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Lost Cities of the Amazon

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  • jdaintira@aol.com
    I finally watched my tape of this on Saturday (episode of Digging for the Truth), and it was quite wonderful. They are rerunning blocks of the recent shows,
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1 12:01 AM
      I finally watched my tape of this on Saturday (episode of Digging for the Truth), and it was quite wonderful.
       
      They are rerunning blocks of the recent shows, and so it should be on again soon.
       
      The original Monday showings are 9 pm my time (Pacific) and again at 1 am.
       
      On Saturday I also caught the show re the Queen of Sheba which I had missed when it was first on as part of a four hour block, and it was fascinating, especially the ruins of an ancient dam in Yeman and a strange scrip  found in both Yeman and Ethiopia  that seems hauntingly familiar, perhaps from the Amazon. 
       
      For some reason the sophisticated construction of the Yeman dam also reminded me of an ancient ruined dam on Sri Lanka.
       
      Lost Cities of the Amazon had no massive stone cities discovered but many intriguing hints.
       
      The jungle takes over so rapidly in this climate that the structures can be lost in a very short period of time.
       
      Some of the aerial work was especially intriguing, showing the huge circular central plaza of an abandoned city as well as the long straight roads leading from it in many directions.
       
      The circle with  radiating arms also had a Sun Dial effect.
       
      These roads reminded me a lot of the sac' be's among the Maya.
       
      Hearing of the first Spanish explorers claiming large cities lining the banks of the river, and then nothing a short time later.
       
      It is so clear that disease, especially small pox, decimated the native populations, and that the survivors moved out of their larger cities much as the Maya had done.
       
      These European diseases managed to move through the New World much faster and often many years before the "white men" showed up in person.
       
      There was also a sophisticated agriculture that had created a special planting soil which allowed them to sustain huge populations, and now  no one can now figure out how to duplicate it.
       
      I especially enjoyed the few shots of the city of Manaus, Brazil, headquarters of the Central Amazon basin.
       
      I have not made it to Manaus yet, but it has been near the top of my wish list since reading Black Orchid over 30 years ago. 
       
      For anyone who missed it, this is the ultimate adventure novel, by Nicholas Meyer and Barry J. Kaplan.  Amazon.com has someone offering a copy for one penny plus shipping.
       
      A mad chase down the Amazon with piranhas and flash eating army ants.  Of course it made me  want to go.
       
      ~ Judith Marie
    • jdaintira@aol.com
      For those who missed this episode of Digging for the Truth, it is scheduled to be repeated twice Monday night on the History channel. ~ JM
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 5, 2006
        For those who missed this episode of Digging for the Truth, it is scheduled to be repeated twice Monday night on the History channel.
         
        ~ JM
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