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Re: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?

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  • Eric Waltemate
    I ve cured 2 of them on the same day that they broke out.  Both were at the Tai Yang stage. ... From: rasqual9 Subject:
    Message 1 of 7 , May 1 8:22 AM
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      I've cured 2 of them on the same day that they broke out.  Both were at the Tai Yang stage.

      --- On Mon, 4/30/12, rasqual9 <bluegreendragon9@...> wrote:

      From: rasqual9 <bluegreendragon9@...>
      Subject: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?
      To: PulseDiagnosis@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, April 30, 2012, 9:15 AM

       

      This one's been on my mind forever...There's a much-told story about Chinese businessmen touring the US in the 70's (I think), who said that what struck them most about the country is that people thought that there was no cure for the common cold.
      I was pretty shocked when my first herb teacher in my second TCM school echoed conventional allopathic wisdom that head colds took about 2 weeks to run their course, and there wasn't much to hurry it along.
      Now, I know that when we hear 'common cold,' it could mean Wind/Heat, Wind/Cold, with or without Fire Toxin, cough, ear problems, body aches....I'm asking here about a Wind/cold that's turned hot, with congestion and fatigue.
      Both once last year, and just now, I caught one of these, and to my annoyance, was unable to banish it in a couple of days. Both times I shelled it with both patent (ITM) and granular herbs. My granular formulas were strong, 75-100g/day, heavy on the huang qin, jie geng, and churn xin lian. I know I lessened the colds' severity, but they both still ran on, in some form....about 2 weeks.

      I know the points to use, the herbs, all that. My question to this group is -How quickly do you find that you can resolve a 'common cold,' in a client of average immune function/upright qi? Do you go raw herbs (my plan for next time)? I'd like to give clients the straight dope.

    • stephen clipp
      Do you have an opinion on whether it was herbs or acupoints that did most of the work? I too have cleaned em up fast, really peeved I can t do it with mine,
      Message 2 of 7 , May 1 8:31 AM
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        Do you have an opinion on whether it was herbs or acupoints that did most of the work? 
        I too have cleaned 'em up fast, really peeved I can't do it with mine, especially, as I said, since I was taking formulas that you could clean a stove with. 



        To: PulseDiagnosis@yahoogroups.com
        From: ericwaltemate@...
        Date: Tue, 1 May 2012 08:22:55 -0700
        Subject: Re: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?

         
        I've cured 2 of them on the same day that they broke out.  Both were at the Tai Yang stage.

        --- On Mon, 4/30/12, rasqual9 <bluegreendragon9@...> wrote:

        From: rasqual9 <bluegreendragon9@...>
        Subject: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?
        To: PulseDiagnosis@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, April 30, 2012, 9:15 AM

         

        This one's been on my mind forever...There's a much-told story about Chinese businessmen touring the US in the 70's (I think), who said that what struck them most about the country is that people thought that there was no cure for the common cold.
        I was pretty shocked when my first herb teacher in my second TCM school echoed conventional allopathic wisdom that head colds took about 2 weeks to run their course, and there wasn't much to hurry it along.
        Now, I know that when we hear 'common cold,' it could mean Wind/Heat, Wind/Cold, with or without Fire Toxin, cough, ear problems, body aches....I'm asking here about a Wind/cold that's turned hot, with congestion and fatigue.
        Both once last year, and just now, I caught one of these, and to my annoyance, was unable to banish it in a couple of days. Both times I shelled it with both patent (ITM) and granular herbs. My granular formulas were strong, 75-100g/day, heavy on the huang qin, jie geng, and churn xin lian. I know I lessened the colds' severity, but they both still ran on, in some form....about 2 weeks.

        I know the points to use, the herbs, all that. My question to this group is -How quickly do you find that you can resolve a 'common cold,' in a client of average immune function/upright qi? Do you go raw herbs (my plan for next time)? I'd like to give clients the straight dope.


      • Chistopher Macie
        Hi, Try herbal decoction / tang (soup)! And take it hot (not burning, of course). Why? patents, granulars, custom tablets/capsules etc have to be digested,
        Message 3 of 7 , May 1 9:51 AM
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          Hi,

          Try herbal decoction / tang (soup)! And take it hot (not burning, of course).

          Why? patents, granulars, custom tablets/capsules etc have to be digested, then spread through the entire body/bloodstream, a minute proportion actually reaching the affected tissues (URI, lungs,...), and much delayed.

          Decoction & hot touches first the mouth,  gets into the mucosa and travels directly to the nasal membranes, throat surfaces, ears etc., delivering the herbal agents that support the immune and inflammatory (repair) activity directly at the site of the problem. Heat enhances the metabolic effect. Take often, if only small amounts.

          Can also add inhalation -- breath the fumes of the hot liquid before, with, after drinking; aerating nasal and bronchial surfaces with medicine.

          I also encourage using GanMaoLing, YinChao, etc. tablets in terms of taking just one, but dissolving it in the mouth. Again, the agents go via the mucosa directly to the battleground -- saliva to nasal, throat, ear, sinus membranes. And a single tablet via this route delivers much more to the relevant tissues than the 6, 8 or more tablets usually prescribed for ingestion.

          Compromise route: dissolve patents, granulars etc. in hot water and use, as above, as-if decoction.

          Acupuncture can help, settle the overall system -- e.g. shift focus from sympathetic stress to para-symthetic healing mode, but Chinese medicine was (and remains) herbal medicine. Remember, for all but the last century or so, 95+% of all the Chinese who lived through-out the empire (from 200BC) never even knew anything about acupuncture, which was an elitist, court medicine (requiring sophisticated metallurgy, hygiene, etc.). Medicine was (still very dominantly is) tang/food prescription from from mother, grandmother, the village herbalist, etc..  The great doctors were largely herbalists.

          Ted Kaptchuk told the story, back at PCOM ca. 1990, when he studied in Macau and visited HongKong once, he sought out, visited the practice of one of the most renowned practitioners; in some crowded back-alley part of the city, a mass of patients waiting to see the doctor, who asked a couple of questions, read the pulse, and then issued a prescription to assistants; then on to the next patient; just a couple of hours a day (he was old), but seeing hundreds of patients.

          And the late Dr. John Shen was of this kind of lineage. He actually learned acupuncture, but in the USA, later in life, from his wife.

          And so on...
          Chris Macie

          From: "rasqual9" <bluegreendragon9@...>
          To: PulseDiagnosis@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 7:15:09 AM
          Subject: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?

           

          This one's been on my mind forever...There's a much-told story about Chinese businessmen touring the US in the 70's (I think), who said that what struck them most about the country is that people thought that there was no cure for the common cold.
          I was pretty shocked when my first herb teacher in my second TCM school echoed conventional allopathic wisdom that head colds took about 2 weeks to run their course, and there wasn't much to hurry it along.
          Now, I know that when we hear 'common cold,' it could mean Wind/Heat, Wind/Cold, with or without Fire Toxin, cough, ear problems, body aches....I'm asking here about a Wind/cold that's turned hot, with congestion and fatigue.
          Both once last year, and just now, I caught one of these, and to my annoyance, was unable to banish it in a couple of days. Both times I shelled it with both patent (ITM) and granular herbs. My granular formulas were strong, 75-100g/day, heavy on the huang qin, jie geng, and churn xin lian. I know I lessened the colds' severity, but they both still ran on, in some form....about 2 weeks.

          I know the points to use, the herbs, all that. My question to this group is -How quickly do you find that you can resolve a 'common cold,' in a client of average immune function/upright qi? Do you go raw herbs (my plan for next time)? I'd like to give clients the straight dope.

        • Chistopher Macie
          The bit about the vast majority of all the Chinese thru the history of the empire having no exposure to acupuncture I learned from both Paul Unschuld and
          Message 4 of 7 , May 1 9:54 AM
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            The bit about the vast majority of all the Chinese thru the history of the empire having no exposure to acupuncture I learned from both Paul Unschuld and Jeffrey Yuen, independently.


            From: "Chistopher Macie" <cjmacie@...>
            To: PulseDiagnosis@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, May 1, 2012 9:51:38 AM
            Subject: Re: [PulseDiagnosis] Curing the Common Cold?

            Hi,

            Try herbal decoction / tang (soup)! And take it hot (not burning, of course).

            Why? patents, granulars, custom tablets/capsules etc have to be digested, then spread through the entire body/bloodstream, a minute proportion actually reaching the affected tissues (URI, lungs,...), and much delayed.

            Decoction & hot touches first the mouth,  gets into the mucosa and travels directly to the nasal membranes, throat surfaces, ears etc., delivering the herbal agents that support the immune and inflammatory (repair) activity directly at the site of the problem. Heat enhances the metabolic effect. Take often, if only small amounts.

            Can also add inhalation -- breath the fumes of the hot liquid before, with, after drinking; aerating nasal and bronchial surfaces with medicine.

            I also encourage using GanMaoLing, YinChao, etc. tablets in terms of taking just one, but dissolving it in the mouth. Again, the agents go via the mucosa directly to the battleground -- saliva to nasal, throat, ear, sinus membranes. And a single tablet via this route delivers much more to the relevant tissues than the 6, 8 or more tablets usually prescribed for ingestion.

            Compromise route: dissolve patents, granulars etc. in hot water and use, as above, as-if decoction.

            Acupuncture can help, settle the overall system -- e.g. shift focus from sympathetic stress to para-symthetic healing mode, but Chinese medicine was (and remains) herbal medicine. Remember, for all but the last century or so, 95+% of all the Chinese who lived through-out the empire (from 200BC) never even knew anything about acupuncture, which was an elitist, court medicine (requiring sophisticated metallurgy, hygiene, etc.). Medicine was (still very dominantly is) tang/food prescription from from mother, grandmother, the village herbalist, etc..  The great doctors were largely herbalists.

            Ted Kaptchuk told the story, back at PCOM ca. 1990, when he studied in Macau and visited HongKong once, he sought out, visited the practice of one of the most renowned practitioners; in some crowded back-alley part of the city, a mass of patients waiting to see the doctor, who asked a couple of questions, read the pulse, and then issued a prescription to assistants; then on to the next patient; just a couple of hours a day (he was old), but seeing hundreds of patients.

            And the late Dr. John Shen was of this kind of lineage. He actually learned acupuncture, but in the USA, later in life, from his wife.

            And so on...
            Chris Macie
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