Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Oldest solar observatory discovered in Peru

Expand Messages
  • mythisis@aol.com
    Oldest solar observatory discovered Ancient structures date back to the fourth century B.C. By Sara Goudarzi Staff writer Space.com Updated: 5:45 p.m. PT
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 7, 2007
      Oldest solar observatory discovered
      Ancient structures date back to the fourth century B.C.
      By Sara Goudarzi
      Staff writer
      Space.com
      Updated: 5:45 p.m. PT March 1, 2007

      The oldest solar observatory in the Americas has been discovered in coastal Peru, archaeologists announced today.

      The 2,300-year-old ceremonial complex featured the Towers of Chankillo, 13 towers running north to south along a low ridge and spread across 980 feet (300 meters) to form a toothed horizon that was used for solar observations.

      Researchers excavated the solar observatory between 2000 and 2003. They found buildings —in exact mirror position of each other — to the east and west of the towers with observation points for watching the sun rise and set over the toothed horizon.

      How it works
      In addition to the daily east-to-west motion, our sun appears to move eastward through the stars in a path known as the ecliptic over the course of a year. Also, the Earth’s axis is not perpendicular to the ecliptic but slanted by an angle of a little over 23 degrees. The combinations of these positions determine where the Sun is above our horizon day by day.

      At different times of the year one can observe the sun rise and set in different spots with respect to our horizon and for different lengths of time. For example, in the Northern Hemisphere, around the summer solstice — which falls on June 21 — the Sun rises highest in the sky and stays up longer.

      As viewed from the two observing points of Chankillo, the spread of towers along the horizon corresponds very closely to the range of movement of the rising and setting positions of the Sun over the year, the authors write in the March 2 issue of the journal Science.

      Once the Sun started to move away from any of its extreme positions, like the solstices or equinoxes, the towers and gaps between them provided a means to track the progress of the Sun up and down the horizon, to within a couple of days accuracy.

      “Chankillo is arguably the oldest solar calendar that can be identified as such with confidence within the Americas,” said lead study author Ivan Ghezzi from Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru.

      Tree-ring samples dated these structures back to the fourth century B.C.

      “Many indigenous American sites have been found to contain one or a few putative solar orientations,” Ghezzi said. “Chankillo, in contrast, provides a complete set of horizon markers and two unique and indisputable observation points.”

      Other discoveries
      At the end of a 131-foot-long corridor in the building to the west of the towers, the researchers found pottery, shells, and stone artifacts in an area possibly for commoners who participated in rituals linked to solar observations.

      Previous studies showed that the Incas — South American Indians who established an empire that once ranged from northern Ecuador to central Chile from 1100 to the 1530s—had built sites to mark solar observations by 1500.

      In comparison, the earliest portion of Stonehenge — megalithic ruins in southern England purported to correlate with the rising and setting of the sun and the moon — is said to have been completed around 3000 B.C.

      The new finding, however, puts sun cults in the Americas at an earlier date than the Incans.

      “Chankillo was built approximately 1,700 years before the Incas began their expansion,” Ghezzi said. “Now we know these practices are quite a bit older and were highly developed by Chankillo’s time.”

       
      The dew drips off the ferns, leaving them perched like umbrellas, for wildlife and fairy folk to hide under in the rainstorm, peeking out at the colors of the rainbow that dance in the sky.
      SL

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ExploringAncientMysteries
      _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PsychicAnimalCommunication/_
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DreamCatcherGardens
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pacnwseedsandtreasures




      AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.
    • james m. clark jr.
      [If] Yahuar Huquiz, [did indeed] give his 30 710 name to five intercalary days added to calendar to adjust spring equinox [perhaps this
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 12, 2007
        [If] Yahuar Huquiz, [did indeed] give his 30 710
        name to five intercalary days added to
        calendar to adjust spring equinox
        [perhaps this would explain] the major
        invasion from the southeast [building up
        to] Sinchi Ayar Manco [reign 7 360
        in which more or less seems like a
        long overdue revolt intended.
        Something like this would indeed
        cause a ruckes in the order of things
        which could also redefine the] true
        Florescent Era.



        64. Huaman Tacko Amauta 5 355

        65. Titu Yupanqui Pachacuti II -- --

        66. Titu Huaman Quitu -- 325

        67. Cozque Huaman Titu -- --

        68. Cuis Manco 50 275

        [which does't seem to have been
        truly resolved but now we may know why.]

        Now if I was just as knowledgable as some of you guys
        I'd just may have a slight chance in composing a critical time line.

        Thanks and be well,
        jamey


        --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, mythisis@... wrote:
        >
        > Oldest solar observatory discovered
        > Ancient structures date back to the fourth century B.C.
        >
        > By Sara Goudarzi
        > Staff writer
        > Space.com
        >
        > Updated: 5:45 p.m. PT March 1, 2007
        >
        >
        > The oldest solar observatory in the Americas has been discovered
        in coastal
        > Peru, archaeologists announced today.
        > The 2,300-year-old ceremonial complex featured the _Towers of
        Chankillo_
        > (http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/imagedisplay/img_display.php?
        pic=070301_chanki
        >
        llo_temple_02.jpg&cap=The+fortified+stone+temple+at+Chankillo.+Credit:
        +Nationa
        > l+Aerial+Service,+Peru) , 13 towers running north to south along a
        low ridge
        > and spread across 980 feet (300 meters) to form a toothed horizon
        that was
        > used for solar observations.
        > Researchers excavated the solar observatory between 2000 and 2003.
        They
        > found buildings â€"in exact mirror position of each other â€" to
        the east and west
        > of the towers with observation points for watching the sun rise
        and set over
        > the toothed horizon.
        > How it works
        > In addition to the daily east-to-west motion, our sun appears to
        move
        > eastward through the stars in a path known as the ecliptic over
        the course of a
        > year. Also, the _Earth’s axis_
        > (http://www.livescience.com/forcesofnature/050330_earth_tilt.html)
        is not perpendicular to the ecliptic but slanted by an
        > angle of a little over 23 degrees. The combinations of these
        positions determine
        > where the Sun is above our horizon day by day.
        > At different times of the year one can observe the sun rise and
        set in
        > different spots with respect to our horizon and for different
        lengths of time. For
        > example, in the Northern Hemisphere, around the summer solstice
        â€" which
        > falls on June 21 â€" the Sun rises highest in the sky and stays up
        longer.
        > As viewed from the two observing points of Chankillo, the spread
        of towers
        > along the horizon corresponds very closely to the range of
        movement of the
        > rising and setting positions of the Sun over the year, the authors
        write in the
        > March 2 issue of the journal Science.
        > Once the Sun started to move away from any of its extreme
        positions, like
        > the solstices or equinoxes, the towers and gaps between them
        provided a means
        > to track the progress of the Sun up and down the horizon, to
        within a couple
        > of days accuracy.
        > “Chankillo is arguably the oldest solar calendar that can be
        identified as
        > such with confidence within the Americas,” said lead study
        author Ivan Ghezzi
        > from Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru.
        > Tree-ring samples dated these structures back to the fourth
        century B.C.
        > “Many indigenous American sites have been found to contain one
        or a few
        > putative solar orientations,” Ghezzi said. “Chankillo, in
        contrast, provides a
        > complete set of horizon markers and two unique and indisputable
        observation
        > points.”
        > Other discoveries
        > At the end of a 131-foot-long corridor in the building to the west
        of the
        > towers, the researchers found pottery, shells, and stone artifacts
        in an area
        > possibly for commoners who participated in rituals linked to solar
        > observations.
        > Previous studies showed that the _Incas_
        > (http://www.livescience.com/history/ap_050811_incaknots.html) â€"
        South American Indians who established an empire
        > that once ranged from northern Ecuador to central Chile from 1100
        to the 1530s
        > â€"had built sites to mark solar observations by 1500.
        > In comparison, the earliest portion of Stonehenge â€" megalithic
        ruins in
        > southern England purported to correlate with the rising and
        setting of the sun
        > and the moon â€" is said to have been completed around 3000 B.C.
        > The new finding, however, puts sun cults in the Americas at an
        earlier date
        > than the Incans.
        > “Chankillo was built approximately 1,700 years before the Incas
        began their
        > expansion,” Ghezzi said. “Now we know these practices are
        quite a bit older
        > and were highly developed by Chankillo’s time.”
        >
        > The dew drips off the ferns, leaving them perched like umbrellas,
        for
        > wildlife and fairy folk to hide under in the rainstorm, peeking
        out at the colors
        > of the rainbow that dance in the sky.
        > SL
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ExploringAncientMysteries
        > _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PsychicAnimalCommunication/_
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DreamCatcherGardens
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pacnwseedsandtreasures
        > <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now
        offers free
        > email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
        > http://www.aol.com
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.