Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: book review : brine's "ancient earthworks and temples ..." [my musings]

Expand Messages
  • mike white
    yucatan : his account of the custom of divining through the medium of a crystal . the most frequent divination is by means of a piece of crystal which they
    Message 1 of 40 , Sep 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
       
         yucatan : 'his account of the custom of divining through the medium of a crystal'. 
         'the most frequent divination is by means of a piece of crystal which they call zaztun.'  'a clear and transparent stone, by which they say that occult things are seen and the causes of sickness.'   
         brine kept calling the cenotes natural formations, even though they were 100 ft down to the water, with stairs cut into the stone. 
         'his men, speaking basque, were able to make themselves understood by the indians living on these coasts, especially in the regions around tabasco beyond carmen and the bay of terminos.' 
         an antiquary named clarke lived on cedar key, and had collected much, including tales of pirates and treasures. 
         enormous shell middens indicate a dense population in florida before the conquest, they came in season. 
         brine quotes the smithsonian cyrus thomas making a case that natives built the mounds.   cherokees indicated
         lucien carr of the peabody museum wrote the mounds were the 'work of the red indians of historic times, or of their immediate ancestors.' 
         'the majority of the modern american archaeologists consider that the aboriginal inhabitants were never in a higher state of civilization than they were when they first became known to europeans.' 
         brine conjectured : 'the tallegwi were the same race who were afterwards known as toltecs.'   he interpreted giant as 'great'. 
         'an extraordinarily rigid line of caste was maintained amongst the quiches.' 
         brine has the quiche migrating south from ohio. 
         brine seems correct when he notes the similarity in the dress of the caciques of the quiche at the time of the conquest, to those depicted on the altars and tablets of palenque.  like the nobility and ruling class had descended intact from the construction of the great mayan complexes.  [could the quiche have been conquerors, and a different people from the masses, as the inca were?  ive not read that the quiche were anything but of the same red race as the commoners.  the murals depict red race with dolichocephalic skulls.  i noted some tribes or districts were of brown-raced people in our southwest, up near taos.] 
         [we probably shouldnt even use 'maya' to name this people, since the name means people, and the tribe wasnt called that, it a propagaded error from first contact.  quiche may be the correct name.] 
         'in a manuscript left in a franciscan convent by one of the descendants of the quiches, an account was given of the migrations of that tribe before they settled near utatlan.'   'after a long journey from mexico, and adopted the name of quiche in memory of one of their leaders; but before that time the people were called toltecs.'  [this seems to respond to my question.] 
         tihoo became merida.  had buildings of the puuic style like uxmal, but long abandoned.   tihoo was connected by paved road with izamal. 
         native legends reported a big invasion 'about two hundred years' before the conquest.  implying the aztec arrival then.  most of the yucatan was dominated by the aztec afterwards. 
         'the historians who have investigated those traditions concur in considering that the arrival of the toltecs within mexican territory happened in the seventh century.' 
         'it follows that all the stone edifices in these regions must have been erected later than that date.'
         'the aztecs arrived at the close of the twelfth century.' 
         'according to humboldt, the toltecs arrived in anahuac [mexico] a.d. 648, and reached tula in 670.'  having that they afterwards raised teotihuacan and cholula. 
        
       
      Kind regards,
      Mike White
      http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
       
       
    • mike white
      [the legend of spanish bishops sailing west after the fall of spain to the moors in the 8th c, may be supported by the chronicle of akakor. this book tells of
      Message 40 of 40 , Sep 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
         
           [the legend of spanish bishops sailing west after the fall of spain to the moors in the 8th c, may be supported by the chronicle of akakor.  this book tells of goths arriving in northern south america, and becoming part of the tribes who lived inland along the orinoco.  these voyagers may not have called themselves spaniards, but may have clung to their gothic origins.  it stretches and gropes exceedingly, to assume they were the 20 white strangers who brought religion and wisdom to mexico, and directed that pyramids and temples be erected.  however, this would explain the brass crosses over graves in early yucatan.] 
           'in 1833 a junk was wrecked near vancouver island.'  the year before a japanese fishing vessel reached hawaii. 
         
        finis ...
         
        Kind regards,
        Mike White
        http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm

         
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.