Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [R1b1c_U106-S21] Question about "partial repeat" in L44

Expand Messages
  • Charles Moore
    These are known as microalleles. 636 is an important marker in the otherwise L48*/L200 group, where it changes to 11. Every situation is different, so yours
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 6, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      These are known as microalleles.  636 is an important marker in the otherwise L48*/L200 group, where it changes to 11.  Every situation is different, so yours operates on its own, but it sounds like you can proceed on a presumption that the families involved share a common, presumably pre-surname ancestor.

      Charles


      On Oct 6, 2013, at 12:43 PM, ozobryum@... wrote:

       

      We now have in our project a half dozen, possibly related individuals with identical or similar 67-marker results, but three different surnames.  Two of them have tested as L44+.  One of the L44's and another (not yet SNP tested), have now been reported as having DYS636=12.1   Three more in this cluster are waiting for results for this marker.  Does anyone have thoughts on partial repeats as indicators/pseudo SNPs, and also, has anyone else seen anything peculiar going on with this particular marker?

    • Charles Acree
      It s interesting that another U106 surname project is encountering success with microalleles. Thirty-one members of our project share a microallele, which is
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        It's interesting that another U106 surname project is encountering success with microalleles.  Thirty-one members of our project share a microallele, which is both distinguishing and enduring.  We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that arose sometime between the advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common Acree immigrant/progenitor was born in the English-Scottish border area.  We've discovered a few non-Acrees who match our marker results unmistakably - including the predictable microallele, and have been trying, with some success, to determine which of them are NPEs and which more likely share a common ancestor who lived before 1710 - possibly in the pre-surname era. 
         
        Charles Acree
         
        -----------------------------------------------------
         

        Sun Oct 6, 2013 12:00 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Charles Moore" cdmo29

         
         
        These are known as microalleles. 636 is an important marker in the otherwise L48*/L200 group, where it changes to 11. Every situation is different, so yours operates on its own, but it sounds like you can proceed on a presumption that the families involved share a common, presumably pre-surname ancestor
         
        On Oct 6, 2013, at 12:43 PM, ozobryum@comcast. net wrote
         
        We now have in our project a half dozen, possibly related individuals with identical or similar 67-marker results, but three different surnames. Two of them have tested as L44+. One of the L44's and another (not yet SNP tested), have now been reported as having DYS636=12.1 Three more in this cluster are waiting for results for this marker. Does anyone have thoughts on partial repeats as indicators/pseudo SNPs, and also, has anyone else seen anything peculiar going on with this particular marker?
      • tidmay
        I am interested in learning more about microalleles and the microallele that your group shares. Would it be something explained or discussed on your project
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          I am interested in learning more about microalleles and the microallele that your group shares.
          Would it be something explained or discussed on your project site or a family website? Thanks.

          Tim May

          --------------------------------------------
          On Mon, 10/7/13, Charles Acree <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

          Subject: [R1b1c_U106-S21] Re: Question about "partial repeat" in L44
          To: R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, October 7, 2013, 9:25 AM

          It's interesting that another
          U106 surname project is
          encountering success with microalleles.  Thirty-one
          members of
          our project share a microallele, which
          is both distinguishing and
          enduring.  We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that
          arose sometime
          between the advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common
          Acree
          immigrant/progenitor was born in the English-Scottish
          border area. 
          We've discovered a few non-Acrees who match
          our marker results
          unmistakably - including the
          predictable microallele, and have
          been trying, with some success, to determine which of
          them are NPEs and
          which more likely share a common ancestor who
          lived before 1710 -
          possibly in the pre-surname era. 
           
          Charles Acree
           
          -----------------------------------------------------
           

          Sun Oct 6, 2013 12:00 pm (PDT) .
          Posted by:
          "Charles
          Moore" cdmo29

           
           
          These are known as microalleles. 636
          is an important
          marker in the otherwise L48*/L200 group, where it changes to
          11. Every situation
          is different, so yours operates on its own, but it sounds
          like you can proceed
          on a presumption that the families involved share a common,
          presumably
          pre-surname ancestor
           
          On Oct 6, 2013, at 12:43 PM,
          ozobryum@comcast. net
          wrote
           
          We now have in our project a half
          dozen, possibly related
          individuals with identical or similar 67-marker results, but
          three different
          surnames. Two of them have tested as L44+. One of the
          L44's and another (not yet
          SNP tested), have now been reported as having DYS636=12.1
          Three more in this
          cluster are waiting for results for this marker. Does anyone
          have thoughts on
          partial repeats as indicators/pseudo SNPs, and also, has
          anyone else seen
          anything peculiar going on with this particular
          marker?
        • John M Rhodes
          Mr. Acree, it occurs to me that Acree, if Scottish, could have originally been Mcree, Macree, Macrea, McCree, ,McRee, etc. John M Rhodes
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Mr. Acree,  it occurs to me that Acree, if Scottish, could have originally been Mcree, Macree, Macrea, McCree, ,McRee, etc

            John M Rhodes

            On 2013-10-07, at 10:25 AM, "Charles Acree" <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

             

            It's interesting that another U106 surname project is encountering success with microalleles.  Thirty-one members of our project share a microallele, which is both distinguishing and enduring.  We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that arose sometime between the advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common Acree immigrant/progenitor was born in the English-Scottish border area.  We've discovered a few non-Acrees who match our marker results unmistakably - including the predictable microallele, and have been trying, with some success, to determine which of them are NPEs and which more likely share a common ancestor who lived before 1710 - possibly in the pre-surname era. 
             
            Charles Acree
             
            -----------------------------------------------------
             

            Sun Oct 6, 2013 12:00 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

            "Charles Moore" cdmo29

             
             
            These are known as microalleles. 636 is an important marker in the otherwise L48*/L200 group, where it changes to 11. Every situation is different, so yours operates on its own, but it sounds like you can proceed on a presumption that the families involved share a common, presumably pre-surname ancestor
             
            On Oct 6, 2013, at 12:43 PM, ozobryum@comcast. net wrote
             
            We now have in our project a half dozen, possibly related individuals with identical or similar 67-marker results, but three different surnames. Two of them have tested as L44+. One of the L44's and another (not yet SNP tested), have now been reported as having DYS636=12.1 Three more in this cluster are waiting for results for this marker. Does anyone have thoughts on partial repeats as indicators/pseudo SNPs, and also, has anyone else seen anything peculiar going on with this particular marker?

          • Charles Acree
            Thanks for your suggestion, John. It would become a more promising possibility if we had a worthwhile match within the large MacRae Clan DNA Project. I believe
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              Thanks for your suggestion, John. It would become a more promising possibility if we had a worthwhile match within the large MacRae Clan DNA Project. I believe that it's more likely that we Acrees descend from the historic Dacre clan in Cumbria.  Our surname variants in the UK are Acre(s), Aker(s) and Acker(s). So far, we've tested one of each in England, with no luck.

              Charles Acree

              ----------------------------------------------------------------

              Mon Oct 7, 2013 8:28 am (PDT) . Posted by: "John M Rhodes" johnmrhodes409

              Mr. Acree, it occurs to me that Acree, if Scottish, could have originally been Mcree, Macree, Macrea, McCree, ,McRee, etc.

              John M Rhodes

              On 2013-10-07, at 10:25 AM, "Charles Acree" <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

              It's interesting that another U106 surname project is encountering success with microalleles. Thirty-one members of our project share a microallele, which is both distinguishing and enduring. We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that arose sometime between the advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common Acree immigrant/progenitor was born in the English-Scottish border area. We've discovered a few non-Acrees who match our marker results unmistakably - including the predictable microallele, and have been trying, with some success, to determine which of them are NPEs and which more likely share a common ancestor who lived before 1710 - possibly in the pre-surname era.

            • Charles Acree
              Tim - Our microallelle is 13.2 at DYS385b. For discussion, see our independent Acree Project website at: http://acreetree.net/ydnaacree.html Charles Acree ...
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
              • 0 Attachment

                Tim - Our microallelle is 13.2 at DYS385b. For discussion, see our independent Acree Project website at:  http://acreetree.net/ydnaacree.html

                Charles Acree

                ------------------------------------------------------

                Mon Oct 7, 2013 7:40 am (PDT) . Posted by: "tidmay" tidmay7

                I am interested in learning more about microalleles and the microallele that your group shares. Would it be something explained or discussed on your project site or a family website? Thanks. Tim May

                On 2013-10-07, at 10:25 AM, "Charles Acree" <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

                It's interesting that another U106 surname project is encountering success with microalleles. Thirty-one members of our project share a microallele, which is both distinguishing and enduring. We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that arose sometime between the advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common Acree immigrant/progenitor was born in the English-Scottish border area. We've discovered a few non-Acrees who match our marker results unmistakably - including the predictable microallele, and have been trying, with some success, to determine which of them are NPEs and which more likely share a common ancestor who lived before 1710 - possibly in the pre-surname era.

              • Raymond Wing
                Would someone be interested in updating the Z306 portion of the Geno 2.0 spreadsheet
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Would someone be interested in updating the Z306 portion of the Geno 2.0 spreadsheet https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Av9lu-SZDcLodFR1Ump6a0lCTmlqUTNjd3Jwd2VIbUE#gid=5 with DF96 & DF98?  I haven't kept up to date on this branch of the tree.
                   
                  Ray


                • tidmay
                  Thanks, Charles. I will take a look. Tim ... On Mon, 10/7/13, Charles Acree wrote: Subject: [R1b1c_U106-S21] Re: Question about
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks, Charles. I will take a look.

                    Tim

                    --------------------------------------------
                    On Mon, 10/7/13, Charles Acree <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

                    Subject: [R1b1c_U106-S21] Re: Question about "partial repeat" in L44
                    To: R1b1c_U106-S21@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Monday, October 7, 2013, 2:18 PM

                    Tim - Our microallelle is 13.2 at DYS385b. For
                    discussion, see our
                    independent Acree Project website at:
                     http://acreetree.net/ydnaacree.html
                    Charles Acree
                    ------------------------------------------------------
                    Mon Oct 7, 2013 7:40 am (PDT) . Posted by: "tidmay" tidmay7

                    I am interested in learning more about microalleles and
                    the microallele that
                    your group shares. Would it be something explained or
                    discussed on your project
                    site or a family website? Thanks. Tim May
                    On 2013-10-07, at 10:25 AM, "Charles Acree"
                    <acreegenealogy@...> wrote:

                    It's interesting that another
                    U106 surname project is encountering success with
                    microalleles. Thirty-one
                    members of our project share a microallele, which is both
                    distinguishing and
                    enduring. We form, in effect, a subclade of Z159 that arose
                    sometime between the
                    advent of Z159 and c1710, when our common Acree
                    immigrant/progenitor was born in
                    the English-Scottish border area. We've discovered a few
                    non-Acrees who match
                    our marker results unmistakably - including the predictable
                    microallele, and
                    have been trying, with some success, to determine which of
                    them are NPEs and
                    which more likely share a common ancestor who lived before
                    1710 - possibly in
                    the pre-surname era.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.