Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] peru by squier

Expand Messages
  • mike white
    author often mentions animals depicted on buildings, but fails to identify them.
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 1, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
       
         author often mentions animals depicted on buildings, but fails to identify them. 
       
       
         he thinks the ancient population was less than thought, but tells that every valley had an aquaduct and once was highly cultivated, with graves and human bones everywhere.  ruined buildings seem to be all over, many cyclopean.  every bit of useable land cultivated, with buildings and graves placed on bad ground.  the huacas seem to be used for burials, so that less surface was needed. 
         deserts contain the seeds and germs of flowers, fruits, and plants that flourished there long before, many now unknown, after a rare rain they spring forth. 
         the headland of arica is full of caves. 
         a usa warship at arica in 1868 was stranded high on the beach by a great quake, that moved south to north.  the sea receded then rose twice 34 ft above hightide, upon receding it carried debris of the town, people, and a train.  another great shake of 8 minutes was followed by a tsunami of 45 ft. 
         he found an alcohol stove and hammock indispensible in the highlands.  he also took a light mattress covered by a ground cloth, for when supports were lacking.  travel to the puno was rougher then, by mule train, before the rails were laid.  he was armed with rifle, pistol, and knife. 
         one wonders why more of the ancient buildings were not used, instead of huts.  it seems most of the ancient waterworks are out of service from neglect.  with industry peru could be wealthy from fields that could be restored to cultivation.  imagine if a man like fdr was in power, instituting public works, and the army corp of engineers were restoring waterworks.  they should encourage immigration with offers of land, to get new blood and fresh ideas. 
         chulpas were noticed above 9700 ft.  mule trains have bells to warn others to stop where the trail is wide enough to allow passing. 
       
          this is called an aymara skull in conformity to tschudi who said the aymara had elongated skulls.  author says it was from cradle boards, which i dont dispute, but it looks like two boards would be needed for this shape.  i have a feeling that aymara skulls were not dolichocephalic by nature. 
       
      mike
       
       
    • mike white
      mountain springs that appear clean are unsafe to drink, having a disease germ causing verruga. ive often wondered how these hybrid camelids came about. i just
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 1, 2007
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
         
           mountain springs that appear clean are unsafe to drink, having a disease germ causing verruga. 
           ive often wondered how these hybrid camelids came about.  i just noticed how much they look like a kangaroo.  possibly these two creatures somehow mixed. 
         
         
           author wounded a vicuna. 
           btw, off this topic briefly concerning iridium.  i think they could be in error about it being a direct product of space.  its logical that almost every type of meteorite has fallen to earth since the planet was formed, in fact it continues to expand every day from space debris.  the iridium is likely caused by tremendous heat decomposing certain rocks.  this could also result from volcanic action imho.  i wonder if the global drift deposits could also be volcanic in origin.  its known that sand, gravel, ash, and coal have been erupted from earth, as well as other volcanic products like lava and pumice, etc.  the dispersal would appear as widespread if many volcanoes were active.   its known that volcanoes were very active during the alaskan and siberian megafauna event, and said to be more so during a poleshift.  im curious if the bulk of red clay has an iridium component.  if the meteors burned up during entry to produce red iridium clay, then no impact, thence no tsunami.  yet the record proves tremendous waves carried the clay far inland.  seems more likely volcanoes and waves, associated with a poleshift decimated the species, and deposited the drift.  the clay layer and its minerals led to the creation of fossils.  not sure about 65 mya, but one might expect the same scenario circa 50,000 bce, 26,000 bce, and the 10,000 bce poleshifts.  let me ask this, is the lower midwest also covered by red clay like the southwest and the southeast?  i bet no, if correct we have another clue suggesting it was seabed during that event, which wasnt so long ago, for the deposit to be so near the surface.   alluvial areas must not count, but the remainder might tell the tale. 
           i am invited to give a talk at the next conference in ohio.  not sure if i can accept, not comfortable with public speaking, but i possibly could contribute some thoughts that challenge accepted history and geology, written as best as im able, that somebody else could present or pass around.  most of it has already been put forth in our archives for those interested in such conjecture.  i just wish our scientists would subject their own dogma and accepted theories, to the same stringent tests that they insist alternate ideas must pass.  it would make our job much easier!   lol
         
        mike
         
         
      • mike white
        the camelids choose to make their droppings in the same places, so the dung accumulates, and is often the only fuel to be found on the puno. the people should
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 2, 2007
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
           
             the camelids choose to make their droppings in the same places, so the dung accumulates, and is often the only fuel to be found on the puno.  the people should try to plant seedlings of certain trees where conditions are favorable.  its known that trees can grow above what we generally call the tree-line in elevation. 
             at a high tambo they were charged $64 for a thin soup, 2 chickens, and mule fodder.  exploitation of the tourists is not new in the andes.  bolivians paid $4 reluctantly. 
             like humboldt, he chose the wrong peak as the highest, naming sorata. 
            
           
             this link is the chapter on tiwanaku.  its upsetting that i cant locate humboldt's comments on it, but i will give squier's and that of tschudi next.  later i hope to find cieza de leon's work. 
             his photographer became ill and died within 24 hours of a 'baffling disease'.  [im amazed that they didnt assume it was soroche, and transport him quickly to a lower elevation.] 
             he spent a week at tiwanaku and made a plan of the works.  noting that many of the stones were used to construct the modern village.  he agrees it is the oldest and most perfect architecture in the americas.  the ruins cover about a square mile.  they are orientated within 10 degrees of present cardinal directions. 
           
            [ its as if the spaniards were determined in destroying this complex, in order to keep the court in spain from knowing the level of culture that had been reached in peru - bolivia.  most conquerors would have preserved and occupied such wonderful structures and monuments.  it would not surprise me if blocks with hieroglyphs were purposefully used in other modern buildings, with the inscriptions hidden within out of sight. ]
            
          mike
           
           
        • mike white
          author says the precision and skill of the cut stones of tiwanaku are unsurpassed. [ where else in the world is an example of a culture as high as this, that
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 2, 2007
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
             
               author says the precision and skill of the cut stones of tiwanaku are unsurpassed. 
             
             
              [ where else in the world is an example of a culture as high as this, that lacked writing?  its inconceivable! 
               they would not have built 10 degrees out of alignment, so its certain the ground has moved at least that much.  again we are merely considering the surface structures, while legends say two layers of buildings are beneath these. ] 
             
            mike
             
             
          • mike white
            note that huge blocks were fitted by mortise and tenon joinery. use was made of metalic pins and clamps joining stones. treasure hunters seem to have taken
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 2, 2007
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
               
                 note that huge blocks were fitted by mortise and tenon joinery.  use was made of metalic pins and clamps joining stones.  treasure hunters seem to have taken these away.  traditions tell of treasure vaults and long tunnels below the mound.  tschudi spoke of passages below.  d'orbigny drew plans of features in 1833 that were destroyed before squier arrived.  they used blasting powder to salvage stones to build la paz. 
               
               
                 i just bought one of two hc books for $8.35, a third of pb price.  grab it fast! 
               
                 www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext98/ hcpru10a.txt   cant open this in china
               
              MYTH, RITUAL, AND RELIGION

              by Andrew Lang
               
                 a stone 25.5 ft x 14 ft x 6.5 ft 
                 one gate opened to the ancient grave yard.  i hope we learn what was found in there. 
                 a 'symbolical slab' was thought to be a model representation of a building that may have stood at the complex.  it may detail the whole complex as it was. 
               
               
              mike
               
               
            • mike white
              wow, while searching for a copy of cieza de leon online for the group, i came upon dr cook s cv, very impressive works on peru. i invited him to join us, but
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 2, 2007
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                 
                   wow, while searching for a copy of cieza de leon online for the group, i came upon dr cook's cv, very impressive works on peru.  i invited him to join us, but no doubt he is a busy person. 
                 
                http://www.fiu.edu/~cookn/cookCV2004.htm
                 
                 
                 
                   i also invited dr fossa, a true genius. 
                 
                 
                book on quipu
                 
                 
                mike
                 
                 
              • mike white
                the gateway niches had holes for pivots where doors had swung. two giant stone idols had stood near the fortress in 1838, but fools blasted them into rubble.
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 4, 2007
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                   
                     the gateway niches had holes for pivots where doors had swung. 
                     two giant stone idols had stood near the fortress in 1838, but fools blasted them into rubble.  a sketch of a head that lay on the road is shown below, with possible writing.  the figure must have stood 18 ft tall.  another early writer said 8 statues were seen in tiwanaku village, and two in la paz.  squier saw the head and bust of a man and woman in front of a church of the village.  several ancient columns were also used in the village. 
                   
                   
                     he considered the temple the oldest structure at tiwanaku. 
                     lake titicaca has 8 principal islands. 
                     squier refers to garcilasso as the most reliable source.
                     barley fails to mature there.  the bitter potato and the quinoa are the staples. 
                     he tells how tschudi acquired some small relics from the ruins, but was surrounded by aymara as he left the ruins, who demanded their return.  squier was watched all day, and his survey marks were removed during the night, with holes dug where stakes had stood.  even the cura was obsessed with tapadas or treasure. 
                     im disappointed with his observations, hoping he would reveal new clues. 
                     titicaca on the bolivian side is a smaller body, shallow for a long ways out, with much covered by a seaweed, which is the primary fodder by the bovine during drought. 
                     the isle of the sun bore the name of titicaca like the lake.  coati is called isle of the moon.  the inca shrines on coati said to be remarkably preserved.  soto has ruins also. 
                     they were greeted as viracocha.
                     building on isle of sun landing was made of blue limestone with clay mortar, and had typical inca niches.  punco means gate. 
                     [btw, from feb 17 until today march 4th chinese celebrate new years, one big party with incredible fireworks continuously.  ] 
                     the gardens and fountain of the incas sounds worth visiting. 
                     the plain of acora on the western shore of titicaca has rude megaliths like brittany. 
                   
                  mike
                   
                   
                • mike white
                  strange megalithic construction at chucuito. [ viracocha means white man, and there were more than one who arrived by sea in different times, and apparently
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 4, 2007
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                     
                        strange megalithic construction at chucuito. 
                        [ viracocha means white man, and there were more than one who arrived by sea in different times, and apparently rose to ruler status.  its possible that these were europeans, but why they would arrive alone is puzzling.  its also strange that this appelation was used since there is much to suggest that inca royalty were also white.  they seem to have been clever and resourceful, but not divine. ]
                       [ the megaliths of acora were more primitive than others in peru.  those at sacsahuaman suggest to me wise giants were the builders.  at a later period smaller megalithic works appear, and these were also well executed, as the size of men reduced.  intelligent giants should be no surprise, they likely having large cranial capacity and long life to accumulate knowledge. ]   
                       puno has silver mines nearby. 
                     
                    mike
                     
                     
                  • mike white
                    [ i wonder if the buildings that were 10 degrees off the cardinal, were also those with pitched gable roofs? i believe that later inca constructions had flat
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 5, 2007
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                       
                         [ i wonder if the buildings that were 10 degrees off the cardinal, were also those with pitched gable roofs?  i believe that later inca constructions had flat roofs, there being so little rain, that it was not a factor.  it may give us an indication that they were older and during a different climate.  machu picchu may be included in the early ones, as those on the islands.  lumber from trees was used in the remote time. ]  
                         squier stood on an ancient wall at the shrine of the moon, which collapsed with his weight, tumbling down and injuring him, and destroying the wall. 
                         he was unable to find anyone who knew where was the temple of the sun on titicaca isle.  he read ramos to determine ruins on the eastern end must be it.  the one he found doesnt seem to fit the grand description given by the chroniclers. 
                         he had a miserable time boating on titicaca, seasick, sudden storms, and becalmed for 5 days, exhausting his stores, in the 14 ft boat. 
                         the lake of umayo has ancient walls on isle, with chulpas nearby.  sillustani has the best chulpas.  cutting hard basalt was no problem, instead of leaving a stone out, they cut the door of the chulpa out of a single stone.  some of the chulpas were unfinished, with ramps still there to show how the stones were raised.  these chulpas sometimes had huge stones 12ft x 6ft x 5ft, cut from a center radius very accurately, with diameter increasing with height.  attributed to the ancient aymara. 
                       
                         much is revealed here, first the similarity between these megalithic circles with those of england, and the likeness of the chulpas to structures in ceylon, all considered portions of lemuria.  second, its clear that these ancient structures were built before the basin was flooded, since its known that titicaca is shrinking in size.  there are likely wonderful ruins below titicaca, its almost certain.    it gives us an idea of how ancient these works are, apparently before the altiplano was submerged in the sea, and later uplifted.  if current geology is believed, we must accord the ruins a greater antiquity. 
                       
                      mike
                       
                       
                    • mike white
                      squier and tschudi had recourse of sometimes using the chulpas for sleeping quarters. [ i must wonder if the lemurians and the atlanteans shared the
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 5, 2007
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                         
                           squier and tschudi had recourse of sometimes using the chulpas for sleeping quarters. 
                           [ i must wonder if the lemurians and the atlanteans shared the dolichocephalic skull shape.  they both were races began in antediluvian times, the former brown, and the latter reported to be red race.  i dont recall that polynesians, melanesians, nor those depicted at angkor wat had the long-headed skull shape, but admit that some olmec figurines show dolichocephalic skull shapes. ] 
                           tschudi reported chulpas north in quichua territory at junin, but they also had dolichocephalic skulls, and may have been aymara moved there by the inca. 
                           [ there are different degrees of dolichocephalic skulls, the aymara might be mildly elongated, whereas the atlantean possibly severe, like akhenaten. ]   
                           [ its possible that inca niches were used to sit mummy ancestors. ] 
                           squier found aymara chulpa and wall ruins to be similar to pelasgian ruins of italy. 
                           travel was easier in inca times than in the 19th c, for the roads, bridges, and tambos were provided in good repair, with food and fodder.  why they dont mine and use their coal is beyond me, for there was no fuel on the puno but sticks sold for their weight in silver. 
                           inca buildings admitted minimum air and light, and one may need to pass thru several rooms to reach outside.  modern puno natives fear night air brings disease. 
                           [yahoo is slow still, i sent msgs a week ago that have not posted yet. ]  
                           the last viracocha assumed the name, not for skin color, but due to a dream warning from a former viracocha incan ancestor.  the former one arrived by sea.  its odd that the last viracocha designed a temple with columns, unique as it were.  the pitched roof and use of timbers hints at an earlier date than legend allows.   humboldt and prescott were not aware of any windows or gables in inca buildings, since machu picchu had not yet been discovered.  author says viracocha means 'froth of the sea'. 
                           he tells tale of a treasure sunk in his majesty frigate hussar at hell's gate. 
                         
                        mike
                         
                          
                      • mike white
                        muyna was the only city he found to be walled. san sebastian was the assigned to the descendants of inca blood. there were no hotels in cuzco then. squier
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 5, 2007
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                           
                             muyna was the only city he found to be walled. 
                             san sebastian was the assigned to the descendants of inca blood. 
                             there were no hotels in cuzco then. 
                           
                              squier draws excellent layouts.  this is the best plan of cuzco ive seen. 
                            
                          mike
                           
                           
                        • mike white
                          paula baker sten is not a member here. i see that her home was listed atlantic mine michigan. a up newspaper might know if she has passed. her work finding
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 7, 2007
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                             
                                paula baker sten is not a member here.  i see that her home was listed atlantic mine michigan.  a up newspaper might know if she has passed.  her work finding a connection of native languages to basque sounds interesting, and promising. 
                               coricancha temple of the sun at cuzco was oriented northeast by southwest, as were many ancient public buildings in the americas of a remote era. 
                               private museums in cuzco had some of the goldern plates that covered the sun temple, 'not thicker than fine note paper'.   the chroniclers reported that the golder nails that held the plates were themselves worth a fortune. 
                               btw, author reports serpents were a royal symbol of the incas inferring the sun, where it seems more likely they were connected to the kundalini force within. 
                               when speaking of gables, squier had indicated humboldt was in error because he had not visited the sierra of peru, yet later he quotes him on the masonry of cuzco.  going to cuzco and failing to see tiwanaku, is like visiting cairo and neglecting giza. 
                               at cuzco, 'there do not remain traces of more than fourteen palaces.'  he uses this to support the shorter king list.  there were other capitols.   
                                he thinks the reports of 200,000 at cuzco was wrong, never over 50,000.  he also considers the moorish additions well-built. 
                               [  it looks like the zigzag walls of sacsahuaman were used to protect the accessible portion of a promonitory, used as a citadel by the pre-incan builders.  one might expect that the builders had works in the valley below where is cuzco.  its possible that the great cyclopean works seen in cuzco were adopted from previous ruins, and the inca only layered his smaller stones atop existing walls, like done at the fortress.   often is seen adobe blocks atop massive stones.   why else would the last viracocha clear a lava bed to build atop massive stone foundations in an area unconnected with his vision, at cacha instead of chita?  a modern engineer could turn out all the men of cuzco, and still be unable to cut, transport 22 miles, and fit such stones.  ] 
                               squier found a subterranean passage, but doubts that it reached to cuzco.  [the cliff face toward cuzco looks much eroded, so was once a larger area contained above. ] 
                               the tired stone of about 1000 tons may have a model plan of the works carved atop it. 
                               moderns have removed the terraces and retaining walls of stone from the cliff face of sacsahuaman, which will lead to its rapid erosion until its all fell down the slope. 
                               squier says much of the stones used are of blue limestone quarried on site. 
                             
                            mike
                             
                              
                          • mike white
                            chingana is the tunnels below sacsahuaman, called a labyrinth. the chairs of the inca would easily fit 25 ft giants. squier s party had stones rolled down upon
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 7, 2007
                            View Source
                            • 0 Attachment
                               
                                 chingana is the tunnels below sacsahuaman, called a labyrinth. 
                                 the chairs of the inca would easily fit 25 ft giants. 
                                 squier's party had stones rolled down upon them when they returned to the coast, thru the defiles they passed.  treasure hunters failed to loot them of supposed tapadas. 
                                 the valley of yucay was the tropical resort of the inca. 
                                 ruins are shown on the map at calca, which must be near machu picchu. 
                                 [ im of the opinion that the term glacier should not be used for the permanent snow-pack on high mountains, unless its in movement.  they move if their residual magnetism is at variance with current location. ]  
                                 invaders coming from the plains of the amazon must pass thru the defile of ollantaytambo. 
                               
                               
                                 this fortress like tiwanaku has cyclopean blocks secured with t clamps of alloy.  as elsewhere, it looks like the masons stopped, and never finished the works.  blocks lay along the inclined plane, one 21.5 ft x 15 ft x  5 ft thick above ground.  slopes are fully terraced for cultivation.  greed cheated science on the content of the alloy.  its certain that the mountains were in place before the fortress was built, but unclear what elevation existed then for the valley.  
                                 this book is fully illustrated with drawings, unfortunate that the photographer died so early.  i spent a few hours using google earth to study peru, many remote signs of constructions, but unable to tell if ancient or modern at the resolution.  several corrals noted at high places for gathering vicuna for shearing remain intact. 
                                 the crude suspension bridges called mimbres still existed by the thousands in peru at squier's visit. 
                                 the natives assumed all foreigners were treasure hunters, or french jewelry peddlers. 
                                
                              mike
                               
                               
                            • mike white
                              Fray Marcos de Niza: In Pursuit of Franciscan Utopia in Americas http://home.tele2.fr/mnallino/Utopia/ the terraces of limatambo are cyclopean and well-fitted.
                              Message 14 of 27 , Mar 7, 2007
                              View Source
                              • 0 Attachment
                                 

                                Fray Marcos de Niza:

                                In Pursuit of Franciscan Utopia in Americas

                                 
                                    the terraces of limatambo are cyclopean and well-fitted. 
                                    town of mollepata had many drunks and thieves. 
                                   bears are sometimes found along the rio de la banca.  la banca has an adobe tambo and grand aquaduct shaded by arches, the hacienda bellavista owner had restored and improved.  many have goitre in this area.  thought to be caused by using snow water, but i think maybe lack of salt with iodine.  nearby was a cliff of various colored salt. 
                                   he found only small sections of inca roads in central and southern peru.  mule paths are marked by cairns of rock piles. 
                                   ' the civilization of the country was far higher before the conquest than now.' 
                                mike
                                 
                                 
                              • mike white
                                the descent to ayacucho was their most miserable day. formerly called guamanga. in 1637 near guinoa, 2 leagues from ayacocha, was found an underground palace
                                Message 15 of 27 , Mar 8, 2007
                                View Source
                                • 0 Attachment
                                   
                                     the descent to ayacucho was their most miserable day.  formerly called guamanga. 
                                     in 1637 near guinoa, 2 leagues from ayacocha, was found an underground palace with statues.  one mounted on horse.  squier never verified this story.  tablet with inscription.  told by senor pinelo.  elevation 14,000-18,000 ft.  im surprisd so high, i had considered a visit there on the ascent to acclimatize.  has a train depot i think.  i wonder if the giant oysters are nearby? 
                                     journey from cuzco to pisco took 30 days. 
                                     garcilaso gives 14 inca emperors, while montesinos records 101.  the former an aymara, the latter a quichua.  could well be the quichua had learning and letters before the aymara.  the quichua might consider inca rule a continuation of the kings of quito, where the inca may have began. 
                                     conclusion chapter ...
                                     [ it seems certain that sacsahuaman was built as a fortress long ago.  since then the river valleys on either side have widened, making it worthless.  the area within the walls must have been larger, but erosion has reduced it significantly.  during inca times it was indefensible to flanking movements, which proves it was not built by the inca, but thousands of years before, if not tens of thousands. 
                                     the other major fortresses were ollantaytambo, began in pre-inca time, and protects from the north and east.  that of pisac defends the inca from the east.  other routes of attack were defended from ridge tops in the passes.  one might expect a fortress to defend the empire from the south and southeast, but it was not mentioned. 
                                     peru should be viewed as several epochs overlaying one another.  their monuments should be viewed separately, as they were in the different eras.  its made difficult by later cultures adopting the ruins of those before, and adding to them. 
                                     if i can tour peru, i will see the inca ruins, but more interesting to me are the monuments that existed before the inca, the megalithic and cyclopean works.  next in importance are the coastal cultures, and ruins uplifted in the western cordilleras, which show evidence of a major climate change since their occupation. 
                                     the ica stones are in a class by themselves for the most archaic antiquity.  there may be many other sites in the atacama that extend back to these remote times, that will remove all doubt as to the distant period when thinking man existed on earth.  note that ica stones were found in tombs of the inca.  ] 
                                   
                                  mike
                                   
                                   
                                • mike white
                                  huanuco de viejo is full of inca ruins. solitary travellers on the puna are often murdered by their indian hosts. some sink in marshes and perish. experience
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Mar 12, 2007
                                  View Source
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                     
                                       huanuco de viejo is full of inca ruins. 
                                       solitary travellers on the puna are often murdered by their indian hosts. 
                                       some sink in marshes and perish. 
                                       experience allows one to shape his course by the flight of birds. 
                                       tschudi had an attack of soroche while alone with a snow storm upon him, and would have perished had the symptoms not passed quickly.  his mind was dulled getting him lost, regaining the trail from bones of mules seen in the snow, then having an attack of surumpe.  he luckily sheltered in a cave, falling asleep, with dawn he was startled to find he was using a corpse for a pillow.  he tried to flee but found his mule died during the night.  he was saved by two shepherds from the folly of travelling alone. 
                                       the level highlands are the puna, while the valleys below them are termed sierra.  the nights in summer are colder than in winter. 
                                        indians prefer blue color.  eggs are used as money.  they love gambling.  when frost takes their crop they eat grass like cattle. 
                                       when first introduced in europe, potatoes and tea were not  liked. 
                                     
                                       lara be sure to see aguacu falls.  higher than niagara at 269 ft.  might get a good deal on a leather coat.  do you speak portuguese? 
                                     
                                     
                                    mike  
                                      
                                      
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.