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The Voyage Home (Story of Genesis, Creation/Evolution in Sant Mat), PT 12

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  • sant_mat_mystic
    From: [Radhasoami Reality]: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RADHASOAMI-REALITY {Radhasoami Dayal ki Daya Radhasoami Sahai: Grant Merciful Radhasoami Thy Grace
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 20, 2002
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      From: [Radhasoami Reality]:
      {Radhasoami Dayal ki Daya Radhasoami Sahai:
      "Grant Merciful Radhasoami Thy Grace and Protection"}

      The Voyage Home (Story of Genesis, Creation/Evolution in Sant Mat),
      Part Twelve

      The reason that they attend Satsang
      is a fervent desire for meeting the Lord
      and for the welfare of their soul.

      -- Huzur Maharaj

      A Great Journey

      The first abode that the soul discovers after it leaves the physical
      realm is the astral plane, which it enters by means of the third eye,
      through an opening provided by the radiant form of the master. That
      is to say, the soul leaps into the opening and goes beyond it to the
      vista on the other side. At this point the soul has shed its physical
      body, but it is now clothed in a new form -- an astral form rather
      than a physical one. It is a strange new world, and Charan Singh
      offers this advice to those who enter it: "Nothing is to be
      anticipated. Nothing is to be feared. Whenever you feel any
      disturbing or frightening effect turn your thoughts loving to the
      Master and repeat the five Holy Names."

      The names are "tests to challenge the spirits that may appear," and
      there are a good many spirits to be encountered. Souls of various
      sorts go to the astral planes after death, and many yogis are able to
      arrive simply by practicing breath control and exercising their
      powers of concentration. But they depart from the body via the heart
      chakra rather than through the third eye, and they lack the sound and
      the light of the master to guide them. As a result they wander about
      pitiably, lost and confused.

      This is not the fate of the soul led by the Radhasoami master,
      however; for such a soul the journey has just begun.

      The initial technique of simran is less important once a soul attains
      the astral plane, and dhyan changes its character. The master is now
      present in his astral form, so there is no need to envision his
      physical appearance, or to repeat the sacred names in order to center
      the soul. Still, the sacred names are useful as a shield against the
      powers of Kal; they are the only things in the human vocabulary that
      Kal cannot penetrate and as such they are armor for the upward path.
      Replacing simran and dhyan in importance is bhajan (hearing the
      sound), which in Radhasoami usage refers to the presence of a melody -
      - or rather, several melodies, one for each region of consciousness --
      to which the soul should repair for protection and guidance along
      the way. Concomitant with the distinctive sound is a particular light
      (again a different one for each region), which illuminates and
      directs the passage of the soul. In general, the soul is advised to
      steer towards bright light, the five colors, and astronomical bodies
      like the stars, moon and sun.65 But as one's practice advances, one
      is encouraged to attend to sounds rather than light, because sounds
      are thought to contain a purer form of energy. According to
      Radhasoami teachings, the sense of hearing is "subtler" than the
      sense of sight.66 The sounds arid lights one perceives as one ascends
      on one's spiritual journey are thought to be beacons from the highest
      regions, showing weary souls their way home. ("Radhasoami Reality,"
      Mark Juergensmeyer, Princeton University Press, ISBN 0-691-07378-3)
      65 Rai Saligram, Jugat Prakash Radhasoami, p. 26.
      66 Misra, Discourses, p. 219. See also Sawan Singh, Philosophy of the
      Masters, vol. 4, pp. 132-33.
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