Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

1940 US census

Expand Messages
  • benyoung933
    I thought you might be able to use this information to prepare for the 1940 Census release. *************************************************** PREPARING FOR
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I thought you might be able to use this information to prepare for the 1940 Census release.

      ***************************************************

      PREPARING FOR THE 1940 US CENSUS
      by Bryan L. Mulcahy, Reference Librarian at the Fort Myers Public Library.

      The 1940 federal census will be released for unrestricted public access on April 2, 2012. Digitized images will be accessible at National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) facilities nationwide through public access computers, as well as on personal computers via the internet using databases such as Ancestry.com, Ancestry Library Edition, Fold3.com, and Heritage Quest.

      April 1, 1940 was the official census day. Questions recorded on the schedules are similar to those found on earlier census schedules. As the enumerators went door-to-door, they recorded the location of the household (street name and house number in cities and towns), names for each household member and their relationship to the head of the household. Enumerators also recorded a personal description for each household member, including their age and sex; each individual's education; birthplace and naturalization status; and specific place of residence on April 1, 1935. In addition, all individuals over the age of 14 were asked questions about employment. Those on lines 14 & 29 (5% of the population) were asked fifteen supplementary questions, including parents birthplace; earliest language spoken in the household; questions relating to veterans; Social Security; occupation; and a final section specifically for women, which recorded marital status and number of children born.

      The National Archives has developed a website designed to guide researchers as they prepare to search the census following formal release. Access to the website is available at : http://www.archives.gov/research/ census/1940/index.html. The site even includes a countdown clock that will give you the exact number of days, hours, and minutes until formal release takes place! Information on the website covers the following topics:
      1. General Information
      2. How to Start Your 1940 Census Research (checklist of strategies to prepare for your research)
      3. Finding Aids: geographical descriptions of Census Enumeration Districts (ED), and ED Maps
      4. Instructions Given to Enumerators
      5.Occupation and Industry Classifications
      6. Listing of 1940 City Directories at NARA
      7. Locating EDs Using Stephen P. Morse's Search Engines
      8. Videos and Other Articles and Online Data.
      2. Collect addresses for these people from city directories.
      3. Identify the enumeration district (ED) for the addresses.
      4. Use NARA microfilm publication T1224, Descriptions of Census EDs, 1830-1950.
      5. Use NARA microfilm publication A3378, ED Maps for the Twelfth through Sixteenth Censuses of the United States, 1900-1940 .
      6. Use the 1930/1940 ED Converter utility found on http://www.stevemorse.org Here is a checklist of things you can do to start your 1940 census research:
      1. Make a list of all the people you want to look for in the 1940 census.
      2. Collect addresses for these people from city directories.
      3. Identify the enumeration district (ED) for the addresses.
      4. Use NARA microfilm publication T1224, Descriptions of Census EDs,
      (1830-1950 ).
      5. Use NARA microfilm publication A3378, ED Maps for the Twelfth through Sixteenth Censuses of the United States, 1900-1940.
      6. Use the 1930/1940 ED Converter utility found on http://www.stevemorse.org
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.