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Resiliency And Innovation Go Hand In Hand

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  • Bonnie Jo Davis
    Article Submission Detail: Article Title: Resiliency And Innovation Go Hand In Hand Author Name: Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE Contact Email Address:
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2013
      Article Submission Detail:

      Article Title: Resiliency And Innovation Go Hand In Hand
      Author Name: Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE
      Contact Email Address: bonnie@...
      Word Count: 470
      Suggested Category: business
      Keywords: resiliency,resilient,innovation,innovative thinking,adaptability,change,resilient spirit,professional speaker,motivational speaker,business speaker,keynote speaker
      Description: A cornerstone of resiliency is adaptability: the skill of finding multiple solutions to an event, challenge, or opportunity. The emphasis is on the word "multiple". The more options one can create, the greater is one’s resiliency quotient.
      Copyright Date: 2013

      You have permission to publish this article in your ezine or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the byline and the article is included in it's entirety. If you use the article you are required to activate any links found in the article and the by-line. You may not use this article in any publication that is not-optin (spam).

      Complete Article with Resource Box at end:

      Resiliency And Innovation Go Hand In Hand

      A cornerstone of resiliency is adaptability: the skill of finding multiple solutions to an event, challenge, or opportunity. The emphasis is on the word "multiple". The more options one can create, the greater is one's resiliency quotient.

      However, innovative thinking requires a different mindset than analytical thinking. The latter strives for one right answer. Innovative thinking seeks many answers.

      To hone innovative thinking, practice asking many questions: What if? Why not? Why? Who says so? How about? Where could we?

      Equally important is to ask questions of people who might hold parts of the questions and parts of the answers. Likewise, amazing results can come if questions are asked of people who-at first glance-might be unrelated to the issue.

      Case in point: A power company in the Pacific Northwest was constantly plagued by broken power lines caused by heavy snow. Unfortunately, trying to get crews into the area was difficult and dangerous. One engineer commented, in jest, "Too bad we can't just blow the snow away." An administrative aide overheard the engineer and said, "When I was a nurse in a Vietnam M.A.S.H. unit, helicopters bearing the wounded would come in and the wash of the blades blew sand everywhere. Why not use a helicopter?" Duh! Why not?

      Innovative thinking also accepts the need for trial and error, risk and failure. It's all part of the process. Starbuck's CEO Howard Schultz tried selling a concocted carbonated coffee drink. It flopped. But it hasn't made Schultz stop pushing the innovation edges. The latest reports are that he is looking for products related to health and wellness as well as ways to create a mobile app that will allow a customer to be instantly recognized when he or she enters the shop!

      Innovation requires an acceptance that change is a fact of life. What is a great solution today might not work tomorrow. On a personal level, how one responds to an event in their twenties might be radically different in one's fifties. Priorities shift, experiences have multiplied, and with age comes the potential for a pasture of possibilities.

      Innovation and resiliency can stay the course if, built into each event, challenge, or opportunity is a willingness to celebrate small successes and failures. When rescue dogs and their handlers search for victims of tragedies like Hurricane Sandy, the handlers know their dogs become discouraged if they can't find someone. The handlers take turns gently covering one of the trainers and then release the dogs to go "find" the person. The dogs become re-invigorated with their success. If dogs need this encouragement, how much more do humans?

      Now, go innovate and celebrate your resilient spirit!

      © 2013, The Resiliency Group. Publication rights granted to all venues so long as article and by-line are reprinted intact and all links are made live.

      Eileen McDargh is a Hall of Fame motivational speaker, management consultant, resiliency expert and top thought-leader in leadership. Visit The Resiliency Group website at http://www.eileenmcdargh.com to get her free quarterly e-zine, read her blog and articles. Discover why hundreds of satisfied clients from all over the globe hire Eileen to keynote at their meetings and facilitate their retreats.
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