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slippery PLB and plant sterols

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  • WMorris116@AOL.COM
    Dear friends, Below is some information related to findings of a slippery sensation in the pelvic-lower body position. From a topogrphical point of view,
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 3, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear friends,

      Below is some information related to findings of a slippery sensation in the pelvic-lower body position. From a topogrphical point of view, rolling proximally is the is water portion of any position. The left 3rd-chi-proximal position
      is also water so this is water-water. The slippery quality is earth....that is....earth is affecting water and dampness is accumulating in the prostate. Consider fu ling and shan yao as agents that can help.

      Will
                   ____________________________________________________

                         ARBOR CLINICAL NUTRITION UPDATES ©
                   ____________________________________________________


      This week we consider a trial and a meta-analysis of the therapeutic use of
      plant sterols in benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).

      As always, you are welcome to share this email with health professional
      colleagues. Should they wish to subscribe themselves, instructions appear
      at the end, as do those for changing your own subscription details.

      Kind regards,

      Editorial team,
      Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates
      http://arborcom.com

             ____________________________________________________
                       NUTRITION RESEARCH REVIEW



      Study 1: Meta-analysis
      ----------------------------------
      A meta-analysis carried out under the Cochrane Collaboration protocol
      showed that the use of beta-sitosterol for BPH is effective both
      subjectively and objectively.

      Subjects and methods: The authors combined results from 4 trials involving
      519 men with BPH, with interventions lasting from 4 to 26 weeks.

      Results: There were significant improvements in symptoms and urine flow
      dynamics in all trials, and without reducing prostate size. See Table.

      Table: Weighted mean differences from meta-analysis

             WMD        95%CI        Number of trials
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      IPSS *        4.9 IPSS points  (-6.3 to -3.5)         2
      Peak urine flow      3.91 ml/sec     (0.91 to 6.90)        4
      Residual volume     -28.62 ml     (-41. 42 to -15.83)     4

      * = International prostate symptom score

      Reference: Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2000;(2):CD001043

      Study 2: Clinical trial
      ------------------------------
      The benefits of using the plant sterol beta-sitosterol as treatment for BPH
      are ongoing over at least 18 months, according to German research.

      Subjects: 200 patients with symptomatic BPH were recruited originally. 117
      of these patients were available for follow-up at 18 months after original
      enrollment.

      Method: In the original randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial,
      patients were treated with either beta-sitosterol (60 mg/day) or placebo
      for 6 months. Thereafter, blinding was stopped and subjects invited to
      continue the therapy on an ongoing basis.

      Results: In the original trial, patients on active treament had had a
      significant decreases in symptoms, mean residual urine volume and increase
      in peak urine flow (ref. a).

      After 18 months, those who were on active treatment and had continued had
      no deterioration in their symptoms of urodynamics. Those who had been on
      active treatment but subsequently ceased active treatment had slightly
      worse symptoms and mean residual urine volume but maintained their previous
      peak urine flow.

      Those who had been on placebo and not taken up active treatment had no
      improvement in their symptoms or urodynamics. Those who had been on placebo
      but taken up active treatment had improvements similar in degree to the
      originally active group (ref. b).

      References:
      a. Lancet 1995 Jun 17;345(8964):1529-32
      b. BJU Int 2000 May;85(7):842-6


      COMMENTARY
      In an earlier issue (#132 on plant sterols and cholesterol) we explained
      that plant or phyto-sterols are substances (such as beta-sitosterol and its
      glycoside, beta-sitosterolin) which are found in the normal diet and which
      have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol. Food manufacturers have
      added them to some processed foods.

      As the meta-analysis makes clear, a small number of trials have produced
      consistent results showing that these compounds can be successfully used to
      treat the symptoms and urodynamic changes of BPH.  Side-effects have not
      been a problem.

      The mechanism for this effect is not clear, but there are severeal feasible
      possibilities. In animals, plant sterols have shown anti-inflammatory,
      anti-neoplastic, anti-pyretic, and immune-modulating properties (ref. 1).
      Of these, the anti-inflammatory actions are the most likely to be relevant
      to BPH. In a human trial, plant sterols countered the inflammatory
      post-exertion response to marathon running (ref.2).

      More specific to the prostate, beta-sitosterol had a modulating effect in
      vitro on prostatic growth factor (beta 1) and the activity of a protein
      kinase (C alpha) in primary prostate stromal cell cultures (ref.3)

      There is little evidence as yet as to whether this positive influence of
      plant sterols will extend to protective or therapeutic benefits for
      prostate cancer. There is some epidemiological and animal evidence to
      support this notion, although the epidemiology is complicated by the fact
      that plant sterols are just one type of phytoestrogen, a class of nutrient
      with known protective association against prostate cancer (ref. 6).

      Possible mechanisms of any specific phytosterol effect include membrane
      modulation and stimulation of apoptosis of prostatic cancer cells and
      immune stimulation (ref. 4,5). There is also some evidence that
      phytosterols may help in the prevention of other forms of cancer as well,
      such as breast cancer (ref. 7).

      WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR THE CLINICIAN?
      Plant sterols are clearly useful substances that offer an apparently safe
      and effective mode of treatment for patients with BPH. They can be taken in
      natural food, in some specially enriched food products and as direct
      supplements. There is some epidemiological and animal and laboratory
      evidence that they may be protective against prostate cancer, but as yet no
      clinical trials.

      References:
      1. Altern Med Rev 1999 Jun;4(3):170-7
      2. Int J Sports Med 1999 May;20(4):258-62
      3. Eur Urol 2000 Jun;37(6):735-41
      4. Nutr Cancer 1999;33(1):20-5
      5. J Nutr 2000 Sep;130(9):2127-30
      6. Eur J Cancer Prev 2001 Dec;10(6):507-13
      7. Int J Mol Med 2000 May;5(5):541-5

              ____________________________________________________
                              Disclaimer, terms of use and copyright

      Your reading or otherwise using of this Update in any form (including
      reading or using the Acrobat document version sent with this email)
      constitutes your agreement to the disclaimer and terms of use on our web
      site at http://arborcom.com/disclaim2.htm. The disclaimer and terms of use
      can also be obtained by requesting it from us via email to <upT@...> .

      © This Update in all media and languages is copyright Arbor Communications
      PTL 2002
               ____________________________________________________
                             SUBSCRIBING INSTRUCTIONS


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                 Please refer to the disclaimer and terms of use on our web site at
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    • Alan Fairley & Margaret Olmsted
      Will Is your upcoming pulse diagnosis class the same as the one I took on volumes? Margaret Olmsted ... From: WMorris116@AOL.COM [mailto:WMorris116@AOL.COM]
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 4, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Will
         
        Is your upcoming pulse diagnosis class the same as the one I took on volumes?
         
        Margaret Olmsted
        -----Original Message-----
        From: WMorris116@... [mailto:WMorris116@...]
        Sent: Sunday, November 03, 2002 9:05 PM
        To: pulsediagnosis@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PulseDiagnosis] slippery PLB and plant sterols

        Dear friends,

        Below is some information related to findings of a slippery sensation in the pelvic-lower body position. From a topogrphical point of view, rolling proximally is the is water portion of any position. The left 3rd-chi-proximal position
        is also water so this is water-water. The slippery quality is earth....that is....earth is affecting water and dampness is accumulating in the prostate. Consider fu ling and shan yao as agents that can help.

        Will
                     ____________________________________________________

                           ARBOR CLINICAL NUTRITION UPDATES ©
                     ____________________________________________________


        This week we consider a trial and a meta-analysis of the therapeutic use of
        plant sterols in benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).

        As always, you are welcome to share this email with health professional
        colleagues. Should they wish to subscribe themselves, instructions appear
        at the end, as do those for changing your own subscription details.

        Kind regards,

        Editorial team,
        Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates
        http://arborcom.com

               ____________________________________________________
                         NUTRITION RESEARCH REVIEW



        Study 1: Meta-analysis
        ----------------------------------
        A meta-analysis carried out under the Cochrane Collaboration protocol
        showed that the use of beta-sitosterol for BPH is effective both
        subjectively and objectively.

        Subjects and methods: The authors combined results from 4 trials involving
        519 men with BPH, with interventions lasting from 4 to 26 weeks.

        Results: There were significant improvements in symptoms and urine flow
        dynamics in all trials, and without reducing prostate size. See Table.

        Table: Weighted mean differences from meta-analysis

               WMD        95%CI        Number of trials
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        IPSS *        4.9 IPSS points  (-6.3 to -3.5)         2
        Peak urine flow      3.91 ml/sec     (0.91 to 6.90)        4
        Residual volume     -28.62 ml     (-41. 42 to -15.83)     4

        * = International prostate symptom score

        Reference: Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2000;(2):CD001043

        Study 2: Clinical trial
        ------------------------------
        The benefits of using the plant sterol beta-sitosterol as treatment for BPH
        are ongoing over at least 18 months, according to German research.

        Subjects: 200 patients with symptomatic BPH were recruited originally. 117
        of these patients were available for follow-up at 18 months after original
        enrollment.

        Method: In the original randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial,
        patients were treated with either beta-sitosterol (60 mg/day) or placebo
        for 6 months. Thereafter, blinding was stopped and subjects invited to
        continue the therapy on an ongoing basis.

        Results: In the original trial, patients on active treament had had a
        significant decreases in symptoms, mean residual urine volume and increase
        in peak urine flow (ref. a).

        After 18 months, those who were on active treatment and had continued had
        no deterioration in their symptoms of urodynamics. Those who had been on
        active treatment but subsequently ceased active treatment had slightly
        worse symptoms and mean residual urine volume but maintained their previous
        peak urine flow.

        Those who had been on placebo and not taken up active treatment had no
        improvement in their symptoms or urodynamics. Those who had been on placebo
        but taken up active treatment had improvements similar in degree to the
        originally active group (ref. b).

        References:
        a. Lancet 1995 Jun 17;345(8964):1529-32
        b. BJU Int 2000 May;85(7):842-6


        COMMENTARY
        In an earlier issue (#132 on plant sterols and cholesterol) we explained
        that plant or phyto-sterols are substances (such as beta-sitosterol and its
        glycoside, beta-sitosterolin) which are found in the normal diet and which
        have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol. Food manufacturers have
        added them to some processed foods.

        As the meta-analysis makes clear, a small number of trials have produced
        consistent results showing that these compounds can be successfully used to
        treat the symptoms and urodynamic changes of BPH.  Side-effects have not
        been a problem.

        The mechanism for this effect is not clear, but there are severeal feasible
        possibilities. In animals, plant sterols have shown anti-inflammatory,
        anti-neoplastic, anti-pyretic, and immune-modulating properties (ref. 1).
        Of these, the anti-inflammatory actions are the most likely to be relevant
        to BPH. In a human trial, plant sterols countered the inflammatory
        post-exertion response to marathon running (ref.2).

        More specific to the prostate, beta-sitosterol had a modulating effect in
        vitro on prostatic growth factor (beta 1) and the activity of a protein
        kinase (C alpha) in primary prostate stromal cell cultures (ref.3)

        There is little evidence as yet as to whether this positive influence of
        plant sterols will extend to protective or therapeutic benefits for
        prostate cancer. There is some epidemiological and animal evidence to
        support this notion, although the epidemiology is complicated by the fact
        that plant sterols are just one type of phytoestrogen, a class of nutrient
        with known protective association against prostate cancer (ref. 6).

        Possible mechanisms of any specific phytosterol effect include membrane
        modulation and stimulation of apoptosis of prostatic cancer cells and
        immune stimulation (ref. 4,5). There is also some evidence that
        phytosterols may help in the prevention of other forms of cancer as well,
        such as breast cancer (ref. 7).

        WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR THE CLINICIAN?
        Plant sterols are clearly useful substances that offer an apparently safe
        and effective mode of treatment for patients with BPH. They can be taken in
        natural food, in some specially enriched food products and as direct
        supplements. There is some epidemiological and animal and laboratory
        evidence that they may be protective against prostate cancer, but as yet no
        clinical trials.

        References:
        1. Altern Med Rev 1999 Jun;4(3):170-7
        2. Int J Sports Med 1999 May;20(4):258-62
        3. Eur Urol 2000 Jun;37(6):735-41
        4. Nutr Cancer 1999;33(1):20-5
        5. J Nutr 2000 Sep;130(9):2127-30
        6. Eur J Cancer Prev 2001 Dec;10(6):507-13
        7. Int J Mol Med 2000 May;5(5):541-5

                ____________________________________________________
                                Disclaimer, terms of use and copyright

        Your reading or otherwise using of this Update in any form (including
        reading or using the Acrobat document version sent with this email)
        constitutes your agreement to the disclaimer and terms of use on our web
        site at http://arborcom.com/disclaim2.htm. The disclaimer and terms of use
        can also be obtained by requesting it from us via email to <upT@...> .

        © This Update in all media and languages is copyright Arbor Communications
        PTL 2002
                 ____________________________________________________
                               SUBSCRIBING INSTRUCTIONS


        BECOMING A SUBSCRIBER
        If you would like to receive the Clinical Nutrition Updates in your own
        name, please send us a request email to <updatD@...>. This is a
        FREE service to health professionals and students.

        Include details of: your name, email address, the country where you live,
        the institution you are associated with (if relevant) and your professional
        background. The Updates are available in English, Spanish, Portuguese,
        French, Russian, Korean and Japanese.

        IF YOU WANT TO CHANGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS:
        This section only applies to existing subscribers. The process is
        automated, so please follow the instructions EXACTLY or your request will
        unfortunately NOT be processed.

             -  To REQUEST the plain text email (NOT graphic Acrobat) version :
           1. Send an email to <change@...>.
         2.  In the `Subject:' line, put ONLY the words "NO Acrobat" followed by
        the email address under which you are subscribed.

        (For example: Subject: NO Acrobat smith@...     )

              - To CANCEL your subscription :
           1. Send an email to <change@...>.
           2.  In the `Subject:' line, put ONLY the word "UNSUB" followed by the
        email address under which you are subscribed.

        (for example: Subject: UNSUB smith@...      )

              - To CHANGE EMAIL ADDRESS:
           1. Send an email to <change@...>.
           2.  In the `Subject:' line, put ONLY the words "CHANGE EMAIL"
           3. In the body of the email, put ONLY
                       Old: your old email address
                       New: your new email address

        (Note: The words "old:" and "new:" MUST appear or the change will not be made.
           for example:     
               old:  smith@...
               new: smith@...             )

        We don't guarantee to process changes immediately, so plan ahead!
         ____________________________________________________
                     Disclaimer, terms of use and copyright
                   Please refer to the disclaimer and terms of use on our web site at
        http://arborcom.com/disclaim2.htm. If you do not have access to the web,
        you can obtain these terms of use by emailing us at <upD@...>

        © This Update is copyright Arbor Communications PTL 2002

        The mission of this group is to provide a forum for the discussion of pulse diagnosis so that a depth of understanding is furthered.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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      • Will Morris
        Maragaret - Yes ...it is the eight extraordinary vessels, the night time wei qi flow, the daytime wei qi flow, the compass method and the 6 channel method of
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 4, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Maragaret -

          Yes ...it is the eight extraordinary vessels, the night time wei qi
          flow, the daytime wei qi flow, the compass method and the 6 channel
          method of Wang Shu-he

          Will

          Alan Fairley & Margaret Olmsted wrote:

          > Will
          >
          >
          >
          > Is your upcoming pulse diagnosis class the same as the one I took on
          > volumes?
          >
          >
          >
          > Margaret Olmsted
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: WMorris116@... [mailto:WMorris116@...]
          > Sent: Sunday, November 03, 2002 9:05 PM
          > To: pulsediagnosis@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [PulseDiagnosis] slippery PLB and plant sterols
          >
          > Dear friends,
          >
          > Below is some information related to findings of a slippery
          > sensation in the pelvic-lower body position. From a topogrphical
          > point of view, rolling proximally is the is water portion of any
          > position. The left 3rd-chi-proximal position
          > is also water so this is water-water. The slippery quality is
          > earth....that is....earth is affecting water and dampness is
          > accumulating in the prostate. Consider fu ling and shan yao as
          > agents that can help.
          >
          > Will
          > ____________________________________________________
          >
          > ARBOR CLINICAL NUTRITION UPDATES ©
          > ____________________________________________________
          >
          >
          > This week we consider a trial and a meta-analysis of the
          > therapeutic use of
          > plant sterols in benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).
          >
          > As always, you are welcome to share this email with health
          > professional
          > colleagues. Should they wish to subscribe themselves, instructions
          > appear
          > at the end, as do those for changing your own subscription details.
          >
          > Kind regards,
          >
          > Editorial team,
          > Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates
          > http://arborcom.com
          >
          > ____________________________________________________
          > NUTRITION RESEARCH REVIEW
          >
          >
          >
          > Study 1: Meta-analysis
          > ----------------------------------
          > A meta-analysis carried out under the Cochrane Collaboration protocol
          > showed that the use of beta-sitosterol for BPH is effective both
          > subjectively and objectively.
          >
          > Subjects and methods: The authors combined results from 4 trials
          > involving
          > 519 men with BPH, with interventions lasting from 4 to 26 weeks.
          >
          > Results: There were significant improvements in symptoms and urine
          > flow
          > dynamics in all trials, and without reducing prostate size. See
          > Table.
          >
          > Table: Weighted mean differences from meta-analysis
          >
          > WMD 95%CI Number of trials
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > IPSS * 4.9 IPSS points (-6.3 to -3.5) 2
          > Peak urine flow 3.91 ml/sec (0.91 to 6.90) 4
          > Residual volume -28.62 ml (-41. 42 to -15..83) 4
          >
          > * = International prostate symptom score
          >
          > Reference: Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2000;(2):CD001043
          >
          > Study 2: Clinical trial
          > ------------------------------
          > The benefits of using the plant sterol beta-sitosterol as
          > treatment for BPH
          > are ongoing over at least 18 months, according to German research.
          >
          > Subjects: 200 patients with symptomatic BPH were recruited
          > originally. 117
          > of these patients were available for follow-up at 18 months after
          > original
          > enrollment.
          >
          > Method: In the original randomised, placebo-controlled clinical
          > trial,
          > patients were treated with either beta-sitosterol (60 mg/day) or
          > placebo
          > for 6 months. Thereafter, blinding was stopped and subjects
          > invited to
          > continue the therapy on an ongoing basis.
          >
          > Results: In the original trial, patients on active treament had had a
          > significant decreases in symptoms, mean residual urine volume and
          > increase
          > in peak urine flow (ref. a).
          >
          > After 18 months, those who were on active treatment and had
          > continued had
          > no deterioration in their symptoms of urodynamics. Those who had
          > been on
          > active treatment but subsequently ceased active treatment had
          > slightly
          > worse symptoms and mean residual urine volume but maintained their
          > previous
          > peak urine flow.
          >
          > Those who had been on placebo and not taken up active treatment
          > had no
          > improvement in their symptoms or urodynamics. Those who had been
          > on placebo
          > but taken up active treatment had improvements similar in degree
          > to the
          > originally active group (ref. b).
          >
          > References:
          > a. Lancet 1995 Jun 17;345(8964):1529-32
          > b.. BJU Int 2000 May;85(7):842-6
          >
          >
          > COMMENTARY
          > In an earlier issue (#132 on plant sterols and cholesterol) we
          > explained
          > that plant or phyto-sterols are substances (such as
          > beta-sitosterol and its
          > glycoside, beta-sitosterolin) which are found in the normal diet
          > and which
          > have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol. Food
          > manufacturers have
          > added them to some processed foods.
          >
          > As the meta-analysis makes clear, a small number of trials have
          > produced
          > consistent results showing that these compounds can be
          > successfully used to
          > treat the symptoms and urodynamic changes of BPH. Side-effects
          > have not
          > been a problem.
          >
          > The mechanism for this effect is not clear, but there are severeal
          > feasible
          > possibilities. In animals, plant sterols have shown
          > anti-inflammatory,
          > anti-neoplastic, anti-pyretic, and immune-modulating properties
          > (ref. 1).
          > Of these, the anti-inflammatory actions are the most likely to be
          > relevant
          > to BPH. In a human trial, plant sterols countered the inflammatory
          > post-exertion response to marathon running (ref.2).
          >
          > More specific to the prostate, beta-sitosterol had a modulating
          > effect in
          > vitro on prostatic growth factor (beta 1) and the activity of a
          > protein
          > kinase (C alpha) in primary prostate stromal cell cultures (ref.3)
          >
          > There is little evidence as yet as to whether this positive
          > influence of
          > plant sterols will extend to protective or therapeutic benefits for
          > prostate cancer. There is some epidemiological and animal evidence to
          > support this notion, although the epidemiology is complicated by
          > the fact
          > that plant sterols are just one type of phytoestrogen, a class of
          > nutrient
          > with known protective association against prostate cancer (ref. 6).
          >
          > Possible mechanisms of any specific phytosterol effect include
          > membrane
          > modulation and stimulation of apoptosis of prostatic cancer cells and
          > immune stimulation (ref. 4,5). There is also some evidence that
          > phytosterols may help in the prevention of other forms of cancer
          > as well,
          > such as breast cancer (ref. 7).
          >
          > WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR THE CLINICIAN?
          > Plant sterols are clearly useful substances that offer an
          > apparently safe
          > and effective mode of treatment for patients with BPH. They can be
          > taken in
          > natural food, in some specially enriched food products and as direct
          > supplements. There is some epidemiological and animal and laboratory
          > evidence that they may be protective against prostate cancer, but
          > as yet no
          > clinical trials.
          >
          > References:
          > 1. Altern Med Rev 1999 Jun;4(3):170-7
          > 2. Int J Sports Med 1999 May;20(4):258-62
          > 3. Eur Urol 2000 Jun;37(6):735-41
          > 4. Nutr Cancer 1999;33(1):20-5
          > 5. J Nutr 2000 Sep;130(9):2127-30
          > 6. Eur J Cancer Prev 2001 Dec;10(6):507-13
          > 7. Int J Mol Med 2000 May;5(5):541-5
          >
          > ____________________________________________________
          > Disclaimer, terms of use and copyright
          >
          > Your reading or otherwise using of this Update in any form (including
          > reading or using the Acrobat document version sent with this email)
          > constitutes your agreement to the disclaimer and terms of use on
          > our web
          > site at http://arborcom.com/disclaim2.htm.. The disclaimer and
          > terms of use
          > can also be obtained by requesting it from us via email to
          > <upT@...> .
          >
          > © This Update in all media and languages is copyright Arbor
          > Communications
          > PTL 2002
          > ____________________________________________________
          > SUBSCRIBING INSTRUCTIONS
          >
          >
          > BECOMING A SUBSCRIBER
          > If you would like to receive the Clinical Nutrition Updates in
          > your own
          > name, please send us a request email to <updatD@...>.
          > This is a
          > FREE service to health professionals and students.
          >
          > Include details of: your name, email address, the country where
          > you live,
          > the institution you are associated with (if relevant) and your
          > professional
          > background. The Updates are available in English, Spanish,
          > Portuguese,
          > French, Russian, Korean and Japanese.
          >
          > IF YOU WANT TO CHANGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS:
          > This section only applies to existing subscribers. The process is
          > automated, so please follow the instructions EXACTLY or your
          > request will
          > unfortunately NOT be processed.
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          > - To REQUEST the plain text email (NOT graphic Acrobat)
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