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New FTDNA clade names, new SNPs, and a new x-ref

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  • Charles
    Greetings from a long lost participant, I ve been away from this forum for a year, but I did want to let everyone know about a few new things. First, FTDNA
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2010
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      Greetings from a long lost participant,

      I've been away from this forum for a year, but I did want to let everyone know about a few new things.

      First, FTDNA should be updating their Y tree within the next two weeks, and the new subclade names will then show up on testers' FTDNA personal pages, under Haplotree. FTDNA typically updates its tree once a year, or less, and it then remains generally static for at least another year. Meanwhile, the ISOGG tree typically reacts to the FTDNA update, but then is continually updated thereafter as new discoveries are made and confirmed. 23andMe uses the long-form ISOGG names, while many of us have long since moved to using the simpler, consistent SNP-based names such as R-U106, or R-L48, rather than the long names that keep changing.

      As a result of WTY projects and other discovery processes, there are now at least 15 subclades of R-U106, including R-U106* (the category for those who are negative for all the others). In turn, R-L48 now has at least 7 subclades, including R-L48* and the null 425 cluster. However, many of these subclades only include a few, or a single tester, and therefore are perhaps not really "clades", but just so-called "private" family SNPs.

      I have updated my cross-reference in the Files section, which you can find in the alpha list under "Cross". This cross-ref should print in landscape on a single sheet of paper, and can be used to quickly see all of the subclades under R-U106 and R-L48, as well as a couple of ancestral clades and the R-U106 brother clade R-P312 and its two primary descendants. The reference includes the new FTDNA names as well as the ISOGG names, and the old FTDNA names, and some other info.

      Some clades are not on either the new FTDNA tree, or the ISOGG tree, either for privacy reasons, or because they are too new. Since I have been away from this group for a long time, my information may not be entirely accurate.

      I hope everyone is doing well.

      Charles
    • Brian P. Swann
      Welcome back Charles! You have been missed. Time to update all those Excel Spreadsheets and produce some new hypotheses! Brian From:
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2010
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        Welcome back Charles!

         

        You have been missed.  Time to update all those Excel Spreadsheets and produce some new hypotheses!

         

        Brian

         

        From: R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com [mailto:R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charles
        Sent: 01 November 2010 22:01
        To: R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [R1b1c_U106-S21] New FTDNA clade names, new SNPs, and a new x-ref

         

         

        Greetings from a long lost participant,

        I've been away from this forum for a year, but I did want to let everyone know about a few new things.

        First, FTDNA should be updating their Y tree within the next two weeks, and the new subclade names will then show up on testers' FTDNA personal pages, under Haplotree. FTDNA typically updates its tree once a year, or less, and it then remains generally static for at least another year. Meanwhile, the ISOGG tree typically reacts to the FTDNA update, but then is continually updated thereafter as new discoveries are made and confirmed. 23andMe uses the long-form ISOGG names, while many of us have long since moved to using the simpler, consistent SNP-based names such as R-U106, or R-L48, rather than the long names that keep changing.

        As a result of WTY projects and other discovery processes, there are now at least 15 subclades of R-U106, including R-U106* (the category for those who are negative for all the others). In turn, R-L48 now has at least 7 subclades, including R-L48* and the null 425 cluster. However, many of these subclades only include a few, or a single tester, and therefore are perhaps not really "clades", but just so-called "private" family SNPs.

        I have updated my cross-reference in the Files section, which you can find in the alpha list under "Cross". This cross-ref should print in landscape on a single sheet of paper, and can be used to quickly see all of the subclades under R-U106 and R-L48, as well as a couple of ancestral clades and the R-U106 brother clade R-P312 and its two primary descendants. The reference includes the new FTDNA names as well as the ISOGG names, and the old FTDNA names, and some other info.

        Some clades are not on either the new FTDNA tree, or the ISOGG tree, either for privacy reasons, or because they are too new. Since I have been away from this group for a long time, my information may not be entirely accurate.

        I hope everyone is doing well.

        Charles

      • Geoffrey Clark
        Great to hear from you again, Charles! I look forward to your renewed contributions and insights. Geoffrey
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2010
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          Great to hear from you again, Charles!  I look forward to your renewed contributions and insights.

          Geoffrey


          On 11/1/2010 6:00 PM, Charles wrote:
           

          Greetings from a long lost participant,

          I've been away from this forum for a year, but I did want to let everyone know about a few new things.

          First, FTDNA should be updating their Y tree within the next two weeks, and the new subclade names will then show up on testers' FTDNA personal pages, under Haplotree. FTDNA typically updates its tree once a year, or less, and it then remains generally static for at least another year. Meanwhile, the ISOGG tree typically reacts to the FTDNA update, but then is continually updated thereafter as new discoveries are made and confirmed. 23andMe uses the long-form ISOGG names, while many of us have long since moved to using the simpler, consistent SNP-based names such as R-U106, or R-L48, rather than the long names that keep changing.

          As a result of WTY projects and other discovery processes, there are now at least 15 subclades of R-U106, including R-U106* (the category for those who are negative for all the others). In turn, R-L48 now has at least 7 subclades, including R-L48* and the null 425 cluster. However, many of these subclades only include a few, or a single tester, and therefore are perhaps not really "clades", but just so-called "private" family SNPs.

          I have updated my cross-reference in the Files section, which you can find in the alpha list under "Cross". This cross-ref should print in landscape on a single sheet of paper, and can be used to quickly see all of the subclades under R-U106 and R-L48, as well as a couple of ancestral clades and the R-U106 brother clade R-P312 and its two primary descendants. The reference includes the new FTDNA names as well as the ISOGG names, and the old FTDNA names, and some other info.

          Some clades are not on either the new FTDNA tree, or the ISOGG tree, either for privacy reasons, or because they are too new. Since I have been away from this group for a long time, my information may not be entirely accurate.

          I hope everyone is doing well.

          Charles


        • sandgrikes
          Welcome home Charles! Thanks for the heads-up regarding the new forthcoming FTDNA Y tree. Clinton
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 2, 2010
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            Welcome home Charles! Thanks for the heads-up regarding the new forthcoming FTDNA Y tree.

            Clinton

            --- In R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com, "Charles" <cdmo29@...> wrote:
            >
            > Greetings from a long lost participant,
            >
            > I've been away from this forum for a year, but I did want to let everyone know about a few new things.
            >
            > First, FTDNA should be updating their Y tree within the next two weeks, and the new subclade names will then show up on testers' FTDNA personal pages, under Haplotree. FTDNA typically updates its tree once a year, or less, and it then remains generally static for at least another year. Meanwhile, the ISOGG tree typically reacts to the FTDNA update, but then is continually updated thereafter as new discoveries are made and confirmed. 23andMe uses the long-form ISOGG names, while many of us have long since moved to using the simpler, consistent SNP-based names such as R-U106, or R-L48, rather than the long names that keep changing.
            >
            > As a result of WTY projects and other discovery processes, there are now at least 15 subclades of R-U106, including R-U106* (the category for those who are negative for all the others). In turn, R-L48 now has at least 7 subclades, including R-L48* and the null 425 cluster. However, many of these subclades only include a few, or a single tester, and therefore are perhaps not really "clades", but just so-called "private" family SNPs.
            >
            > I have updated my cross-reference in the Files section, which you can find in the alpha list under "Cross". This cross-ref should print in landscape on a single sheet of paper, and can be used to quickly see all of the subclades under R-U106 and R-L48, as well as a couple of ancestral clades and the R-U106 brother clade R-P312 and its two primary descendants. The reference includes the new FTDNA names as well as the ISOGG names, and the old FTDNA names, and some other info.
            >
            > Some clades are not on either the new FTDNA tree, or the ISOGG tree, either for privacy reasons, or because they are too new. Since I have been away from this group for a long time, my information may not be entirely accurate.
            >
            > I hope everyone is doing well.
            >
            > Charles
            >
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