Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Moisture in Tail Light Housing

Expand Messages
  • Know One
    Where is the most logical place to look for where water entered the rear turn signal housing? I don t see any cracks in the housing. Jeff 06 @ 240k mles
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 11
      Where is the most logical place to look for where water entered the rear turn signal housing?

      I don't see any cracks in the housing.

      Jeff '06 @ 240k mles
    • Anne Judge
      ... I see there have been no responses so far, so I ll share my experience, though I can t exactly answer the question. I had moisture (condensation on the
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 12
        On Mar 11, 2017, at 10:10 PM, Know One knowonelse@... [Prius-2G] <Prius-2G@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        > Where is the most logical place to look for where water entered the rear turn signal housing?
        > I don't see any cracks in the housing.

        I see there have been no responses so far, so I'll share my experience, though I can't exactly answer the question.

        I had moisture (condensation on the inside of the lens) in one tail light assembly for years. In our case the reason was obvious - while installing our hatch-mounted bicycle rack on our 2004, a buckle swung against the tail light and made a star crack in the lens. (It didn't seem that hard a strike but must have hit just right.) That's why I can't answer your question. :-)

        Though we had the condensation for years, all lights continued to function, and I never noticed the condensation being bad enough to make the lights appear dim. I don't know if this is your case.

        After many years (probably the better part of a decade) the brake LEDs on that side became dim. I don't know if it was due to the frequent high humidity (corrosion?) or not. They all still lit, and I drove like that until I failed inspection. At that point - last October - I bought an after-market replacement from Amazon ($70) and that seems to work fine.

        I never opened up the old assembly to figure out what went wrong.

        Anne

        P.S. I also failed for having 2 dead license plate bulbs. I replaced one but didn't know what he was talking about as the other seemed to work - until I slammed the hatch closed after changing the bulb, and both flickered out. I investigated and found that the sockets had spread and weren't gripping the bulbs. I was able to pinch them tighter and so far, so good, but the fact that it happened on both sides makes me think it's a (minor) design flaw, that the prongs are too weak to hold their shape for as long as the car can last.
      • Mon_Wah_Lee
        It could be from a broken seal and/or where the bulbs twist into the housing. When the light warms up and then cools down, moister from the air can condense in
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 14
          It could be from a broken seal and/or where the bulbs twist into the housing. When the light warms up and then cools down, moister from the air can condense in the housing.

          You can put some silicon around the housing seal and see if that resolves the problem.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.