> > committed suicide rather than leave their land.
        >> >
        >> > Above all, she said, history was treasured. That history was embodied
        >> > in the family boneyards.
        >> >
        >> > The thing that bothered people the most, if they had to move, was
        >> > moving their family burial plots, Arnold said. Eventually they're all
        >> > going to be forgotten. But I think they would have liked being left there.
        >> >
        >> > * * *
        >> >
        >> > * A GRAVE TRAIL: Richard Blodgett, environmental manager for the
        >> > Providence Water Supply Board, walks past a grave on land around the
        >> > Scituate Reservoir.
        >> >
        >> > JOURNAL PHOTO / BOB BREIDENBACH
        >> >
        >> > COMMENTARY - Scituate's deep reservoir of history; [All Edition]
        >> > DAVID BRUSSAT. The Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.: Aug 11, 2005.
        >> > pg. B.05
        >> >
        >> > ProQuest document ID: 882780351
        >> > Document URL:
        >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
        >> 77194&RQT= 30
        >> > 9&VName=PQD
        >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
        >> amp;clientId
        >> > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
        >> >
        >> > Full Text (837 words)
        >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Aug 11, 2005
        >> >
        >> > SCITUATE - ROMANTICS might be disappointed that the lost villages of
        >> > Scituate are not standing at the bottom of the Scituate Reservoir.
        >> > Adventurers in diving bells will not find schools of fish swimming in
        >> > and out of the old houses and mills of Elmdale, Glen Rock, Ashland,
        >> > Richmond, Kent, South Scituate or parts of Ponagansett, Harrisdale,
        >> > Rockland and Saundersville. Drain their watery grave and you will find
        >> > no Atlantis, Rhode Island-style. Sorry. Everything was demolished
        >> > before the flood.
        >> >
        >> > In 1915, the General Assembly created a Water Supply Board, which took
        >> > 23.1 of Scituate's 55 square miles by eminent domain, and then,
        >> > according to the Supply Board's voluminous records, tore down "1,195
        >> > buildings, including 375 houses, 233 barns, 7 schools, 6 churches, 6
        >> > mills, 30 dairy farms, 11 ice houses, 5 halls, post offices, taverns,
        >> > general stores, blacksmith and wheelwright shops, cider mills, two
        >> > fire stations, and an electric-railway system (the Providence and
        >> > Danielson Railroad)."
        >> >
        >> > By 1926, construction of the reservoir was complete. The northern
        >> > branch of the Pawtuxet River took a year to fill it up. Even when it's
        >> > full, the 39 billion gallons of water cover only 5.3 of the 23.1
        >> > square miles of the land taken by the state. The remaining 17.8 square
        >> > miles were designated as watershed, flooded with 7 million newly
        >> > planted evergreen trees, and barred to development.
        >> >
        >> > A large portion of the architecture that bit the dust between 1915 and
        >> > 1926 was not in the area submerged in water, but on land protected to
        >> > keep the water pure. Just imagine seeing your house demolished, yet
        >> > the land on which it sat forever high and dry. Cleanliness may be next
        >> > to godliness, but, ah! the frustration!
        >> >
        >> > In 1869, half a century before that reservoir was built, Providence
        >> > voters agreed to build the city's first modern water- supply system.
        >> > Its source was the Pawtuxet River. It fed Sockanosset Reservoir, in
        >> > Cranston, and then flowed downhill by pipe to Providence, into the
        >> > Hope Reservoir, built in 1875 at Hope and Olney streets. That
        >> > reservoir was rendered obsolete by the Scituate Reservoir, in 1926.
        >> > Hope High School was built on filled land at the Hope Reservoir site,
        >> > in 1938.
        >> >
        >> > But aren't we getting a bit far from Scituate? Not as far as Scituate,
        >> > Mass., for which the town was named. Anyway, it was the rise of mills
        >> > on the Pawtuxet that polluted its waters, forcing Providence to dam
        >> > its northern leg and create the Scituate Reservoir.
        >> >
        >> > Scituate, Glocester and Smithfield - part of territory called "the
        >> > Providence Woods," or "the Outlands" -- were split off from Providence
        >> > and incorporated as towns on Feb. 20, 1730-31 (the calendar shifted
        >> > that year), becoming Rhode Island's 13th, 14th and 15th jurisdictions
        >> > (not necessarily in that order). In 1781, Foster split off from Scituate.
        >> >
        >> > On Monday, I was driven through Scituate by Shirley Arnold and Fred
        >> > Faria, respectively historian and former president of the Scituate
        >> > Preservation Society. Mr. Faria's forest-green 1970 Malibu convertible
        >> > was the perfect platform from which to view the town's landscapes of
        >> > green and blue.
        >> >
        >> > Most of the 158 historic sites listed in the Rhode Island Historical
        >> > Preservation & Heritage Commission's 1980 survey of Scituate were, it
        >> > seems to me, painted white. Of these, the most impressive is the
        >> > Smithville Institute, with its imposing portico, its pediment upheld
        >> > by four massive Ionic columns. Designed by Russell Warren, it was
        >> > completed about a decade after he contributed his half of the design
        >> > for the Providence Arcade (1828).
        >> >
        >> > Much of Scituate's 18th and 19th Century architecture clusters at the
        >> > crossroads of its remaining villages. The best-preserved stretches of
        >> > streetscape are, it seems to me, in Hope, Clayville and North
        >> > Scituate. Few modern structures squat in their midst to erode the
        >> > ambiance of history. And so far as I could tell, only one major slash
        >> > of crudscape has been inflicted upon the town. True, beyond the
        >> > village centers and the watershed, the forest is dotted with housing
        >> > of recent vintage, but much of it ducks behind lush roadside verdure
        >> > with becoming modesty.
        >> >
        >> > Indeed, so fully have woods and water replaced Scituate's old rural
        >> > landscapes of farmland, pasture and meadow that one could almost say
        >> > its historic character has not been preserved at all, but radically
        >> > transformed . . . Nah. Too pretty for that.
        >> >
        >> > Speaking of radical transformation, consider this headline from The
        >> > Providence Journal of Jan. 24, 1946: "Chopmist Hill District is Rated
        >> > One of Top Potential Locations for UNO Headquarters by Committee."
        >> > This was news to me! The United Nations in Rhode Island! Seems that
        >> > Scituate's highest hill was a major post in World War II for
        >> > electronic eavesdropping on enemy radio transmissions. Such a capacity
        >> > was a factor in choosing a U.N. site.
        >> >
        >> > Well, it never happened. Manhattan got the nod instead, and thankfully
        >> > so. Unpaid official parking tickets and low-numbered diplomat license
        >> > plates would've scandalized Rhode Island. Our restaurant scene might
        >> > have blossomed sooner, but Scituate's historic charm would've been
        >> > history.
        >> >
        >> > David Brussat is a member of The Journal's editorial board. His e-
        >> > mail is: dbrussat@projo. com <mailto:dbrussat% 40projo.com> .
        >> >
        >> > Cultivating the town's roots-; [Northwest Edition]
        >> > RAGHURAM VADAREVU Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal.
        >> > Providence, R.I.: Jan 27, 2000. pg. C.01
        >> >
        >> > ProQuest document ID: 48455593
        >> > Document URL:
        >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
        >> 77194&RQT= 309
        >> > &VName=PQD
        >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
        >> amp;clientId=
        >> > 77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
        >> >
        >> > Full Text (920 words)
        >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Jan 27, 2000
        >> >
        >> > * In a town where entire villages were lost to make way for a
        >> > reservoir, the Scituate Preservation Society has had its work cut out
        >> > for it as it seeks to protect the past.
        >> >
        >> > ***
        >> >
        >> > SCITUATE - It was the 1970s when a handful of residents began talking
        >> > about preserving the town's rapidly vanishing history.
        >> >
        >> > Old buildings were being torn down and there wasn't much information
        >> > on the town's history. The reservoir had long since drowned the
        >> > stories of the town's oldest families.
        >> >
        >> > On Sept. 17, 1975, Barbara and Carl H. Stetson Jr. mailed postcards to
        >> > the entire town calling for an old-fashioned town meeting.
        >> >
        >> > Young and old alike, help form the Scituate Preservation Society, the
        >> > postcards read, Barbara Stetson explained recently.
        >> >
        >> > Why a society? To preserve Scituate memorabilia and to provide
        >> > activities related to preservation and restoration, she said.
        >> >
        >> > About 100 people showed up in the junior and senior high school and 60
        >> > formed the group, which was named the Preservation and Heritage
        >> > Society of Scituate.
        >> >
        >> > This year, the group, now called the Scituate Preservation Society,
        >> > celebrates its 25th anniversary. It boasts membership of more than 100
        >> > and has helped preserve the town's rich Colonial and agricultural
        >> > heritage.
        >> >
        >> > The community really came together, Barbara Stetson said.
        >> >
        >> > NEARLY EVERYTHING the Preservation Society has been involved in - from
        >> > where the group meets at Grange 39 to the one-room school house in
        >> > Potterville - has been touched with history.
        >> >
        >> > The group began meeting at the North Scituate Community House, but
        >> > then moved in the late 1980s into Grange 39, at the corner of Gleaner
        >> > Chapel Road and Hartford Pike.
        >> >
        >> > Ask archivist Shirley Arnold or past president Fred Faria about the
        >> > Grange's history and they'll offer up dozens of interesting tidbits.
        >> >
        >> > The Grange building was first inhabited by the Wayside Gleaners, a
        >> > religious group that lived a simple life and went into the fields
        >> > after farmers' harvests to glean leftover produce so it wasn't wasted,
        >> > Faria said.
        >> >
        >> > The Grange, a society of farmers, took over the building in the 1930s
        >> > and used it as a gathering place, where they held minstrel shows,
        >> > suppers and regular meetings. The society moved in during the late 1980s.
        >> >
        >> > During its more than two decades in existence, the society has helped
        >> > restore many structures, including Grange 39. The group has received
        >> > about $5,000 in grants to rehabilitate the Grange in the last two years.
        >> >
        >> > The group also restored the old Potterville school, one of 19 one-
        >> > room schoolhouses in town, and its outhouse.
        >> >
        >> > Both structures are used for elementary school tours, Faria said, so
        >> > the kids can also see and understand how people had to go to the bathroom.
        >> >
        >> > In 1996, the society helped build a replica bell tower between the Old
        >> > Congregational Church and the North Scituate Community House. The
        >> > original bell from the Richmond Mill was put in the tower, Arnold said.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold and the society helped establish the Heritage Room at the North
        >> > Scituate Public library in 1988. The room holds many artifacts and
        >> > memorabilia of old Scituate.
        >> >
        >> > ONE RECENT FRIDAY, Faria and Arnold sifted through a small room at
        >> > Grange 39, searching for relics of old Scituate.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold leaned into a display case near a window and pulled out a
        >> > potato ricer that was used around 1900. Dusty books rested on the
        >> > shelves alongside folders and rolled-up maps.
        >> >
        >> > Faded-brown tax notices lay in another display case. In 1885, the tax
        >> > rate was 70 cents per $100 of property value.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold said she hopes one day to transform the Grange into a small
        >> > museum featuring photos and memorabilia from Scituate. She said, We
        >> > got our work cut out for us.
        >> >
        >> > And who better to take on the task than Arnold, whose ancestors, the
        >> > Knights, settled in Scituate in the 1700s.
        >> >
        >> > She picked up an old map book from 1870 by D.G. Beers & Co. It showed
        >> > the town the way it had been before several villages were submerged to
        >> > create the Scituate Reservoir.
        >> >
        >> > Arnold searched for the Knight family name on the map. Her finger ran
        >> > across the Burnt Hill district in the southern section of town until
        >> > she found them: L.S. Knight, L.A. Knight and Joseph Knight.
        >> >
        >> > Although Arnold knows her family history, there are many in town who
        >> > don't know the town's history.
        >> >
        >> > Faria said, We are trying to look at everything that has existed. The
        >> > stuff that is gone, we try to bring back. You have to keep your roots.
        >> > If you lose your roots, you lose your heritage.
        >> >
        >> > The 25-year-old Preservation Society will meet tonight at the Grange,
        >> > where members will elect new officers and cut the anniversary cake.
        >> >
        >> > Barbara Stetson, one of the founders, said, I think it will continue
        >> > to last a long, long time because people are interested in where they
        >> > live and they are wiling to participate in their heritage.
        >> >
        >> > * * *
        >> >
        >> > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
        >> >
        >> > CENTURY-OLD SOUVENIRS: Shirley Arnold, an archivist with the Scituate
        >> > Preservation Society, shows off a potato ricer last used around 1900
        >> > that was donated to the group and is now stored with other artifacts
        >> > at Grange 39. Below, Fred Faria, a past president of the society,
        >> > stands next to town tax notices dating back to 1885.
        >> >
        >> > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
        >> >
        >> > REMEMBERING THE PAST: Shirley Arnold and Fred Faria, members of the
        >> > Scituate Preservation Society, look through historical periodicals,
        >> > including a World War II-era Providence Evening Bulletin at Grange 39.
        >> > Below, Arnold points to where her relatives lived in the Burnt Hill
        >> > section of town on a 130-year-old map.
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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      • Jean the Queen
        Sheila said: cousin Jean and I will be serving coffee, donuts, etc! I was actually going to say you and I would make sandwiches...geez, our minds run in the
        Message 3 of 6 , May 1, 2008
          Sheila said: cousin Jean and I will be serving coffee, donuts, etc!


          I was actually going to say you and I would make sandwiches...geez, our
          minds run in the same lane here... Cuz Jean


          -------Original Message-------

          From: Sheila Stewart
          Date: 5/1/2008 6:29:11 AM
          To: RI Ancestors
          Subject: Re: [RI_Ancestors] Scituate

          Linda,

          I never laughed so much and so hard in all my life. We were looking through
          some folders and Don says there is nothing on the Taylors. I pick one up and
          find that bit on the ³Po White and Half Indian Taylors² and thought this is
          typical man who can¹t see right in front of his eyes! Then I started
          reading, then aloud and that was it for me. I couldn¹t stop laughing. I
          think that was why Shirley Arnold came over to us. She wanted to see what we
          were doing that was so much fun!

          But, this was several hours AFTER Don called me at 7:30 AM telling me he was
          already in Scituate, had knocked on some doors on Brandy Brook Rd. looking
          for his Taylor Lot! He woke up half the town!! He found one woman who had
          gone to the grocery store and followed her there. I was ready to kill him. I
          had NEVER met him and only chatting with him online and was going to help
          him find his Taylor Lot. So, I told him to behave, meet me at the library
          that doesn¹t open til 10 and to behave himself in the meantime! I had time
          to shower, dress, stop for coffee at Dunkin and we still had plenty of time
          to waste before the library opened. :)

          It was a fun day. We¹ll call you next time he comes to Scituate! He found
          his Taylor Lot but it is a mess. It is so sad. You¹d never know it is a
          cemetery if you were walking through the woods. All the railings are gone,
          many stones are down, and it needs a lot of work.

          So, he needs to get up here, tell us when he¹s coming and post a request for
          volunteers. We can all put out the word and bring as many as we can and as
          much heavy machinery, too! Not all can do a lot of physical work...Sheila


          On 5/1/08 12:33 AM, "Linda Peloquin" <miyukichan0987@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >
          > OMG...I've got to wear waterproof mascara and have an oxygen bottle handy
          > when I read some of these!!
          >
          > How come I'm never in the library when these things happen?? that must
          have
          > been a riot !! Too bad they weren't the RIGHT Indians with the High
          Stakes
          > Indian Bingo cause you might be rich by now!!
          > Linda
          >
          > Donald Taylor <dtaylor120@... <mailto:dtaylor120%40yahoo.com> >
          wrote:
          > I remember, yes it was her and it was you that almost got us kicked out.
          You
          > kept yelling "they were indians, they were indians"!
          > Don
          >
          > ----- Original Message ----
          > From: Sheila Stewart <SLS91750@... <mailto:SLS91750%40COX.NET> >
          > To: RI Ancestors <RI_Ancestors@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:RI_Ancestors%40yahoogroups.com> >
          > Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 9:30:24 PM
          > Subject: Re: [RI_Ancestors] Scituate Reservoir ~~~ More History from the
          > Projo
          >
          > Hey Don,
          >
          > Wasn¹t it Shirley Arnold who¹s mentioned in the article below that we met
          in
          > Scituate that day you almost got me kicked out of the Scituate Library? I
          > think it was. I was laughing so much at the fact I had found your Taylor
          > folk were ³po white and half Indian² and lived in the middle of the Pine
          > Swamp on an island. And, don¹t forget that my Harris ancestors brought
          the
          > wool for the Taylor gals to spin while the men did nothing!! I do
          remember
          > meeting her there. Do you remember meeting her or where you too much in
          > shock? LOL
          >
          > Cuz Sheila
          >
          > On 4/30/08 11:50 AM, "Linda" <miyukichan0987@ yahoo.com> wrote:
          >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> > Here are a couple more articles that have appeared in the Projo
          >> > regarding Scituate history & Reservoir history that might new to some
          >> > & of interest to some of the Group with roots in Scituate.
          >> >
          >> > Reservoir dead; [Northwest Edition]
          >> > NEIL SHEA Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.:
          >> > Sep 19, 2002. pg. D.01
          >> >
          >> > ProQuest document ID: 187428571
          >> > Document URL:
          >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
          >> 77194&RQT= 30
          >> > 9&VName=PQD
          >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=187428571& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
          >> amp;clientId
          >> > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
          >> >
          >> > Full Text (836 words)
          >> >
          >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Sep 19, 2002
          >> >
          >> > * A dozen or more small burial plots, abandoned when the Scituate
          >> > Reservoir was filled, are hidden on the land around the water supply.
          >> >
          >> > * * *
          >> >
          >> > SCITUATE - The graveyards are islands of memory sinking in a sea of
          >> > green foliage.
          >> >
          >> > Some embrace the bones of Revolutionary War heroes. Some shelter the
          >> > stacked coffins of infant brothers and sisters who died during hard
          >> > winters.
          >> >
          >> > All are disappearing under blankets of moss, leaves and broken
          branches.
          >> >
          >> > There are a dozen or more small burial plots hidden in the 11,600
          >> > acres of forest surrounding the Scituate Reservoir. Most are filled
          >> > with several generations of the same family. They were abandoned when
          >> > the reservoir was filled in the early 1920s, drowning almost 1,000
          >> > houses, farms, schools, churches and stores.
          >> >
          >> > Since the reservoir was built and the land around it closed off to the
          >> > public, only relatives of the dead have been allowed to visit the
          >> > graveyards, and sometimes, be buried in them. While all of the graves
          >> > were carefully mapped and names of the dead recorded in state files,
          >> > the graveyards stand unshielded from the seasons.
          >> >
          >> > For Shirley Arnold, historian of the Scituate Preservation Society,
          >> > the plots are personal: several of her maternal ancestors, members of
          >> > the Knight family, are buried around the reservoir.
          >> >
          >> > The Knights settled in the area in 1706, 24 years before the town was
          >> > founded.
          >> >
          >> > One of them, Joseph Knight, became a colonel in the Continental Army,
          >> > commander of the second company of Scituate minutemen formed to fight
          >> > the British. He fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and now lies in
          >> > Rhode Island Historical Cemetery Number 59, under a cool forest canopy

          >> >
          >> > In the dimly lit past, behind seven generations of Knights and as many
          >> > repetitions of the word great, the colonel was a grandfather of Arnold
          s.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold, 67, has visited his grave three times, cleaning and tidying up
          >> > around the plot. An official from the Providence Water Supply Board,
          >> > the agency that owns the land, accompanied her during each visit.
          >> >
          >> > Knight is buried beside his wife and first cousin, Elizabeth. Other
          >> > family members rest nearby.
          >> >
          >> > The first time Arnold visited Knight, a metal marker adorned his
          >> > grave. It was a proud decoration, placed there sometime in the last
          >> > century to announce his military service. The marker later
          >> > disappeared. It was taken, Arnold thinks, by a vandal, or maybe a
          >> > souvenir hunter.
          >> >
          >> > While Arnold has visited and tended to her relatives' plot, others go
          >> > unnoticed for decades.
          >> >
          >> > At Historical Cemetery No. 51, wildflowers and blueberries are the
          >> > only decorations.
          >> >
          >> > The cemetery lies along an old road not far from the banks of the
          >> > reservoir. It is surrounded by waist-high stonewalls that are thick
          >> > and wide, built to an old standard, without concrete. An iron gate,
          >> > rusted shut, seals the yard.
          >> >
          >> > There, saluted by chirping crickets and wheezing cicadas, 19 members
          >> > of the Battey and Page families are buried. The bloodline there begins
          >> > with Dr. Owen Battey, born in 1773 on the eve of the Revolution.
          >> >
          >> > Battey was a physician and also a postmaster and justice of the peace.
          >> > He and his wife Ruth, who is buried beside him, had 10 children.
          >> >
          >> > In a nearby grave, three of them are buried together. None lived much
          >> > longer than a year. The briefest life etched into the faded marble
          >> > stone belonged to Sarah Battey, who died in December 1817, 11 days
          >> > old. Dr. Battey lived to see the start of the Civil War, and died at
          >> > 90 in 1862.
          >> >
          >> > Most of the headstones are gray and mottled, stained with lichens and
          >> > roughened by years of rain, snow and heat.
          >> >
          >> > But one stone stands out as a relatively recent addition to the yard.
          >> > A couple, related to the Pages and Batteys by blood and marriage, was
          >> > buried here in 1981 and 1982.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold said the Water Supply Board allows some relatives of the old
          >> > dead to be buried in family plots if they can prove ancestry.
          >> > Officials at the water board confirmed the practice. A water board
          >> > official who knew of Arnold's blood ties to her ancestor's city- owned
          >> > plot once good-naturedly offered her a spot.
          >> >
          >> > There's still plenty of room in there, he said.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold declined.
          >> >
          >> > Who'll visit my grave? she asked.
          >> >
          >> > As a historian, Arnold helped write a book about Scituate and its Lost
          >> > Villages, the towns that were inundated by the reservoir.
          >> >
          >> > She knows first hand how the enormous project disturbed lives, and
          >> > sometimes wrecked them she has documented eight cases where residents
          >> > committed suicide rather than leave their land.
          >> >
          >> > Above all, she said, history was treasured. That history was embodied
          >> > in the family boneyards.
          >> >
          >> > The thing that bothered people the most, if they had to move, was
          >> > moving their family burial plots, Arnold said. Eventually they're all
          >> > going to be forgotten. But I think they would have liked being left
          there.
          >> >
          >> > * * *
          >> >
          >> > * A GRAVE TRAIL: Richard Blodgett, environmental manager for the
          >> > Providence Water Supply Board, walks past a grave on land around the
          >> > Scituate Reservoir.
          >> >
          >> > JOURNAL PHOTO / BOB BREIDENBACH
          >> >
          >> > COMMENTARY - Scituate's deep reservoir of history; [All Edition]
          >> > DAVID BRUSSAT. The Providence Journal. Providence, R.I.: Aug 11, 2005.
          >> > pg. B.05
          >> >
          >> > ProQuest document ID: 882780351
          >> > Document URL:
          >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
          >> 77194&RQT= 30
          >> > 9&VName=PQD
          >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=882780351& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
          >> amp;clientId
          >> > =77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
          >> >
          >> > Full Text (837 words)
          >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Aug 11, 2005
          >> >
          >> > SCITUATE - ROMANTICS might be disappointed that the lost villages of
          >> > Scituate are not standing at the bottom of the Scituate Reservoir.
          >> > Adventurers in diving bells will not find schools of fish swimming in
          >> > and out of the old houses and mills of Elmdale, Glen Rock, Ashland,
          >> > Richmond, Kent, South Scituate or parts of Ponagansett, Harrisdale,
          >> > Rockland and Saundersville. Drain their watery grave and you will find
          >> > no Atlantis, Rhode Island-style. Sorry. Everything was demolished
          >> > before the flood.
          >> >
          >> > In 1915, the General Assembly created a Water Supply Board, which took
          >> > 23.1 of Scituate's 55 square miles by eminent domain, and then,
          >> > according to the Supply Board's voluminous records, tore down "1,195
          >> > buildings, including 375 houses, 233 barns, 7 schools, 6 churches, 6
          >> > mills, 30 dairy farms, 11 ice houses, 5 halls, post offices, taverns,
          >> > general stores, blacksmith and wheelwright shops, cider mills, two
          >> > fire stations, and an electric-railway system (the Providence and
          >> > Danielson Railroad)."
          >> >
          >> > By 1926, construction of the reservoir was complete. The northern
          >> > branch of the Pawtuxet River took a year to fill it up. Even when it's
          >> > full, the 39 billion gallons of water cover only 5.3 of the 23.1
          >> > square miles of the land taken by the state. The remaining 17.8 square
          >> > miles were designated as watershed, flooded with 7 million newly
          >> > planted evergreen trees, and barred to development.
          >> >
          >> > A large portion of the architecture that bit the dust between 1915 and
          >> > 1926 was not in the area submerged in water, but on land protected to
          >> > keep the water pure. Just imagine seeing your house demolished, yet
          >> > the land on which it sat forever high and dry. Cleanliness may be next
          >> > to godliness, but, ah! the frustration!
          >> >
          >> > In 1869, half a century before that reservoir was built, Providence
          >> > voters agreed to build the city's first modern water- supply system.
          >> > Its source was the Pawtuxet River. It fed Sockanosset Reservoir, in
          >> > Cranston, and then flowed downhill by pipe to Providence, into the
          >> > Hope Reservoir, built in 1875 at Hope and Olney streets. That
          >> > reservoir was rendered obsolete by the Scituate Reservoir, in 1926.
          >> > Hope High School was built on filled land at the Hope Reservoir site,
          >> > in 1938.
          >> >
          >> > But aren't we getting a bit far from Scituate? Not as far as Scituate,
          >> > Mass., for which the town was named. Anyway, it was the rise of mills
          >> > on the Pawtuxet that polluted its waters, forcing Providence to dam
          >> > its northern leg and create the Scituate Reservoir.
          >> >
          >> > Scituate, Glocester and Smithfield - part of territory called "the
          >> > Providence Woods," or "the Outlands" -- were split off from Providence
          >> > and incorporated as towns on Feb. 20, 1730-31 (the calendar shifted
          >> > that year), becoming Rhode Island's 13th, 14th and 15th jurisdictions
          >> > (not necessarily in that order). In 1781, Foster split off from
          Scituate.
          >> >
          >> > On Monday, I was driven through Scituate by Shirley Arnold and Fred
          >> > Faria, respectively historian and former president of the Scituate
          >> > Preservation Society. Mr. Faria's forest-green 1970 Malibu convertible
          >> > was the perfect platform from which to view the town's landscapes of
          >> > green and blue.
          >> >
          >> > Most of the 158 historic sites listed in the Rhode Island Historical
          >> > Preservation & Heritage Commission's 1980 survey of Scituate were, it
          >> > seems to me, painted white. Of these, the most impressive is the
          >> > Smithville Institute, with its imposing portico, its pediment upheld
          >> > by four massive Ionic columns. Designed by Russell Warren, it was
          >> > completed about a decade after he contributed his half of the design
          >> > for the Providence Arcade (1828).
          >> >
          >> > Much of Scituate's 18th and 19th Century architecture clusters at the
          >> > crossroads of its remaining villages. The best-preserved stretches of
          >> > streetscape are, it seems to me, in Hope, Clayville and North
          >> > Scituate. Few modern structures squat in their midst to erode the
          >> > ambiance of history. And so far as I could tell, only one major slash
          >> > of crudscape has been inflicted upon the town. True, beyond the
          >> > village centers and the watershed, the forest is dotted with housing
          >> > of recent vintage, but much of it ducks behind lush roadside verdure
          >> > with becoming modesty.
          >> >
          >> > Indeed, so fully have woods and water replaced Scituate's old rural
          >> > landscapes of farmland, pasture and meadow that one could almost say
          >> > its historic character has not been preserved at all, but radically
          >> > transformed . . . Nah. Too pretty for that.
          >> >
          >> > Speaking of radical transformation, consider this headline from The
          >> > Providence Journal of Jan. 24, 1946: "Chopmist Hill District is Rated
          >> > One of Top Potential Locations for UNO Headquarters by Committee."
          >> > This was news to me! The United Nations in Rhode Island! Seems that
          >> > Scituate's highest hill was a major post in World War II for
          >> > electronic eavesdropping on enemy radio transmissions. Such a capacity
          >> > was a factor in choosing a U.N. site.
          >> >
          >> > Well, it never happened. Manhattan got the nod instead, and thankfully
          >> > so. Unpaid official parking tickets and low-numbered diplomat license
          >> > plates would've scandalized Rhode Island. Our restaurant scene might
          >> > have blossomed sooner, but Scituate's historic charm would've been
          >> > history.
          >> >
          >> > David Brussat is a member of The Journal's editorial board. His e-
          >> > mail is: dbrussat@projo. com <mailto:dbrussat% 40projo.com> .
          >> >
          >> > Cultivating the town's roots-; [Northwest Edition]
          >> > RAGHURAM VADAREVU Journal Staff Writer. Providence Journal.
          >> > Providence, R.I.: Jan 27, 2000. pg. C.01
          >> >
          >> > ProQuest document ID: 48455593
          >> > Document URL:
          >> > http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& sid=1&Fmt= 3&clientId=
          >> 77194&RQT= 309
          >> > &VName=PQD
          >> > <http://proquest. umi.com/pqdweb? did=48455593& amp;sid=1& amp;Fmt=3&
          >> amp;clientId=
          >> > 77194&RQT= 309&VName= PQD>
          >> >
          >> > Full Text (920 words)
          >> > Copyright Providence Journal/Evening Bulletin Jan 27, 2000
          >> >
          >> > * In a town where entire villages were lost to make way for a
          >> > reservoir, the Scituate Preservation Society has had its work cut out
          >> > for it as it seeks to protect the past.
          >> >
          >> > ***
          >> >
          >> > SCITUATE - It was the 1970s when a handful of residents began talking
          >> > about preserving the town's rapidly vanishing history.
          >> >
          >> > Old buildings were being torn down and there wasn't much information
          >> > on the town's history. The reservoir had long since drowned the
          >> > stories of the town's oldest families.
          >> >
          >> > On Sept. 17, 1975, Barbara and Carl H. Stetson Jr. mailed postcards to
          >> > the entire town calling for an old-fashioned town meeting.
          >> >
          >> > Young and old alike, help form the Scituate Preservation Society, the
          >> > postcards read, Barbara Stetson explained recently.
          >> >
          >> > Why a society? To preserve Scituate memorabilia and to provide
          >> > activities related to preservation and restoration, she said.
          >> >
          >> > About 100 people showed up in the junior and senior high school and 60
          >> > formed the group, which was named the Preservation and Heritage
          >> > Society of Scituate.
          >> >
          >> > This year, the group, now called the Scituate Preservation Society,
          >> > celebrates its 25th anniversary. It boasts membership of more than 100
          >> > and has helped preserve the town's rich Colonial and agricultural
          >> > heritage.
          >> >
          >> > The community really came together, Barbara Stetson said.
          >> >
          >> > NEARLY EVERYTHING the Preservation Society has been involved in - from
          >> > where the group meets at Grange 39 to the one-room school house in
          >> > Potterville - has been touched with history.
          >> >
          >> > The group began meeting at the North Scituate Community House, but
          >> > then moved in the late 1980s into Grange 39, at the corner of Gleaner
          >> > Chapel Road and Hartford Pike.
          >> >
          >> > Ask archivist Shirley Arnold or past president Fred Faria about the
          >> > Grange's history and they'll offer up dozens of interesting tidbits.
          >> >
          >> > The Grange building was first inhabited by the Wayside Gleaners, a
          >> > religious group that lived a simple life and went into the fields
          >> > after farmers' harvests to glean leftover produce so it wasn't wasted,
          >> > Faria said.
          >> >
          >> > The Grange, a society of farmers, took over the building in the 1930s
          >> > and used it as a gathering place, where they held minstrel shows,
          >> > suppers and regular meetings. The society moved in during the late
          1980s.
          >> >
          >> > During its more than two decades in existence, the society has helped
          >> > restore many structures, including Grange 39. The group has received
          >> > about $5,000 in grants to rehabilitate the Grange in the last two
          years.
          >> >
          >> > The group also restored the old Potterville school, one of 19 one-
          >> > room schoolhouses in town, and its outhouse.
          >> >
          >> > Both structures are used for elementary school tours, Faria said, so
          >> > the kids can also see and understand how people had to go to the
          bathroom.
          >> >
          >> > In 1996, the society helped build a replica bell tower between the Old
          >> > Congregational Church and the North Scituate Community House. The
          >> > original bell from the Richmond Mill was put in the tower, Arnold said

          >> >
          >> > Arnold and the society helped establish the Heritage Room at the North
          >> > Scituate Public library in 1988. The room holds many artifacts and
          >> > memorabilia of old Scituate.
          >> >
          >> > ONE RECENT FRIDAY, Faria and Arnold sifted through a small room at
          >> > Grange 39, searching for relics of old Scituate.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold leaned into a display case near a window and pulled out a
          >> > potato ricer that was used around 1900. Dusty books rested on the
          >> > shelves alongside folders and rolled-up maps.
          >> >
          >> > Faded-brown tax notices lay in another display case. In 1885, the tax
          >> > rate was 70 cents per $100 of property value.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold said she hopes one day to transform the Grange into a small
          >> > museum featuring photos and memorabilia from Scituate. She said, We
          >> > got our work cut out for us.
          >> >
          >> > And who better to take on the task than Arnold, whose ancestors, the
          >> > Knights, settled in Scituate in the 1700s.
          >> >
          >> > She picked up an old map book from 1870 by D.G. Beers & Co. It showed
          >> > the town the way it had been before several villages were submerged to
          >> > create the Scituate Reservoir.
          >> >
          >> > Arnold searched for the Knight family name on the map. Her finger ran
          >> > across the Burnt Hill district in the southern section of town until
          >> > she found them: L.S. Knight, L.A. Knight and Joseph Knight.
          >> >
          >> > Although Arnold knows her family history, there are many in town who
          >> > don't know the town's history.
          >> >
          >> > Faria said, We are trying to look at everything that has existed. The
          >> > stuff that is gone, we try to bring back. You have to keep your roots.
          >> > If you lose your roots, you lose your heritage.
          >> >
          >> > The 25-year-old Preservation Society will meet tonight at the Grange,
          >> > where members will elect new officers and cut the anniversary cake.
          >> >
          >> > Barbara Stetson, one of the founders, said, I think it will continue
          >> > to last a long, long time because people are interested in where they
          >> > live and they are wiling to participate in their heritage.
          >> >
          >> > * * *
          >> >
          >> > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
          >> >
          >> > CENTURY-OLD SOUVENIRS: Shirley Arnold, an archivist with the Scituate
          >> > Preservation Society, shows off a potato ricer last used around 1900
          >> > that was donated to the group and is now stored with other artifacts
          >> > at Grange 39. Below, Fred Faria, a past president of the society,
          >> > stands next to town tax notices dating back to 1885.
          >> >
          >> > Journal photos / C.J. GUNTHER
          >> >
          >> > REMEMBERING THE PAST: Shirley Arnold and Fred Faria, members of the
          >> > Scituate Preservation Society, look through historical periodicals,
          >> > including a World War II-era Providence Evening Bulletin at Grange 39.
          >> > Below, Arnold points to where her relatives lived in the Burnt Hill
          >> > section of town on a 130-year-old map.
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >
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