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Re: Porphyry

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  • John
    Hi Joe, Thanks for your help. I was actually interested in the original Greek as it would provide much better clues into the original meaning of the text.
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 2, 2013
      Hi Joe,

      Thanks for your help.  

      I was actually interested in the original Greek as it would provide much better clues into the original meaning of the text.  After a lot of searching I found this page: http://www.karmanor.gr/index.php?mid=2&lid=1&aid=53 which has the text.

      Note that the original Greek actually reads as follows (hope Yahoo doesn't corrupt this).  

      Εδώ αφού πέθανε ενταφιάστηκε ο Ζαν που Î"ία τον αποκαλούν

      There are two names for Zeus.  The first is Ζαν, Zan, apparently a very old name, as the origin and preserver of life.  The second is Î"ία, Dia, which has more of a connotation of division.  Plato seems to have commented on the dual nature of Zeus' names (Kratylos 395e-396b). http://www.hellenicgods.org/Zeus has really good notes on this (see the section titled "Zefs Unites, Zefs Divides" and corresponding footnote [2]).

      Interesting food for thought...

      Take care,

      John

      --- In Pythagorean-L@yahoogroups.com, Joe Flower wrote:
      >
      > John, it's me again.  (I just replied to your quest for a translation of Porphyry's biography of Pythagoras.)  I don't know why the interest in Taylor's translations or reporting, but I believe "Jove" is a Roman name (also called Jupiter and Jovis by the Romans), for the Greek god, Zeus.  (I'm not familiar with the name Zan.)  This seems especially significant since Rome did not exist at the time of Pythagoras or Porphyry.  I think in Taylor's time, it was the norm to use Greek and Roman names interchangeably for the same deity, and we still toss around the characterization of "Greco-Roman" as if it's one culture.  The Greeks and Romans were not the same at all.  And the Greek deities that Romans borrowed were naturally altered  by Roman cultural values and understandings, as well as the names changed. 
      >
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      >
      > >________________________________
      > > From: John john@...
      > >To: Pythagorean-L@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Monday, July 1, 2013 2:55 PM
      > >Subject: [Pythagorean-L] Re: Porphyry
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > 
      > >Does anyone still have a copy of the Life of Pythagoras by Porphyry in
      > >Greek? The link below no longer works. I'm looking in particular for
      > >the Greek original for the phrase which Taylor translates as "Zeus
      > >deceased here lies, whom men call Jove." It is of great interest to me
      > >to understand the actual original names he is translating into Zeus and
      > >Jove. Some commentators translate the first Zeus as Zan but I'd like to
      > >see the proof. [;)]
      > >Thanks!
      > >
      > >--- In Pythagorean-L@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Rafey" wrote:
      > >>
      > >> ACB and anyone else interested:
      > >>
      > >> http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/porphyry.pdf
      > >>
      > >> Rafey
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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