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USB Gear USB 2.0 Over IP Network 4-Port Hub

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  • rcf362b
    Everyone... I have found a few posts in this group about USB extenders and some other creative ideas that some of you all have used to overcome the problem of
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 16, 2011
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      Everyone...

      I have found a few posts in this group about USB extenders and some other creative ideas that some of you all have used to overcome the problem of getting USB connectivity remotely out to the scope (without using an additional computer via WiFi). The Icron Ranger solution looks good, but it costs over $300 (please correct me if I am wrong and it can be found cheaper). I was wondering if any of you are using or have tried the USB Gear Industrial USB 2.0 Over IP Network 4-Port Hub (USBNET-400 or USBNET-400i). It runs $100. Here is the URL:

      http://www.usbgear.com/computer_cable_details.cfm?sku=USBNET-400&cats=104&catid=187%2C188%2C104%2C653%2C210%2C212

      It seems to have everything most of us would need to connect our scopes remotely up to the extent of Ethernet distance restrictions. It has 4 USB 2.0 ports (the ONLY extender I have found that is 2.0 besides the Icron Ranger, true speed is course limited by the speed of the unit's Fast Ethernet port - 100Mbps, but still better than USB 1.1); provides 500 mA power at each port; and looks to be compatible with pretty much everything (including USB to Serial cables). The USB network drivers are compatible with Windows 7, Vista and XP (sorry Mac users, but the Icron Ranger does support MAC). This device can also be used over a network whereas the Icron Ranger cannot so you could control your scope from any computer on your home network. Another interesting feature listed is that it supports a wide input power range (9-30V DC) so you could conceivably power it from the power port on the RCX panel if you did not have ready access to 110V at the scope, and did not already have the power port in use by something else.

      Anyway, I was thinking about buying one and giving it a shot, but thought I would ask you all for any advice first. If I do end up buying it, I will post my results.

      Clear skies,
      Rob
    • Rod
      I can t speak directly to the unit in your link, but I use a Belkin 5-port USB-Ethernet hub that is pretty similar, and it works very well. I can connect to
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 24, 2011
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        I can't speak directly to the unit in your link, but I use a Belkin 5-port USB-Ethernet hub that is pretty similar, and it works very well. I can connect to my RS232 scope (using Keyspan USB-RS232 adapter), USB camera, and USB focuser from anywhere on my home network as if right next to the devices with a local computer.

        Nice for cold winter stargazing or imaging from your living room! The hub has been out in the observatory (SkyShed POD) through two winters now, and hasn't been trashed yet by the cold (and I DO mean COLD).

        I don't know if this helps you in any way or not, but thought I'd confirm that your concept is sound and practical.

        Rod

        --- In RCX400@yahoogroups.com, "rcf362b" <rcf362b@...> wrote:
        >
        > Everyone...
        >
        > I have found a few posts in this group about USB extenders and some other creative ideas that some of you all have used to overcome the problem of getting USB connectivity remotely out to the scope (without using an additional computer via WiFi). The Icron Ranger solution looks good, but it costs over $300 (please correct me if I am wrong and it can be found cheaper). I was wondering if any of you are using or have tried the USB Gear Industrial USB 2.0 Over IP Network 4-Port Hub (USBNET-400 or USBNET-400i). It runs $100. Here is the URL:
        >
        > http://www.usbgear.com/computer_cable_details.cfm?sku=USBNET-400&cats=104&catid=187%2C188%2C104%2C653%2C210%2C212
        >
        > It seems to have everything most of us would need to connect our scopes remotely up to the extent of Ethernet distance restrictions. It has 4 USB 2.0 ports (the ONLY extender I have found that is 2.0 besides the Icron Ranger, true speed is course limited by the speed of the unit's Fast Ethernet port - 100Mbps, but still better than USB 1.1); provides 500 mA power at each port; and looks to be compatible with pretty much everything (including USB to Serial cables). The USB network drivers are compatible with Windows 7, Vista and XP (sorry Mac users, but the Icron Ranger does support MAC). This device can also be used over a network whereas the Icron Ranger cannot so you could control your scope from any computer on your home network. Another interesting feature listed is that it supports a wide input power range (9-30V DC) so you could conceivably power it from the power port on the RCX panel if you did not have ready access to 110V at the scope, and did not already have the power port in use by something else.
        >
        > Anyway, I was thinking about buying one and giving it a shot, but thought I would ask you all for any advice first. If I do end up buying it, I will post my results.
        >
        > Clear skies,
        > Rob
        >
      • Rob
        Rod, Sorry for the delayed reply. Thank you very much for the feedback. It looks like the Belkin is a good solution. From it s limited availability though
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 5, 2011
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          Rod,

          Sorry for the delayed reply.  Thank you very much for the feedback.  It looks like the Belkin is a good solution.  From it's limited availability though it looks like it may be discontinued.  I also did not see support on the Belkin website for Win7 x64 (which is what I have moved to).  Are you by chase using Win7 x64?

          Thanks again,
          Rob


          On Jan 25, 2011, at 1:15 AM, "Rod" <rodsrun@...> wrote:

           

          I can't speak directly to the unit in your link, but I use a Belkin 5-port USB-Ethernet hub that is pretty similar, and it works very well. I can connect to my RS232 scope (using Keyspan USB-RS232 adapter), USB camera, and USB focuser from anywhere on my home network as if right next to the devices with a local computer.

          Nice for cold winter stargazing or imaging from your living room! The hub has been out in the observatory (SkyShed POD) through two winters now, and hasn't been trashed yet by the cold (and I DO mean COLD).

          I don't know if this helps you in any way or not, but thought I'd confirm that your concept is sound and practical.

          Rod

          --- In RCX400@yahoogroups.com, "rcf362b" <rcf362b@...> wrote:
          >
          > Everyone...
          >
          > I have found a few posts in this group about USB extenders and some other creative ideas that some of you all have used to overcome the problem of getting USB connectivity remotely out to the scope (without using an additional computer via WiFi). The Icron Ranger solution looks good, but it costs over $300 (please correct me if I am wrong and it can be found cheaper). I was wondering if any of you are using or have tried the USB Gear Industrial USB 2.0 Over IP Network 4-Port Hub (USBNET-400 or USBNET-400i). It runs $100. Here is the URL:
          >
          > http://www.usbgear.com/computer_cable_details.cfm?sku=USBNET-400&cats=104&catid=187%2C188%2C104%2C653%2C210%2C212
          >
          > It seems to have everything most of us would need to connect our scopes remotely up to the extent of Ethernet distance restrictions. It has 4 USB 2.0 ports (the ONLY extender I have found that is 2.0 besides the Icron Ranger, true speed is course limited by the speed of the unit's Fast Ethernet port - 100Mbps, but still better than USB 1.1); provides 500 mA power at each port; and looks to be compatible with pretty much everything (including USB to Serial cables). The USB network drivers are compatible with Windows 7, Vista and XP (sorry Mac users, but the Icron Ranger does support MAC). This device can also be used over a network whereas the Icron Ranger cannot so you could control your scope from any computer on your home network. Another interesting feature listed is that it supports a wide input power range (9-30V DC) so you could conceivably power it from the power port on the RCX panel if you did not have ready access to 110V at the scope, and did not already have the power port in use by something else.
          >
          > Anyway, I was thinking about buying one and giving it a shot, but thought I would ask you all for any advice first. If I do end up buying it, I will post my results.
          >
          > Clear skies,
          > Rob
          >

        • Rod
          Nope, running the Belkin software from a Win Vista Ultimate 32-bit laptop. I should try it on one of the WIn7 64-bit machines, to see if it works. I ll post
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 14, 2011
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            Nope, running the Belkin software from a Win Vista Ultimate 32-bit laptop. I should try it on one of the WIn7 64-bit machines, to see if it works. I'll post the results of that experiment here.

            Rod

            --- In RCX400@yahoogroups.com, Rob <rcf362b@...> wrote:
            >
            > Rod,
            >
            > Sorry for the delayed reply. Thank you very much for the feedback. It looks like the Belkin is a good solution. From it's limited availability though it looks like it may be discontinued. I also did not see support on the Belkin website for Win7 x64 (which is what I have moved to). Are you by chase using Win7 x64?
            >
            > Thanks again,
            > Rob
            >
            >
            > On Jan 25, 2011, at 1:15 AM, "Rod" <rodsrun@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I can't speak directly to the unit in your link, but I use a Belkin 5-port USB-Ethernet hub that is pretty similar, and it works very well. I can connect to my RS232 scope (using Keyspan USB-RS232 adapter), USB camera, and USB focuser from anywhere on my home network as if right next to the devices with a local computer.
            > >
            > > Nice for cold winter stargazing or imaging from your living room! The hub has been out in the observatory (SkyShed POD) through two winters now, and hasn't been trashed yet by the cold (and I DO mean COLD).
            > >
            > > I don't know if this helps you in any way or not, but thought I'd confirm that your concept is sound and practical.
            > >
            > > Rod
            > >
            > > --- In RCX400@yahoogroups.com, "rcf362b" <rcf362b@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Everyone...
            > > >
            > > > I have found a few posts in this group about USB extenders and some other creative ideas that some of you all have used to overcome the problem of getting USB connectivity remotely out to the scope (without using an additional computer via WiFi). The Icron Ranger solution looks good, but it costs over $300 (please correct me if I am wrong and it can be found cheaper). I was wondering if any of you are using or have tried the USB Gear Industrial USB 2.0 Over IP Network 4-Port Hub (USBNET-400 or USBNET-400i). It runs $100. Here is the URL:
            > > >
            > > > http://www.usbgear.com/computer_cable_details.cfm?sku=USBNET-400&cats=104&catid=187%2C188%2C104%2C653%2C210%2C212
            > > >
            > > > It seems to have everything most of us would need to connect our scopes remotely up to the extent of Ethernet distance restrictions. It has 4 USB 2.0 ports (the ONLY extender I have found that is 2.0 besides the Icron Ranger, true speed is course limited by the speed of the unit's Fast Ethernet port - 100Mbps, but still better than USB 1.1); provides 500 mA power at each port; and looks to be compatible with pretty much everything (including USB to Serial cables). The USB network drivers are compatible with Windows 7, Vista and XP (sorry Mac users, but the Icron Ranger does support MAC). This device can also be used over a network whereas the Icron Ranger cannot so you could control your scope from any computer on your home network. Another interesting feature listed is that it supports a wide input power range (9-30V DC) so you could conceivably power it from the power port on the RCX panel if you did not have ready access to 110V at the scope, and did not already have the power port in use by something else.
            > > >
            > > > Anyway, I was thinking about buying one and giving it a shot, but thought I would ask you all for any advice first. If I do end up buying it, I will post my results.
            > > >
            > > > Clear skies,
            > > > Rob
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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