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The lack of prog at Live Aid

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  • biceeichler
    I ve been completely overdosing on the Live Aid concert over the past few weeks. I finally finished putting together DVDs of video of (almost) the entire
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 8, 2010
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      I've been completely overdosing on the Live Aid
      concert over the past few weeks. I finally
      finished putting together DVDs of video of (almost)
      the entire show, and now I'm downloading the
      radio broadcast and burning that to CD.

      The one thing I've noticed is that nearly every
      style of music that existed in 1985 was represented
      somewhere during Live Aid...except prog rock.

      There was, of course, tons of 80s pop bands, and
      there was rap from Run DMC, R&B from Ashford and
      Simpson (and Teddy Pendergrass), a touch of disco
      from Patti LaBelle, dance routines from Madonna,
      country music in Neil Young's "Nothing is Perfect",
      folk from Bob Dylan, Motown from the Four Tops and
      the Temptations, blues from BB King and George
      Thorogood, jazz from Bradford Marsalis (playing
      with Sting) and even classic rock "dinosaurs" like
      the Who and Led Zeppelin.

      But they closest they got to prog was having Phil
      Collins do a solo piano version of "In the Air
      Tonight". Unless you count "Stairway to Heaven"
      or Dire Strait's extended version of "Sultans of
      Swing".

      Kind of shows how wildly unpopular prog was in the
      80s. Why no 90125 line-up of Yes? Why no members
      of ELP or King Crimson? I was going to say "why
      no Pink Floyd", but obviously they were broken up
      at the time and Gilmour actually did play with
      Bryan Ferry (how did that come about?) It just
      seems odd that progressive/art rock wasn't in
      there somewhere.

      -- Bob
    • Storey, Scott D. (MSFC-IS20)
      I’m guessing that Ferry didn’t do any Roxy Music songs then. If so, that probably would be as close to prog as anything at the concerts. Were the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 9, 2010
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        Re: [ProgAndOther] The lack of prog at Live Aid I’m guessing that Ferry didn’t do any Roxy Music songs then. If so, that probably would be as close to prog as anything at the concerts. Were the Psychedelic Furs at either of the concerts? They were pretty popular at that time. Some of their stuff is kind of proggy, to my ears anyway.

        -scott

        On 6/8/10 3:42 PM, "biceeichler" <eichler2@...> wrote:



        Kind of shows how wildly unpopular prog was in the
        80s.  Why no 90125 line-up of Yes?  Why no members
        of ELP or King Crimson?  I was going to say "why
        no Pink Floyd", but obviously they were broken up
        at the time and Gilmour actually did play with
        Bryan Ferry (how did that come about?)  It just
        seems odd that progressive/art rock wasn't in
        there somewhere.

        -- Bob

      • Rob McMonigal
        I think the answer is that by Live Aid, King Crimson was broken up, I think Yes was broken up or fighting between the two camps, and Rush, the only other big
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 9, 2010
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          I think the answer is that by Live Aid, King Crimson was broken up, I think Yes was broken up or fighting between the two camps, and Rush, the only other big enough band, certainly wouldn't be the type politically to support Live Aid.

          -Rob
        • T. J. Higgins
          ... Rush contributed a live version of Distant Early Warning to the Hear n Aid famine relief album. T.J.
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 9, 2010
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            On Wed, Jun 09, 2010 at 04:27:57PM -0400, Rob McMonigal wrote:
            > I think the answer is that by Live Aid, King Crimson was broken up, I think
            > Yes was broken up or fighting between the two camps, and Rush, the only
            > other big enough band, certainly wouldn't be the type politically to support
            > Live Aid.

            Rush contributed a live version of "Distant Early Warning" to
            the Hear'n Aid famine relief album.
            <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hear_%27n_Aid>

            T.J.
          • biceeichler
            ... I m not that familiar with Roxy Music (never really cared for the few songs that I ve heard). Here s what he played: Sensation Boys and Girls Slave to
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 9, 2010
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              --- In ProgAndOther@yahoogroups.com, "Storey, Scott D. (MSFC-IS20)" <scott.d.storey@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm guessing that Ferry didn't do any Roxy Music songs then.

              I'm not that familiar with Roxy Music (never really cared for
              the few songs that I've heard). Here's what he played:

              Sensation
              Boys and Girls
              Slave to Love
              Jealous Guy (John Lennon cover)


              > Were the Psychedelic Furs at either of the concerts?

              Nope. One of the few popular 80s British bands that weren't
              there. Wait, they were British, weren't they?

              -- Bob
            • biceeichler
              ... Yes was in between the 90125 and Big Generator albums, so they probably could have played if they had been asked. You d think Jon Anderson would be all
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 9, 2010
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                --- In ProgAndOther@yahoogroups.com, Rob McMonigal <trebro@...> wrote:
                >
                > I think the answer is that by Live Aid, King Crimson was broken up,
                > I think Yes was broken up or fighting between the two camps,
                > and Rush, the only other big enough band, certainly wouldn't be
                > the type politically to support Live Aid.


                Yes was in between the 90125 and Big Generator albums, so they
                probably could have played if they had been asked. You'd think
                Jon Anderson would be all over something like that.

                I knew Crimson wasn't active at the time, but I'm surprised
                that Fripp, Bruford, Levin or Belew weren't involved somehow.

                What would Rush have against feeding starving people? It wasn't
                really a "political" event anyway - not like Live 8 was 20 years
                later.

                -- Bob
              • Storey, Scott D. (MSFC-IS20)
                Those are Ferry’s songs. Yeah, Roxy broke up in ‘83, before the Live Aid concert, so it’s not too surprising that he’d distance himself from the band.
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 10, 2010
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                  Re: [ProgAndOther] Re: The lack of prog at Live Aid Those are Ferry’s songs. Yeah, Roxy broke up in ‘83, before the Live Aid concert, so it’s not too surprising that he’d distance himself from the band. The first two Roxy albums with Brian Eno are my favorites. But, I really like them all to some extent.

                  Yep, the Furs were British. I only have one album by them, Talk Talk Talk. It has the song Pretty In Pink on it, but there are two or three songs on there that sound prog-ish to me.

                  -scott

                  On 6/9/10 6:03 PM, "biceeichler" <eichler2@...> wrote:  


                  --- In ProgAndOther@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ProgAndOther%40yahoogroups.com> , "Storey, Scott D. (MSFC-IS20)" <scott.d.storey@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I'm guessing that Ferry didn't do any Roxy Music songs then.

                  I'm not that familiar with Roxy Music (never really cared for
                  the few songs that I've heard).  Here's what he played:

                  Sensation
                  Boys and Girls
                  Slave to Love
                  Jealous Guy (John Lennon cover)

                  > Were the Psychedelic Furs at either of the concerts?

                  Nope.  One of the few popular 80s British bands that weren't
                  there.  Wait, they were British, weren't they?

                  -- Bob

                   
                • stevesly@aol.com
                  I think us prog fans tend to look at the past with rose colored glasses. The fact is that although a few prog bands got to the point where they could tour and
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 11, 2010
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                    I think us prog fans tend to look at the past with rose colored glasses.  The fact is that although a few prog bands got to the point where they could tour and sell out large venues, it was still very much outside of the mainstream music industry.  I can remember in the early 80's as a progressive rock fan still feeling like a total outsider.  When I did meet someone else into Yes, Marillon or someone like that it was always a surprise.  I would say 80% of the people I knew at the time had very little interest in prog if they were aware of it at all.  I can even remember when huge albums like "The Wall" came out.  Although it sold very well I would say that it was still very alien to most of the people I knew who were into music. 
                     
                    I think the same reason there were no prog bands at Live Aid is today why there are so few prog bands in the Hall Of Fame.  No matter how big some of the bands got, it was and is even more so today totally a niche audience.
                     
                    Steve Sly



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: biceeichler <eichler2@...>
                    To: ProgAndOther@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, Jun 8, 2010 4:42 pm
                    Subject: [ProgAndOther] The lack of prog at Live Aid

                     

                    I've been completely overdosing on the Live Aid
                    concert over the past few weeks. I finally
                    finished putting together DVDs of video of (almost)
                    the entire show, and now I'm downloading the
                    radio broadcast and burning that to CD.

                    The one thing I've noticed is that nearly every
                    style of music that existed in 1985 was represented
                    somewhere during Live Aid...except prog rock.

                    There was, of course, tons of 80s pop bands, and
                    there was rap from Run DMC, R&B from Ashford and
                    Simpson (and Teddy Pendergrass), a touch of disco
                    from Patti LaBelle, dance routines from Madonna,
                    country music in Neil Young's "Nothing is Perfect",
                    folk from Bob Dylan, Motown from the Four Tops and
                    the Temptations, blues from BB King and George
                    Thorogood, jazz from Bradford Marsalis (playing
                    with Sting) and even classic rock "dinosaurs" like
                    the Who and Led Zeppelin.

                    But they closest they got to prog was having Phil
                    Collins do a solo piano version of "In the Air
                    Tonight". Unless you count "Stairway to Heaven"
                    or Dire Strait's extended version of "Sultans of
                    Swing".

                    Kind of shows how wildly unpopular prog was in the
                    80s. Why no 90125 line-up of Yes? Why no members
                    of ELP or King Crimson? I was going to say "why
                    no Pink Floyd", but obviously they were broken up
                    at the time and Gilmour actually did play with
                    Bryan Ferry (how did that come about?) It just
                    seems odd that progressive/art rock wasn't in
                    there somewhere.

                    -- Bob

                  • T. J. Higgins
                    ... Well put. To me, prog is like jazz in that it is more musicians music than fans music. T.J.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 11, 2010
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                      On Fri, Jun 11, 2010 at 09:38:11AM -0400, stevesly@... wrote:
                      >
                      > I think the same reason there were no prog bands at Live Aid is today why there are so few prog bands in the Hall Of Fame. No matter how big some of the bands got, it was and is even more so today totally a niche audience.

                      Well put. To me, prog is like jazz in that it is more musicians'
                      music than fans' music.

                      T.J.
                    • biceeichler
                      ... Funny you should mention Marillion - during one of the breaks between bands, on the BBC radio feed that I downloaded, they interview Fish. Which made me
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 12, 2010
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                        --- In ProgAndOther@yahoogroups.com, stevesly@... wrote:
                        >
                        > When I did meet someone else into Yes, Marillon


                        Funny you should mention Marillion - during one of the
                        breaks between bands, on the BBC radio feed that I
                        downloaded, they interview Fish. Which made me wonder
                        why Marillion didn't play Live Aid.

                        According to a couple web sites that I found, Marillion
                        was asked to take part in the "Do They Know It's Christmas"
                        single, but couldn't work it into their schedule because
                        they were on tour. When Live Aid was being planned they
                        volunteered to play, but were turned down because they
                        hadn't appeared on the single.

                        -- Bob
                      • stevesly@aol.com
                        In a message dated 6/12/2010 4:49:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, eichler2@comcast.net writes: I still think the bottom line was that Marillion was just not a
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 12, 2010
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                          In a message dated 6/12/2010 4:49:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, eichler2@... writes:
                           
                          I still think the bottom line was that Marillion was just not a big enough band with the mainstream rock community.  Yes, they got to a point where they could play relatively large venues in Europe and even did a few stadium gigs on the undercard of larger festivals, but to mainstream rock n roll..........there were probably many people who were not even aware that they existed.. 
                           
                          Steve Sly
                          When Live Aid was being planned they
                          volunteered to play, but were turned down because they
                          hadn't appeared on the single.
                           
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