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ireland

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  • michael
    ireland seen with discerning eyes. much on its ancient stones and lore. im enjoying it so much, that now i want to spend time there.
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
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      ireland seen with discerning eyes. much on its ancient stones and
      lore. im enjoying it so much, that now i want to spend time there.

      http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?fk_files=56156&pageno=1

      mike
    • mike white
      From Fermanagh, where this huge circle is, we gain our best clue to the age of all these monuments, everywhere so much like each other in their massive
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
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        "   From Fermanagh, where this huge circle is, we gain our best clue to the age of all these monuments, everywhere so much like each other in their massive form and dimensions, everywhere so like in their utter mystery.  Round the lakes of Erne there are wide expanses of peat, dug as fuel for centuries, and in many places as much as twelve feet deep, on a bed of clay, the waste of old glaciers. Though formed with incredible slowness, this whole mass of peat has grown since some of the great stone monuments were built; if we can tell the time thus taken for its growth we know at least the nearer limit of the time that divides us from their builders.  "
           [ if the peat resulted from glacier action, and the stones were erected before the peat, are not the monuments before the last ice-age?  how could they survive the grinding? ]
         
        mike
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: michael
        Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2006 2:09 PM
        Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] ireland



        ireland seen with discerning eyes. much on its ancient stones and
        lore. im enjoying it so much, that now i want to spend time there.

        http://www.gutenber g.org/catalog/ world/readfile? fk_files= 56156&pageno= 1

        mike

      • michael
        dating peat and monuments : Like a tree, the peat has its time of growth and its time of rest. Spring covers it with green, winter sees it brown and dead.
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
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          dating peat and monuments :

          " Like a tree, the peat has its time of growth and its time of rest.
          Spring covers it with green, winter sees it brown and dead. Thus thin
          layers are spread over it, a layer for a year, and it steadily gains in
          thickness with the passing of the years. The deeper levels are buried
          and pressed down, slowly growing firm and rigid, but still keeping the
          marks of the layers that make them up. It is like a dry ocean gradually
          submerging the land. Gathering round the great stone circles as they
          stand on the clay, this black sea has risen slowly but surely, till at
          last it has covered them with its dark waves, and they rest in the
          quiet depths, with a green foam of spring freshness far above
          their heads.

          At Killee and Breagho, near Enniskillen, the peat has once more been
          cut away, restoring some of these great stones to the light. If we
          count the layers and measure the thickness of the peat, we can tell
          how many years are represented by its growth. We can, therefore, tell
          that the great stone circle, which the first growth of peat found
          already there, must be at least as old, and may be indefinitely older.
          By careful count it is found that one foot of black peat is made up of
          eight hundred layers; eight hundred summers and eight hundred winters
          went to the building of it. One foot of black peat, therefore, will
          measure the time from before the founding of Rome or the First
          Olympiad to the beginning of our era. Another foot will bring us to
          the crowning of Charlemagne. Yet another, to the death of Shakespeare
          and Cervantes. Since then, only a few inches have been added. Here is
          a chronometer worthy of our great cromlechs and stone circles.

          Some of these, as we saw, rest on the clay, with a sea of peat twelve
          feet deep around and above them. Every foot of the peat stands for
          eight centuries. Since the peat began to form, eight or ten thousand
          years have passed, and when that vast period began, the great
          monuments of stone were already there. How long they had stood in
          their silence before our chronometer began to run we cannot even
          guess. "

          mike


          --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "michael"
          <infoplz@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > ireland seen with discerning eyes. much on its ancient stones
          and
          > lore. im enjoying it so much, that now i want to spend time there.
          >
          > http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?
          fk_files=56156&pageno=1
          >
          > mike
          >
        • michael
          scripts on megaliths? Three cromlechs in the same limestone plain add something to the mystery that overhangs all the rest. The first, at Lennan in Monaghan,
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
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            scripts on megaliths?

            " Three cromlechs in the same limestone plain add something to the
            mystery that overhangs all the rest. The first, at Lennan in
            Monaghan, is marked with a curious cryptic design, suggesting a clue,
            yet yielding none. There is a like script on the cromlech at
            Castlederg in Tyrone, if indeed the markings were ever the record of
            some thought to be remembered, and not mere ornament. The chambered
            cromlech of Lisbellaw in Fermanagh has like markings; they are too
            similar to be quite independent, yet almost too simple to contain a
            recorded thought. "

            mike


            --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "michael"
            <infoplz@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > dating peat and monuments :
            >
            > " Like a tree, the peat has its time of growth and its time of
            rest.
            > Spring covers it with green, winter sees it brown and dead. Thus
            thin
            > layers are spread over it, a layer for a year, and it steadily
            gains in
            > thickness with the passing of the years. The deeper levels are
            buried
            > and pressed down, slowly growing firm and rigid, but still keeping
            the
            > marks of the layers that make them up. It is like a dry ocean
            gradually
            > submerging the land. Gathering round the great stone circles as they
            > stand on the clay, this black sea has risen slowly but surely, till
            at
            > last it has covered them with its dark waves, and they rest in the
            > quiet depths, with a green foam of spring freshness far above
            > their heads.
            >
            > At Killee and Breagho, near Enniskillen, the peat has once more
            been
            > cut away, restoring some of these great stones to the light. If we
            > count the layers and measure the thickness of the peat, we can tell
            > how many years are represented by its growth. We can, therefore,
            tell
            > that the great stone circle, which the first growth of peat found
            > already there, must be at least as old, and may be indefinitely
            older.
            > By careful count it is found that one foot of black peat is made up
            of
            > eight hundred layers; eight hundred summers and eight hundred
            winters
            > went to the building of it. One foot of black peat, therefore, will
            > measure the time from before the founding of Rome or the First
            > Olympiad to the beginning of our era. Another foot will bring us
            to
            > the crowning of Charlemagne. Yet another, to the death of
            Shakespeare
            > and Cervantes. Since then, only a few inches have been added. Here
            is
            > a chronometer worthy of our great cromlechs and stone circles.
            >
            > Some of these, as we saw, rest on the clay, with a sea of peat
            twelve
            > feet deep around and above them. Every foot of the peat stands for
            > eight centuries. Since the peat began to form, eight or ten
            thousand
            > years have passed, and when that vast period began, the great
            > monuments of stone were already there. How long they had stood in
            > their silence before our chronometer began to run we cannot even
            > guess. "
            >
            > mike
            >
            >
            > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "michael"
            > <infoplz@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ireland seen with discerning eyes. much on its ancient stones
            > and
            > > lore. im enjoying it so much, that now i want to spend time
            there.
            > >
            > > http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?
            > fk_files=56156&pageno=1
            > >
            > > mike
            > >
            >
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